Nov 01

Back in the saddle; Mets aren’t.

Greetings folks.

I just got my power back this morning, but don’t have heat. Some kind of surge during the outage blew out the furnace and they aren’t coming until tomorrow. Shivering here, and not getting any warmer learning about the Mets’ offseason plans.

The difference between the Yankees and Mets surfaced again yesterday with the news the Yankees re-signed GM Brian Cashman and reached an agreement on an extension with pitcher C.C. Sabathia. That’s the agressive, proactive approach.

Meanwhile, Mets’ GM Sandy Alderson announced the fences would be moved in, but their exclusive negotiating rights with Jose Reyes would pass without the franchise making an offer. Alderson said this would be a “slow process.”

As I recently suggested, the Mets will let others define the market for Reyes with the hope the shortstop will find the options limited and he’ll opt to stay home. Cherry picking, they call it, and it worked in the trade for Johan Santana.

With big spenders in the Yankees and Red Sox seemingly out, the Cubs not needing a shortstop and their aim on Albert Pujols or Prince Fielder, and the Dodgers being a mess, the market is thinner than Reyes’ agent, Peter Greenberg, would like.

The Phillies – if they don’t re-sign Jimmy Rollins – San Francisco, the Angels and Washington are also reported as teams that might have an interest in Reyes. That’s a decidedly reactive approach, and further defines the comparison to the Yankees.

The likelihood of the Mets re-signing Reyes seems remote, so this might be their best chance to keep him because they won’t be the highest bidder.

The decision to move in the fences will probably cut down on the triples and increase home runs, and some will read this as an admission, or concession, they will lose their All-Star shortstop.

The decision has more to do with salvaging the contract of Jason Bay and reviving  David Wright’s career, which has shown a significant power decline the past three seasons.

Citi Field was designed for a team built on pitching, defense and speed, but the Mets have not added those kinds of players. At least, not enough of them.

I still believe that’s the most fundamental way to construct a team, but the Mets are a team in financial distress and are hoping an increase in home runs will make the cash registers ring.

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 11

March 11.10: Reyes out 2 to 8 weeks.

The injury news keeps on coming for the Mets. And, it isn’t good. But, it sounds familiar.

Jose Reyes’ overative thyroid has gone from he’ll be fine to being out two to eight weeks. Where have we heard that before? And, with Reyes, too.

The test results are in and GM Omar Minaya said: `“It doesn’t look good right now. We will have to prepare for that.”

Reyes will shut it down completely and remain at home. He’ll join Carlos Beltran on the disabled list at the start of the season.

Reyes’ agent , Peter Greenberg, said:  “Jose is obviously a little bit disappointed that it’s going to be a matter of weeks as opposed to days, but it’s a completely, treatable, curable situation. I think we all view it as good news.”

Minaya said there was no medication for this and he will be treated with diet and exercise. That seems odd, isn’t there a medication for everything? And, another thing I don’t understand, if rest and diet reduce his numbers to normal levels then what happens when he gets his heart rate up again.

I’m amazed there is no treatment. That’s not what I read.

Mar 10

March 10.10: Reyes update/line-ups.

Jose Reyes has a case of hyperthyroidism, said his agent, Peter Greenberg said. “We’re waiting for the final results tomorrow,’’ Greenberg told the Times. “But, all indications are that it’s the most minimal case of hyperthyroidism possible. The doctor is very pleased and so is Jose.’’

Reyes later told reporters that his thyroid is fine. I don’t believe this is two different stories as much as it is Reyes getting positive news and downplaying things.

Reyes could resume working out in a few days.

For the all the criticism the Mets have received about injuries, they did well here. Reyes was pulled immediately at the suspicion of something wrong and were forthright in giving information.

Positive news on Francisco Rodriguez. Threw in the bullpen this morning and will throw BP Friday. If all goes well look for him Monday.

Jon Niese, who has the leg up on the fifth starter position, starts today against the Braves in Orlando.

Here’s the line-up:

Jason Pridie, CF

Ruben Tejada, 2B

Daniel Murphy, 1B

Mike Hessman, 3B

Chris Carter, DH

Omir Santos, C

Kirk Nieuwenhuis, RF

Jolbert Cabrera, LF

Russ Adams, SS

Working out of the pen will be Fernando Nieve, Nelson Figueroa, Bobby Parnell, Eddie Kunz and Eric Niesen.

Oct 02

Enough of the guessing …. you really don’t know.

It is agent Peter Greenberg’s job to protect his client, to put the best spin possible, but in this case he really doesn’t know. Greenberg is only guessing when he says, “He is going to be good for next year. I don’t think that is a question.”

Of course, it is a question. It’s one nobody really knows.

REYES: Nobody can say when he'll be ready.

REYES: Nobody can say when he'll be ready.


Greenberg told Jeff Wilpon that Jose Reyes, who has a torn hamstring, should be working out in either December or January. But, is that with or without surgery? Nobody is saying.

If Reyes’ injury is a new one sustained when he tried running this week, it’s more bad luck. Or is it? Had the Mets been proactive in their treatment, then this is more than bad luck. Perhaps, the weakened condition of Reyes’ tendon problem made the tear possible. One must consider all the possibilities.

If, what happened was the worsening of the original condition, then this was poorly played.

Come to think of it, it was poorly played all along. The perception was Reyes was dictating all the shots, and when does a patient do that? Yet, another Mets’ injury spins out of control.

If the hamstring hasn’t healed by now, it won’t without surgery. And, once you go under the knife, everybody’s recovery time is different. So, Greenberg can’t say December. What if it is January of February? If that’s the case, there’s no way Reyes will be ready for spring training.

And, what if Reyes injured himself to such a degree that the surgery doesn’t work? Or the surgery is more extensive than what is anticipated?

All season there have been projections of Reyes’ return and none of them have been correct. Why should this time be any different?

Nobody really knows. What we do know, is that this has been a mess.