Nov 09

2011 Player Review: Angel Pagan

John Delcos of Newyorkmetsreport.com and Joe DeCaro of Metsmerizedonline.com will be doing more and more projects together with the goal of merging two successful blogs in the hope of giving our readers everything they’ll need in covering the Mets. Continuing our review of the 2011 Mets, today we take a look at Angel Pagan.

ANGEL PAGAN

THE SKINNY: You look at this guy and wonder why he’s not better with his physical tools. Pagan appeared to have a breakout year in 2010 when he hit .290 with 11 homers, 69 RBI and 32 steals. In 101 less at-bats last season Pagan hit four fewer homers with 13 less RBI. Not only were his numbers off, but he regressed in his defense and decisions on the bases. This is not a fundamentally sound player.

REASONS TO KEEP HIM: The Mets are thin in the outfield, don’t have many options on the minor league level and don’t figure to get any help in the free-agent or trade markets. … Should Jose Reyes leave, the Mets don’t have any leadoff options.

REASONS TO LET HIM GO: He could get up to $5 million in arbitration, which is a lot considering his production. … After last summer, it appears 2010 was a fluke. … Is there any reason to believe he’ll be better?

JOHN’S TAKE: The word is the Mets will tender Pagan so this might all be a moot point. I would still rather them take the gamble with Grady Sizemore, or if nothing else, see what somebody else can do. The Mets aren’t loaded with outfield options, but if Pagan produces as he did last year, he’s not offering much.

For a team wanting to get better defensively and fundamentally, Pagan doesn’t bring much to the table. Defensively, he doesn’t judge balls well and has a below average arm. In 2010 it appeared he was ready to take over centerfield, but I don’t see that anymore. For all his speed, his .322 on-base percentage is poor and his strikeouts-walks ratio is roughly 2-to-1. Let him go and move on.

JOE’S TAKE: The strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde or so it would seem where Angel Pagan is concerned. A year ago fans were clamoring for Pagan to replace Carlos Beltran in center field for his defensive exploits and some even mentioned him in the same breath as David Wright for his offensive showing in 2010. Gulp.

Pagan was a big letdown in 2011. He got off to an atrocious start at the plate to start the season batting .159 in April before hitting the DL with an oblique injury and missing nearly a month. His bat looked great when he returned, but that was offset by big declines on defense and base-running.

Pagan is proving himself to be wildly inconsistent and that’s usually the sign of a platoon player or even worse – a fourth outfielder. Is it smart for this front office to pay $5 million for such a player when the utilities at Citi Field are in danger of being turned off? Probably not, but they will anyway. It’s not like they have any better options.

One year at the helm and the new Mets caretakers now have less center field depth than last November. That means they will have to keep Pagan, but that doesn’t mean you have to like it. These are strange times in Flushing.

Nov 02

They should take a risk.

The Mets have made a string of bad signings when it comes to aging, injured, unproductive  or otherwise scarred players. Moises Alou, Julio Franco, Oliver Perez, Luis Castillo and Guillermo Mota. We could spend all day adding to the list.

SIZEMORE: Worth a risk.

It isn’t a great free-agent market, but there’s a name on the list worth rolling the dice with despite his recent injury history. The Cleveland Indians failed to exercise their option on outfielder Grady Sizemore, who, at 29, was once one of the game’s blossoming stars, but only played in 210 games the past three seasons.

A gamble, no question, but a thought keeps running through my head: What if he pans out?

Burdened by knee and abdominal injuries the past three years, Sizemore hit just .234 last summer, but prior to that was a three time All-Star and two-time Gold Glove Award winner. That’s a substantial resume; certainly better than any other Mets’ outfielder.

Continue reading

Aug 15

Decisions to be made as Mets begin series in San Diego.

Lucas Duda is at first base tonight in San Diego, but manager Terry Collins said that might change soon and he could be moved to right field for the rest of the season.

With the Mets skidding and now four games under .500 and 11.5 games behind in the wild-card hunt with four teams to jump and two games from the cellar, what was expected is being realized and we’re on the slow slide into winter.

It’s time the Mets’ decisions are made with 2012 in mind.

A couple of decisions involve Duda and Ike Davis. The expectation is Davis will play first base next season, but his ankle is a question. The current stance is to wait several weeks before deciding on whether microfracture surgery will be necessary.

The injury has not improved, and as with Carlos Beltran, there’s a strong possibility surgery will eventually be needed. The healing time for this surgery, as it was with Beltran, is often lengthy and waiting another month only puts him behind that much in his rehab.

That’s why the surgery decision should be made sooner rather than later.

If Davis comes back he’ll play first, the logical place to play Duda would be in right field. Duda has not played there enough to present a big enough window to prove he’s that answer.

That’s why, with Nick Evans capable of playing first, Duda should be in the outfield for as much as possible.

If Duda busts out in right – as Daniel Murphy did in left a couple of years ago – the Mets would want to know that know that before starting their off-season shopping.

The Mets are also in position now to make decisions on five roster slots. Jason Bay, Chris Capuano, D.J. Carrasco, Willie Harris and Angel Pagan have already cleared waivers, meaning they can be traded to any team until the end of the month. Teams routinely put players on waivers to ascertain interest. It also indicates a willingness by the Mets to deal these players.

Bay, we know, because of his gagging contract, isn’t going anywhere. However, Capuano and Pagan could provide value to a contender. Based on their performance so far, the Mets must have a sense of what they want to do next year. If there’s limited interest in bringing them back, then they should get what they can for them.

 

Jul 26

Reaction to prospect of non-tendering Pagan.

I chuckled this afternoon when I read an account suggesting the Mets could non-tender Angel Pagan this winter after this disappointing season. Pagan has not built on last year’s strong showing, but that hardly means the Mets are looking to dump him. If they were, they’d be shopping him now, but aren’t.

PAGAN: Odds say he'll stay.

Pagan is making $3.5 million this year and arbitration eligible. It isn’t as if he’ll break the Mets’ bank this winter.

The Mets are precariously think in the outfield now, and will only get thinner once Carlos Beltran is traded. Fernando Martinez is hardly proven he’s ready to play full time next year, let alone stay healthy.

Jason Bay has a spot in left because he has a contract that can’t be traded and maybe they’ll give Lucas Duda a chance in right. Who’s going to play center all season? Jason Pridie? Scott Hairston? Hardly.

Pagan has been a disappointment, but showed us something last summer to warrant another chance. Of course, all of this would be a moot point if the Mets signed a free-agent outfielder or traded for B.J. Upton.

It’s not happening. Expect to see Pagan again in 2012.

May 06

Pagan still ailing; out indefinitely.

They wouldn’t be the Mets without a bit of bad news.

PAGAN: Still hurting. No timetable on return.

Angel Pagan was supposed to be activated tomorrow, but is reporting pain in his left oblique muscle and returned to New York today to be examined. The team said he’ll be out indefinitely.

“Knowing we were hoping that he would be here tomorrow, he just felt that he wasn’t ready for that,’’ Mets manager Terry Collins said today.

Pagan went on the DL, April 22, with a strained left oblique.

Jason Pridie has been playing centerfield, and has done well defensively, but does not pose the offensive threat of Pagan. The Mets’ offense has been stagnant all season, and Pagan has not lived up to the expectations after his break out year in 2010.

Pagan started the season batting second behind Jose Reyes, and the Mets have unsuccessfully used several players to fill that void.