Aug 21

Is There Connection Between Elbow And Shoulder For Matz?

In ascertaining Steven Matz’s shoulder issue, perhaps the Mets should revisit their earlier proclamation the left-hander’s bone spur injury was simply a matter of pain tolerance, as suggested by both GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins.

On June 28 – nearly two months ago – I wrote that was nonsense. Everybody knows, and I should lump Alderson into that group, any injury with a pitcher should be considered more serious than it is and, injuries/hurts leads to overcompensation with another part of the body.

MATZ: Is there connection between elbow and shoulder? (AP)

MATZ: Is there connection between elbow and shoulder? (AP)

I undoubtedly admire Matz’s warrior spirit, but let’s face it, this is his first full season in the major leagues and he doesn’t have the resume to call his own shots. He wants to pitch, I get that, but like most young players he doesn’t have the smarts or backbone to tell his real feelings to Collins or management.

As baseball lifers, both Collins and Alderson should realize what was going on with Matz and protect him.

This is what Alderson said in late June: “At this point, it’s a function of whether he can tolerate the discomfort while continuing to pitch. What we will do is monitor that level of discomfort.”

I take two things from that statement. The first is, and I said it at the time, Alderson’s comment was garbage, that pain tolerance is simply a misguided assumption. You can’t assume anything with an injury. Can’t be done.

The second is if Matz’s shoulder is now an issue their level of monitoring leaves a lot to be desired.

Look, I can’t say with 100 percent certainty there is a connection between the elbow and the shoulder, but the flip side Alderson can’t say with 100 percent absoluteness it isn’t.

I believe, and this comes from years of following the Mets, they too frequently play fast and loose with injuries.

The Mets’ first course of action with injuries should always be caution. They weren’t with Matz and the same it appears is happening with Noah Syndergaard. They weren’t with Matt Harvey.

Matz will travel to New York Monday to be examined by team doctors, something that should have been done as soon as he was scratched from his last start.

Nobody knows what the doctors will find with Matz, but the Mets’ appropriate response should be getting him better and stronger, not seeing if he can throw five innings next weekend against the Phillies.

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Aug 13

Mets Need DeGrom To Pitch Like An Ace Tonight

The word “ace” has been thrown around a lot lately regarding the Mets’ young rotation. The label was applied – erroneously, perhaps to Matt Harvey – and Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz have come up short.

DE GROM: Mets need him tonight. (AP)

DE GROM: Mets need him tonight. (AP)

That leaves us with Jacob deGrom (7-5, 2.35 ERA), who after a stretch of 10 winless starts from May through June, has pitched well winning four of five decisions.

Of all those young arms, I was always highest on deGrom, and he’s pitched like an ace. It’s not a reach to say he’s kept the Mets afloat.

During those two bad months, his command was off and velocity down. He looked tired and drained physically with his pitch-count was too high compared to the number of innings pitched.

However, he’s turned things around and in his last eight starts has a near two mph., bump in his velocity. While the movement on his fastball is better, so is the command of his secondary pitches. During that span he has a 1.52 ERA and threw a one-hit shutout over the Phillies, July 17.

DeGrom is pitching to the level the Mets always hoped he’d reach, but more importantly to the level they must get from him.

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Aug 03

Pet Peeve: Out Of Control Umpires

NOTE:  I’d like to introduce something new – Pet Peeve – where I respond to something in baseball, not necessarily pertaining to the Mets.

An umpire’s position merits respect much like a cop on the beat, but at the same time, shouldn’t they have to earn it?

They earn it by being consistent. By being fair. By keeping their emotions in check. By having patience. By not losing control.

The episode the other night in Philadelphia with plate umpire Bob Davidson is the perfect example of what the players complain about, and that is being a bully. Upset over a fan reportedly yelling at him – over and over –  “you suck,” Davidson walked over the stands next to the dugout and had the fan ejected from the stadium.

It wasn’t the first time he had a fan tossed. He did it several years ago at a Cardinals-Brewers game in Milwaukee. He had a field day that afternoon, bouncing players, managers and a fan.

What happened In Philly was arrogance to the highest degree. Not only did he act outside his jurisdiction, but what he did underscored one of the things players hate about umpires: That they have rabbit ears.

Heckling is part of the game, and if Davidson is that sensitive to where he can’t take it he should retire.

Were the fans sitting next to this guy angry enough to where they called security? Not to anything I’ve read. Davidson said the Philadelphia fans cheered him, but that’s hard to believe.

It is up to the Phillies to maintain their crowds. They should monitor the crowd to ensure things are under control; nobody is threatened or uncomfortable; and that everybody is having a good time.

