May 31

Time to get rid of Perez.

PEREZ: Time to cut ties.

The fear is there, but is it any worse than the embarrassment?

The fear is the Mets will cut loose Oliver Perez and he’ll find out what ails him under another pitching coach – maybe worse, it might be somebody in the NL East or The Jacket.

But, is that any worse than the embarrassment of watching Perez make a mockery of the concept of teamwork and force the Mets to play with what is a 24-man roster because of his refusal to accept repeated requests to go to the minor leagues to attempt to iron out his problems?

I would love to see the Mets attempt to suspend Perez for his selfishness for his unwillingness to make himself better, and label it conduct detrimental to the team. If an athlete doesn’t condition himself, doesn’t work out, then the team has some recourse. How is this not the same? How is refusing to go where you’ll get work different?

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May 28

Mets: On the road again.

MANUEL: Needs to figure out road woes

After another successful homestand – and it doesn’t get much better than a shutout sweep of the Phillies – the Mets hit the road to Milwaukee and San Diego.

Bizarre scheduling, yes, but nonetheless another obstacle for the Mets and challenge for manager Jerry Manuel. The whispers have eased about his job, but if they continue to stumble away from Citi Field could easily resurface.

This trip is one letter away from a trap, in that the Mets must guard against the inevitable letdown after beating the Yankees and Phillies. Milwaukee has the worst home record, but hasn’t always been an easy place to play for the Mets and the Padres have a good team.

The Mets are bearing down on the Phillies for the NL East lead, but they are still only a few games over .500 and have shown little ability thus far at winning on the road.

A baseball season is long and arduous. It is about sustaining power and that’s something we haven’t yet seen this year.

Aug 10

Sit Beltran; try to move Delgado.

At this stage of the game, and there is little game left for the 2009 New York Mets. We know they aren’t going to catch the Philadelphia Phillies, and they have to leapfrog almost the entire National League to have a puncher’s chance at a wild card.

They must start to make moves with 2010 in mind, and at the top of that list is to shut down Carlos Beltran and seriously evaluate the need for surgery. If Beltran does eventually need surgery, wouldn’t it be better to have it done now rather than October or November?

BELTRAN: Let him rest.

BELTRAN: Let him rest.


Should he get it now, he’ll have an extra three months to rehab, and Padres outfielder Brian Giles, who underwent the procedure microfracture surgery, said he’ll need every day.

“I would let it calm down and be ready for next year, having gone through what I went through,” Giles told reporters over the weekend. “There’s a lot of risk with this injury, especially with a young player like him. It could affect him for a long period of time.

“I rehabbed my butt off. I’ve never worked so hard to get ready for a season.”

Beltran is not soft nor is he a slacker, however, rehabbing is tough work and he’ll need the time to overcome the inevitable setbacks and slow points.

With little to play for this season, the Mets can’t afford Beltran risking further injury. Or eating a lot of time then opting for surgery. And, what is there is a problem with surgery or a longer than anticipated rehab? The extra time gained by doing it now would be essential.

Why push him for no reason?

As far as Delgado is concerned, the Mets aren’t going to offer him arbitration, which he’d obviously accept. They would be better off spending the money elsewhere, and the Mets do have holes that need plugging.

They’d be better off getting something and ridding themselves of the financial obligation. Daniel Murphy, which currently lacks the power needed for first base, could further develop as a hitter for the remainder of this year and next. While Murphy might not be the long-range answer at first base, he plays the position well enough defensively to where the Mets won’t be hurt with him there next season.

With at least two starters, left field, bullpen help and bench depth, first base is NOT an immediate priority. Murphy is good enough to stick there for another year. Plus, his lack of power should, or could, be made up with Beltran’s healthy return, David Wright’s comeback from the power Twilight Zone, and possibly the addition of an outfielder.

Apr 13

METS CHAT ROOM: Game #7; The doors open.

The new home of the Mets.

The new home of the Mets.

Finally, the doors to Citi Field are open for business. A new era in New York baseball history begins tonight with the Mets and Padres in Queens.

From first, second and third glances, this is a beautiful ballpark. We’re all trying to see how it plays, but we won’t know until the weather gets warmer. Plenty of quirks, nooks and crannies in the outfield for some weird bounces meaning you can expect a lot of triples and maybe and inside-the-parker or two for Jose Reyes.

This is supposed to be a pitcher’s park, but the overhang in right could be generous to Carloses Delgado and Beltran.

It should be a busy night. I’ll live blog, of course, but until game time if you want to note your favorite Opening Day memories, this is the place to do it.

Here’s the line-up:
J Reyes SS
D Murphy LF
D Wright 3B
C Delgado 1B
C Beltran CF
R Church RF
B Schneider C
L Castillo 2B
M Pelfrey P

Feb 11

Let it stand ….

SHEA: Honor its legacy.

SHEA: Honor its legacy.

There is one remaining wall of what was Shea Stadium that’s still standing. I know it won’t happen, because such decisions are never made on the fly, but I’d like to see it remain standing. It would make a great gesture to the past.

However, the Mets could still honor their Shea history by outlining a replica of the playing field in the parking lot and denote where some of the most memorable plays occurred with statues. Such of Seaver on the mound when he struck out 19 Padres, or Buckner, or the Swododa and Agee catches, of Cleon catching the final out of the 69 Series.

In Atlanta, the Braves have a replica of an outfield wall and mark where Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s record, so it’s not like this hasn’t been done before.