Aug 16

Mets Better Served With Lagares In Center

As much as I enjoy watching Michael Conforto, and have no doubt about his ability to play center field, the Mets would be better served – assuming they don’t shock everybody and bring back Jay Bruce – if Juan Lagares plays center field.

LAGARES: Gold Glover. (AP)

LAGARES: Gold Glover. (AP)

After all, Lagares won a Gold Glove in center and is blessed with outstanding speed, and if GM Sandy Alderson expects to build the 2018 Mets with pitching, defense should be at a premium.

Lagares has flashed his defensive brilliance in this series, and had two hits in tonight’s 5-3 loss to the Yankees. He doubled leading off the game, and what I loved to see, beat out a bunt leading off the eighth.

JUDGE GOES DEEP: Seriously, he went deep for the second time against the Mets, this time driving a Robert Gsellman pitch into the third deck – in left center.

Judge’s 37th homer was measured at 457 feet.

NEW FACE AT THIRD: Both Jose Reyes and Wilmer Flores were scratched from the starting lineup, each with sore rib cage muscles. Travis d’Arnaud started his first professional game at third base.

Rib cage injuries can take a long time to heal so don’t be surprised if one, or both, end up on the disabled list.

The Yankees eschewed a chance to test d’Arnaud in the first inning when they had a runner on third, but Didi Gregorius elected not to lay down a suicide squeeze bunt.

Depending on the situation, d’Arnaud rotated between third and second, but amazingly the ball didn’t find him until Aaron Hicks popped out in the ninth.

WRIGHT UPDATE: David Wright, on the 60-day disabled list with a shoulder impingement and spinal stenosis, thinks it is possible he could play this season, but GM Sandy Alderson doesn’t think he’ll have enough time.

“I don’t know how many answers he will have, or we will have through the end of this season,’’ Alderson said, adding the Mets could attempt to add a third baseman in the offseason.

EXTRA INNINGS: Matt Harvey threw three scoreless innings in his second rehab assignment for Class-A Brooklyn. Harvey struck out the side on ten pitches in the third inning. … Rene Rivera homered, the Mets’ 179th of the season. … Mets’ hitters struck out eight times. … Gsellman, who started for Seth Lugo, gave up three runs on four hits in 5.1 innings. … Paul Sewald gave up a two-run double to Gregorius in the seventh to take the loss.

 

May 17

Alderson Must Take Responsibility Of Mets’ Pitching Collapse

Going against Zack Greinke, it was expected the Mets’ losing streak would reach six, and this morning the fingers would start being pointed.

ALDERSON: Faces a lot of questions. (AP)

ALDERSON: Faces a lot of questions. (AP)

What didn’t happen in the Mets’ 5-4 loss to Arizona was another bullpen meltdown. If you want to call it a moral victory, go for it. I looked for moral victories in the standings and the only thing I could were the regular ones, which have them six games under .500 and nine games behind Washington.

But, wasn’t this team supposed to be a World Series contender if not win the whole thing? They sure were, because many; including GM Sandy Alderson said the Mets possessed the game’s best pitching.

I never bought into that because it simply wasn’t true. How could it be if the vaunted five of Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler had never started a complete cycle in the rotation?

How could it be if there isn’t a 20-game winner among the group?

How could it be if they only have two with at least 30 victories (deGrom 32-23) and Harvey (31-31), with Syndergaard (24-18), Wheeler (20-18) and Matz (13-8) to follow? That’s not greatness, that’s potential.

How could it be, if four entered the season coming off significant surgery, and a fifth – Syndergaard – currently on the 60-day DL?

Wishful thinking is nice to have, but building on it is like a house of cards, capable of collapsing at the slightest nudge or breeze.

The Mets tried to build a group of back-ups, but Seth Lugo is on the DL, Robert Gsellman needs be optioned or sent to the bullpen to work on his mechanic, and Rafael Montero can’t find the plate.

New acquisition Tommy Milone was passable tonight, but you don’t win on passable. The best thing Milone did was work into the sixth, which was followed by Paul Sewald (1.1 innings), Fernando Salas (0.2 innings) and Jerry Blevins (0.1) not allowing a run.

The pen worked just 2.1 innings, but most nights it goes three or four, if not longer.

When fingers are pointed, they are initially directed at manager Terry Collins, but that’s too easy. It’s also too easy to blame pitching coach Dan Warthen. In finding out who is responsible for the Mets’ pitching problems, we must look at the nature of the injuries, and who acquiesced in the handling of Harvey and Syndergaard.

That would be general manager Sandy Alderson.

 

May 06

Mets Wrap: Offense Keeps Rolling

The count is up to nine straight games in which the Mets scored at least five runs. The Mets batted around to score five runs in the first inning, then added on all night to complete an 11-3 victory over the Marlins.

GSELLMAN: Gets win. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Gets win. (AP)

The Mets moved within one game of .500, and go for the sweep with Matt Harvey starting Sunday.

And, once again, the Mets won big without the benefit of the home run, which has been their offensive identity. Tonight they got two bases-loaded walks from Michael Conforto; Asdrubal Cabrera’s RBI double; three RBI by Jay Bruce on two doubles; one RBI and hit from T.J. Rivera; and two more hits from Jose Reyes.

“Guys are taking a good approach,” Bruce said. “They are going to the plate with a plan.”

That plan is patience, said manager Terry Collins.

“It’s not going up there looking for a walk,” Collins said. “It’s looking for the pitch you can hit.”

And, if that pitch doesn’t come, then there’s nothing wrong with a walk. The Mets drew seven walks, of which two scored. The Mets also had two hit batters that scored, and another run who reached on an error. That’s five gift runs.

GSELLMAN GETS WIN: Robert Gsellman won his second straight decision despite not pitching very effectively. Gsellman gave up three runs on eight hits, no walks and two strikeouts in five innings.

Gsellman’s short stint again forced the Mets to go into their bullpen, using five relievers, Paul Sewald working the last two innings.

Collins acknowledged his bullpen faces being overworked, and said he’ll try to limit them to an inning apiece.

CESPEDES UPDATE: Alderson said Yoenis Cespedes is making progress with his left hamstring and will return to New York Monday for further tests. Alderson said the tests will hopefully ascertain why he’s susceptible to muscle pulls.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY WILLIE: Today marked the 86th birthday for Willie Mays, arguably the games’ greatest living player.

Mays, who broke in with the New York Giants in 1951, and after a Hall of Fame career forged mostly in San Francisco, was traded to the Mets in 1972 and played in the 1973 World Series.

Mays retired with a career .302 average, 3,283 hits, 660 homers, 1,903 RBI, 338 stolen bases and a .941 OPS.

Mays is a two-time MVP, 24-time All-Star and a 12-time Gold Glove Award winner.

UP NEXT: Matt Harvey (2-2) enters Sunday’s series finale after giving up six or more runs in consecutive starts for the first time in his career. Jose Urena (0-0) will start for the Marlins.