Jan 03

Wonder If Mets Regret Signing Cespedes Now?

Congratulations to those who took the under of four days as the time it would take for me to rip Mets’ GM Sandy Alderson for spending $110 million for Yoenis Cespedes.

However, it’s not something new sparked by recent talk of the Mets being in financial distress or only have $10 million left to spend for next year.

CESPEDES: Think Mets regret him now? (AP)

CESPEDES: Think Mets regret him now? (AP)

That they only have that much remaining in their budget stems from several factors, beginning with owner Fred Wilpon still reeling financially from the Ponzi scandal. It also includes the Wilpon’s reported reluctance to spend, or should I say, history of spending foolishly.

For all the talk about Alderson being such a smart general manager, there were so many reasons why Cespedes was such a bad signing.

First, with the Mets under such financial stress, and with so many future monetary obligations and gaping holes, $110 million was too much to spend on one player, especially if that player wasn’t going to put them over the top, something I wrote after the 2015 World Series.

Secondly, there is the nagging question: If this guy is so good, why would three previous teams trade him? If you’re considered to be a centerpiece player, teams would want to keep you.

There is also the matter of Cespedes’ injury history, his reputation of hustling only when the matter suits him, and his diva tendencies.

Readers of this site know I’ve never been a fan of Cespedes for the above reasons with the money being the ultimate factor. The Mets have too many holes to fill, and $29 million over the next two years and $29.5 million in three years would have gone a long way to fill them.

For somebody supposedly as smart as Alderson, one would have thought he would have figured that out. So, if you’re out there on Opening Day and wonder why the Mets’ roster looks like it does today, just look out to left field.

Whether Cespedes is there or not, you’ll have your answer.

 

Dec 22

Wilpon Has No Reason To Resent Yankees

I admit, I laughed out loud when I read The Post’s article on how Mets owner Fred Wilpon was “irate’’ after hearing about the Yankees’ acquisition of Giancarlo Stanton in a trade with Miami.

Anything the Yankees do money wise paints the Mets in a bad, if not embarrassing light, because it highlights their penny-pinching ways and reluctance to make any high-profile moves.

WILPON: No reason to be angry at Yanks. (Getty)

WILPON: No reason to be angry at Yanks. (Getty)

Wilpon doesn’t believe the Yankees can sustain their spending, which is what envious owners have said since George Steinbrenner purchased the team from CBS in the early 1970s.

It’s a foolish belief.

I don’t buy the Wilpons are afraid to spend, because after all, their Opening Day payroll last season was $154 million. That’s post-Ponzi spending, mind you. But, now there appears a reluctance

The problem is the Mets don’t spend wisely and they’ve been stung by their last three $100-million plus contracts – Yoenis Cespedes, David Wright and Johan Santana – were injured, as is their vaunted rotation.

Even though the Mets are two years removed from the World Series – and the Yankees were last there in 2009 – the latter is a lot closer to returning than the former. And, that was even before the Stanton trade, and even if they don’t get Gerit Cole from the Pirates.

Instead, the news this offseason about the dysfunctional Mets have made a franchise icon – Ed Kranepool – unwelcome, but have re-hired former GM Omar Minaya back to act as a special assistant to GM Sandy Alderson.

Both are head-scratching moves, but what isn’t was hearing of Fred Wilpon’s ire directed at the Yankees.

That’s something he has control over.

Dec 20

Mets Might As Well Keep Harvey

I have advocated the Mets trade Matt Harvey for several years now and still believe if they should jump on any worthwhile trade offer. I just think those ideas are gone and he’s not going anywhere because his trade value has never been lower and the Mets have their reasons for wanting to keep him.

HARVEY: Why not the pen? (AP)

HARVEY: No option but to keep him. (AP)

Harvey’s value is down because he hasn’t pitched well in two years, because of a combination of injuries and simply stinking up the joint. A shoulder injury sapped his velocity as well as his command and movement. With the decline in all three, his confidence has been shot since Game 5 of the 2015 World Series when he selfishly lobbied manager Terry Collins to stay in for the ninth.

Harvey is damaged goods. Teams won’t give up established talent or promising prospects for somebody who’ll be a free agent after the 2018 season. It just won’t happen.

Even so, the Mets have to keep Harvey because of the health concerns surrounding Steven Matz, Zack Wheeler, Seth Lugo, Robert Gsellman and even Noah Syndergaard. The Mets’ vaunted rotation hasn’t yet – over five years – made a complete cycle, and won’t again this season because either Matz or Wheeler won’t be ready by Opening Day.

Somebody will go down for the Mets this summer. It’s the way of the world and Harvey will have to fill the void. The Mets aren’t likely to sign a veteran arm this winter so they’ll need Harvey.

The Mets’ best chance to get something for Harvey is for him to get off to a strong – and healthy – start and trade him in late July. After that, well, I still believe Harvey will walk after next season.

 

Dec 14

How Big A Step Back Did Mets Take Last Summer?

In many circles, the Mets were favorites to reach the World Series in 2017, and by most accounts, injuries derailed those aspirations. They finished manager Terry Collins’ last season as manager 22 games below .500 after scuttling their roster at the deadline.

That seems to be a lot of ground to make up even after adding depth to their bullpen with the free-agent signing of Anthony Swarzak to a two-year deal.

Several reviews of the Mets’ Winter Meetings’ needs mention a set-up reliever, and outfielder/first baseman and second baseman as to what is on GM Sandy Alderson’s shopping list, and cite Addison Reed, Jay Bruce and Neil Walker by name.

The Mets traded all three last summer for a group of relievers that might not make the Opening Day roster.

Surely, if the Mets kept all three, and still added Swarzak, they might still be regarded as a serious contender, even with the health questions surrounding Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes.

The best chance to re-sign a free agent is to make sure he doesn’t leave in the first place, but that requires an ability to spend. Whether they bring back Bruce, all three, or stun us and sign a name player, it will cost money. The bottom line is the Mets have to spend it if they are going to win. That is the idea, isn’t it?

Dec 11

Why Are Mets Even At The Winter Meetings?

Why are the Mets even at the Winter Meetings? We knew all along they wouldn’t land Giancarlo Stanton, but even Adam Lind might be out of their league. The Mets’ plan is to wait for the price to drop for a quality reliever or a second baseman.

So basically, what the Mets’ roster looks like today is pretty much what it will look like on Opening Day.

STANTON: Mystery is over. (Getty)

STANTON: Mystery is over. (Getty)

GM Sandy Alderson said the Mets wanted bullpen help, but Brandon Morrow and Luke Gregerson are now off the board – at $11 million a season which the Mets were never going to pay – and reportedly their first target Bryan Shaw wants three years, which they’ll never give.

The Mets’ plan is to wait out the market and hope somebody falls into their lap.

“We are not going to chase players. There are a lot of guys out there,’’ Alderson said. “We think there are some values out there to the extent the market gets overheated. I don’t think we will jump into the inferno, but we want to improve our bullpen.’’

Yeah, and I want to win the lottery.

Ian Kinsler and Jason Kipnis have been mentioned as possible trade targets, but Alderson said: “Our farm system right now is not brimming with prospects, so in that sense, making a trade isn’t as attractive. On the other hand, making a trade, giving up a minimal number of talented players for maybe someone who can help us on a shorter deal or what have you, there are pluses and minuses to each approach.’’

What that means, is the Mets are willing to trade but only if they don’t have to give up anything.

So, they aren’t going to sign any free agents and won’t make any trades. What they will do is hope for their pitchers to get healthy.

Yeah, that sounds like a plan.