Mar 23

March 23.10: Wrapping up the Day.

Oliver Perez made his fourth start of the spring this afternoon against Atlanta. As usual, he’s run hot and cold. Today he was freezing, turning in his worst outing of the spring, giving up three runs on five hits and four walks in 4 1/3 innings.

Perez figures to get two more starts and for his own peace and confidence he needs to make them good. Of course, that sentiment denotes pressure, which isn’t always a good thing for Perez.

In another pitching development, the Mets continue to push the envelope with Jenrry Mejia, working him for the second straight game. Mejia didn’t allow a run in 1 1/3 innings yesterday, and today he retired the side in order in the sixth.

Said Jerry Manuel: “I want to get as much of a feel as possible for him in that particular role.”

Also today:

* Ike Davis was optioned out and there was immediate talk it was done to alleviate pressure on Daniel Murphy, who has had a miserable spring. If Murphy needs something like that to help his confidence then he’s in trouble. In 25 at-bats, Davis is hitting .480 with three homers and 10 RBI. Conversely, Murphy is batting .133 with one extra-base hit over 30 at-bats.

* Jose Reyes was cleared to play and will be in camp tomorrow.

Dec 21

Dec. 21.09: Should Mets dip into Torreabla waters again?

TORREALBA: Is peace possible?

TORREALBA: Is peace possible?

The last time the Mets looked at Yorvit Torrealba, they backed out of a three-year, $14.4-million deal following a physical a couple of years ago. The Mets had health concerns and pulled out of the signing. When the Mets played the Rockies the following year, Torrealba had no arm strength.

Torrealba, who has since filed a grievance against the Mets, is on the market again. Both sides say they are open to the other.

Bengie Molina, however, is their first choice, but he’s seeking three years.

Torrealba, 31, hit .291 with two homers and 31 RBI in 64 games for the Rockies last season.

If Torrealba’s arm is sound, and the parties can let by-gones be by-gones, it is something to dip into again. Especially since his age is more appealing than Molina’s.

Nov 27

Happy Thanksgiving ….

The Rolling Stones once sang, “we all need somebody we can lean on.”

It’s been a rough year for a lot of people. For me, it was losing my job, but what’s helping me get through this period has been the blog.

It has become a joy and a passion for me to talk with you all. On this day, I am especially grateful to you for your support in getting me through what has been a difficult period. I have leaned on you more than you’ll ever realize.

I wish you nothing but the best for you and your families. Peace.-JD

Sep 08

Wagner done for year, maybe for career?

When Billy Wagner was healthy and popping off on a regular basis, he often joked about retirement. He liked the idea of going out on his terms.

That’s gone now.

Wagner will have surgery to repair a torn MCL in his left elbow, and with recovery time of one year, we’re talking 2010. Wagner has his money, but what remains to be seen is whether he’ll have peace of mine and be willing to leave like this. No athlete wants to leave the game injured.

“That was a scenario that I was not expecting,” general manager Omar Minaya said today.

Wagner walked off the mound during a bullpen session Sunday afternoon. At 37, he has one year and $10.5 million left on the contract signed before the 2006 season.

The Mets hold an $8 million option for 2010, which they likely would not pick up without having seen him pitch next year.

Wagner saved 101 of his 385 career games with the Mets and was a two-time all-star. He lived up to his end of the bargain. Yes, he had blown saves, but nobody quite blew a save like Wagner.

Wagner went on the DL with a strained left forearm, Aug. 5, and the team has gone to a closer-by-committee role. Things were spotty at first, but Luis Ayala settled into the role by converting five of six save opportunities.

“Surgery was always a possibility if things did not get better,” Minaya said. “And we’re at the point right now where things did not get better. … In a lot of ways, you almost got the feeling that we were going to have to do this without Billy. Baseball is not about one guy. It’s about a team, and the concept of togetherness.”