Apparently, Davidson wasn’t, and that’s just too bad.

Davidson’s actions could have provoked something ugly. What if this guy broke free as he was being escorted and charged the field? What if he was part of a group?

What if? What if?

What Davidson should have done if he was so concerned about the women who might be offended – that was his claim – was to have security tell the guy to tone it down. Davidson didn’t do this. Nor did he tell the fan himself to shut up.

Davidson exceeded his authority and should be reprimanded. I don’t care how. Fine him. Suspend him. Do both.

It’s bad enough many of these umpires fly solo and insist on their own strike zones, but to police the crowd, to be cop, judge and jury goes over the line.

Get Davidson out of here.

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Jul 16

Three Mets’ Storylines: Fundamentals Lacking

It was the same old story for the Mets Saturday night in Philadelphia: No Fundies, no fun.

Although the Mets hit two sacrifice flies, their continued inability to hit with runners in scoring position – their primary first-half flaw – re-surfaced again in a 4-2 loss to the Phillies that dropped them seven games behind Washington.

VERRETT: Bright spot. (Getty)

VERRETT: Bright spot. (Getty)

After Juan Lagares’ sacrifice put runners on second and third with one out in the seventh, they came up empty. Then in the bottom of the inning, Asdrubal Cabrera’s throwing error on seemingly a routine play put on what turned out to be the winning run on base.

The seventh-inning breakdowns continued to underscore what has been a theme this season in that when the Mets don’t hit a homer then won’t win.

“We’re not driving in runs when we need to,” manager Terry Collins told reporters. “We’re not taking care of those opportunities when we get them.”

We can debate from now until the trade deadline what the Mets need more: another bat; a starter; or a reliever. But none of that matters if they don’t execute the fundamentals, and tonight that was the key storyline.

The others:

VERRETT GAVE THEM A CHANCE: Logan Verrett took the ball with the very real possibility he was pitching to stay in the rotation as Matt Harvey’s replacement.

Verrett gave up a homer to Ryan Howard, but few Mets’ pitchers haven’t. Verrett gave up two runs in six innings, which is the definition of a quality start.

Verrett walked only one and struck out four and for the second straight start threw over 100 pitches. If there was a negative, it was getting ahead of hitters but not putting them away.

Even so, he should stay in the rotation.

“At this moment we don’t have a lot of options,” Collins said. “But he’s got to give us good innings. That’s the job of any pitcher. … We’re just hoping that now, with it being a little bit more of a consistent role, he starts to find that command that makes him so effective.’’

CESPEDES STATUS UNCERTAIN: Collins said Yoenis Cespedes could have pinch-hit in the ninth if the Mets put a tying run on base.

However, Collins also said he doesn’t know what would have happened had Cespedes got on base or his availability Sunday. As of now, Cespedes hasn’t played since July 8. The Mets gambled he would heal during the All-Star break, but that hasn’t happened.

It might be time to DL him and bring up Michael Conforto.

 

Jun 10

Mets Should Consider Rollins

It is a no-brainer in the sense the Mets have nothing to lose if they rolled the dice on former nemesis Jimmy Rollins, who was designated for assignment Friday by the Chicago White Sox.

If it didn’t work out, the Mets could always release him, so why not take a chance? What would it hurt? Some team will make a run at Rollins. Why not the Mets? And, he won’t cost much.

ROLLINS: Why not? (Getty)

ROLLINS: Why not? (Getty)

Of course, Rollins isn’t the same player who once tormented the Mets – along with his double-play partner Chase Utley – but has a winning mentality and could bring something to the table down the stretch.

This season, Rollins, 37, was hitting .221 with two home runs and eight RBI in 41 games with the White Sox. But, he was signed as a role player, evidenced by his $2 million contract.

Once sizzling at 13 games over .500, the White Sox have lost 12 of their last 15 games and entered Friday’s play at 30-30. The Mets aren’t hot either, but they are still very much a playoff contender.

The Mets have a runner on third with one out late in the game. Who would you rather have at the plate, Rollins or Eric Campbell? Or Ty Kelly?

Rollins is better than anybody the Mets have to spell Asdrubal Cabrera at shortstop. Although no longer a blazer, he does bring an element of speed, something the Mets lack. Two years ago – his last with the Phillies – he stole 28 bases.

A line drive hitter, he has been a doubles and triples machine during his career. Of course, he’s not in his prime. It would be ridiculous to think he is. However, it isn’t a stretch to think there could be a flashback moment this summer when he could help the Mets steal a game.

And, isn’t that the point of mid-season additions?