Jul 24

Young Can’t Stop Mets Freefall

Chris Young did his job. Two runs we’ll take. And, it happened early. Then the Mets became amazing again, and not in a good way.

A team rallies to tie the game late, then gets blown away in extra innings. How often does that happen? Maybe once every few seasons? But, in back-to-back games? I wish I were joking, but nope. It happened Sunday and Monday. The Mets have now lost five straight, again, and ten of 11.

Yup, that’s the definition of freefall.

Ruben Tejada committed a costly error last night, but it is hard to get on him because he’s been so good this season. Pedro Beato couldn’t overcome adversity, which is his job. He’s gone.

It looks as if Lucas Duda might be optioned to make room for Matt Harvey, but does it matter anymore?

Jul 17

Only The Mets

Yes, only the Mets could lose one like this. Reminiscent of the balk game in Atlanta. Of course, you remember?

HARPER: Bryce Harper barreling into David Wright on game-tying triple. (AP)

After a dramatic ninth-inning comeback – wouldn’t it be great if Jordany Valdespin could pinch-hit three times a game? – the Mets blew leads in the ninth and tenth innings in losing 5-4 in ten innings to the Nationals tonight.

Resiliency has been the Mets’ signature all year. So too, the Nationals, which is why they are in first place.

The Mets left runners on base. David Wright on third with no outs in the seventh and they couldn’t get him home. A bad call likely cost the Mets a run in the eighth. Andres Torres was clearly safe at first, and assuming the events would follow as they did, would have scored on Daniel Murphy’s double.

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Jun 29

Bullpen Market Thin For Mets

The Mets have several needs that should be addressed by the trade deadline, but only one THAT MUST be if this team is to continue its development and possibly contend this season.

The inside options aren’t many – or overwhelming – and rushing starter prospects Zach Wheeler and Matt Harvey would be a horrendous idea. And, it looks as if Jenrry Mejia’s return the Mets via the bullpen won’t happen. There will be some promotions, such as Pedro Beato, maybe there will be a lightning bolt of some kind and nobody we’d expect could be thrust into the bullpen.

STREET: Would fill huge void.

Trading doesn’t figure to heat up until the last few days as there’s really no reason why a team would deal now without fully testing the entire market. Conversely, if a team is in dire need it might be forced to overpay. The Mets have overpaid in terms of salary, but they don’t have a multitude of chips available to make a big deal. It would have to be a perfect fit.

The most often mentioned names are Oakland’s Grant Balfour, San Diego’s Huston Street and Houston’s Brett Myers. Myers, Street and Balfour – in that order – will be the priciest.

Street has twice saved at least 35 games, and last year had 29.

Balfour is in the second season of a two-year $8.1 million contract and the club holds a $4.5 million option for 2013.

Street is in the final season of a three-year, $22.5 million pact with a $9 million option for 2013 or $500,000 buyout.

Myers, who has been linked to the Mets before, is in the final season of a two-year, $23-million contract, plus a $10 million club option for 2013 or a $3 million buyout.

 

Sep 07

Collins waffling on Parnell?

One of the many things about Jerry Manuel that drove me crazy was his inability to make, and stick, with a decision. For the most part Terry Collins has been the opposite, but there are waffling signs with him on Bobby Parnell.

PARNELL: Is Collins waffling on him as closer?

After Parnell’s blown save against the Nationals, Collins said Parnell would stay in the closer role because he wanted to display faith and avoid a kneejerk decision.

Collins wasn’t so supportive after last night, and suggested Parnell might need some non-save opportunities to bolster his confidence.

There’s no question about Parnell’s stuff, but his command is what has gotten him in trouble. Wildness isn’t just walking batters, but falling behind in the count and having to come in with the fastball.

Of course, that’s consistent with every pitcher.

As Parnell needs to develop confidence in his secondary pitches, he also has to get some from his manager. Collins said he’d get a chance to win the closer role, and that means overcoming rough stretches. That’s hard to do when it’s not the ninth inning, because part of becoming a closer is coming to grips with it being the final inning.

This is a prime learning opportunity with games that have meaning, definitely more of a test than during spring training.

No, I can’t say Parnell will ever become a quality major league closer. I can’t say he won’t, either. But, we’ll never know unless Collins sticks with him for the remaining three weeks. Manuel sabotaged Parnell as a starter several years ago. Here’s hoping Collins doesn’t do the same as a closer.

That’s in the best interest of Parnell and the Mets, because if you look at the other options – Manny Acosta, Pedro Beato or Jason Isringhausen – you realize Parnell has the highest ceiling for 2012.

 

May 01

Mets performed as expected in April.

Where did that winning streak go? It was here a moment ago. Instead, it has morphed into a three-game losing skid, which could reach four tonight against Cliff Lee, and keep going when the San Francisco Giants come to town this week.

The Mets closed April at 11-16 and in last place in the NL East, about what most people expected from them. But what most counted on was win two, lose three. Nobody expected the Mets to be as streaky to the extreme as they have been. Losing this way is more frustrating because it preys on your frustrations and fears.

The pitching is going to dictate the Mets’ success this year, and that didn’t disappoint in April, where it was poor for most of the month save a week stretch in which it transformed the Mets into a representative baseball team. The key was Mike Pelfrey, who regressed from last summer. There were occasional bright starts, but for the most part the rotation remains a source of concern, as does the bullpen, which has proven to be highly combustible when overworked.

There’s nobody in the rotation that you feel confident will take you to the seventh. Jon Niese was solid yesterday against Roy Halladay, but who can’t see him bailing after four in his next start.

Pedro Beato and Jason Isringhausen have been dependable. Francisco Rodriguez is still a tight rope act. Bobby Parnell was supposed to be the eighth inning answer, but we don’t know much of his failures are talent or injury related. The remainder of the pen is a hold-your-breath propostion.

Offensively, Daniel Murphy has been solid and Carlos Beltran has performed more, and probably better than expected. Ike Davis has taken a positive step and Jason Bay has played well since coming off the disabled list.

David Wright still strikes out too much for me and is not dependable in the clutch. I still want Jose Reyes to strike out less and walk more.

There are days when the offense can be daunting, yet others when it is puzzling. That pretty much describes the Mets as a whole, which hasn’t been a surprise.