May 01

Mets Wrap: Gsellman Gives Innings; Offense Awakens

Robert Gsellman came out of nowhere last year to save the Mets season after Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz went down. They are counting on him again this season – especially with Noah Syndergaard out indefinitely – and gave them five innings tonight.

Given six runs, Gsellman gave up five runs on six hits in a 77-pitch five innings to get the win in a 7-5 victory. Not great numbers, but the most important stat was getting ten ground ball outs.

GSELLMAN: Gives important innings. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Gives important innings. (AP)

“I got a lot of ground balls today,” Gsellman told reporters. “I had my sinker down in the zone.”

Gsellman and Seth Lugo picked up the Mets last season after injuries cost them Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz. With Lugo and Syndergaard on the disabled list, Gsellman will have to pitch better and they’ll need innings from Rafael Montero, who is scheduled to start Friday.

OFFENSE WAKENS: The Mets offense came alive in the first two games of the Washington series, and did so again tonight.

Michael Conforto homered to lead off the game and drove in three runs. Most importantly, the Mets strung together five hits in a five-run fourth.

“Some days the offense is going to have to carry us,” manager Terry Collins told reporters.The best part of that inning is that none of the hits were homers.

The best part of the inning is none of the hits were homers.

REED REBOUNDS: Another bright spot was Addison Reed, who pitched so well last season, but has been hit hard lately, giving up four homers in April.

He looked good last night, but after giving up a leadoff single to Matt Kemp he shut down the Braves for the rest of the eighth inning.

REYES HOMERS AGAIN: Collins said the other day he’s considering moving Jose Reyes up in the batting order. It won’t happen because Conforto keeps raking, leading off the game with a homer.

Reyes extended his hitting streak to seven games with his third homer in that span. Traditionally, Reyes hits them in bunches and then goes during a stretch where he tries to hit them and slips into a tailspin.

We’ll see what happens.

UP NEXT: Matt Harvey (2-1, 4.25) was moved up on April 27 to replace Noah Syndergaard and gave up six runs in 4.1 innings and later said he wasn’t ready. Former Mets Cy Young Award winner R.A. Dickey (2-2, 3.80) will start for Atlanta.

ON DECK LATER TONIGHT: Some wins are more important than others.

May 01

MRI Results Reveal Bad News We Saw Coming; Alderson’s Decision To Start Syndergaard

UPDATED:  Adding GM Sandy Alderson comments at 6:30 p.m.

Who didn’t see this coming for the Mets?

When Noah Syndergaard refused an MRI exam after being diagnosed with biceps tendinitis, yet remained scheduled to pitch Sunday, it was figured the following could happen: a) he’d get roughed up by the Nationals, b) he’d still have arm soreness, c) that arm soreness would be deemed serious.Syndergaard hitting the trifecta, which happened today when an MRI at the Hospital

Syndergaard hit the trifecta, which happened today when an MRI at the Hospital of Special Surgery revealed a partial tear of his right lat muscle. He was immediately placed on the 10-day disabled list with no timetable for his return.

SYNDERGAARD: Walks away, wheels turning. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Mets get bad news they feared. (AP)

As a measure of reference, Steven Matz missed two months in 2015 with a similar injury.

The news came less than a week after Yoenis Cespedes was rushed back into the lineup and re-pulled his left hamstring and placed on the disabled list and tempered any positive feelings from winning the first two games of their weekend series against the Nationals.

Oh yeah, Syndergaard’s injury in Sunday’s 23-5 rout also closed their hellish 10-14 April. One thing Syndergaard’s MRI did not do is answer the questions of responsibility.

Mets GM Sandy Alderson said “It was my decision for him to pitch.” He said it was based on input from several sources, including Syndergaard’s.

Syndergaard’s refusal to take the MRI is beyond comprehension as the mighty Thor must have dropped that hammer on his head. You’re a major league pitcher whose livelihood is based on the health of your arm and yet you refuse an exam that could reveal a problem?

I’m waiting … go ahead, tell me how smart that is. And, while you’re at it, spare me talk there is a difference between a lat and biceps so an MRI would have shown nothing, although that’s how Alderson tried to spin things.

However, there’s no telling how the muscles interact. Syndergaard was overthrowing in the second inning, muscling up to throw harder. Was this to compensate for something bothering his biceps? And you is to say an MRI wouldn’t have discovered some wear – but not yet a tear – in his lat muscle?

Alderson did admit “anything is possible,” when asked if Syndergaard was overthrowing to compensate for the previous discomfort in his arm. Alderson also admitted it was conceivable Syndergaard bulked up too much in the offseason, adding 15 pounds by weight lifting.

That leads to the further question of whether – and how closely – Syndergaard’s offseason conditioning program was monitored.

We can’t ignore Alderson has to be the adult here. His comment, “I can’t tie him down and throw him in the tube” could become the epitaph on the tombstone of this season. Alderson said a team can’t put a player who is not injured on the disabled list, but he can tell Syndergaard that he either takes the MRI or goes on the disabled list.

That’s part of protecting his players, something manager Terry Collins and pitching coach Dan Warthen, didn’t do a good job of either.

Didn’t anybody in that dugout notice this valuable asset struggling, and this has nothing to do with the radar gun still showing the high 90s? Weren’t those five runs in the first inning a tip off?

When Alderson was hired, Chief Operating Officer Jeff Wilpon promised a complete evaluation of the club’s medical operations. That hasn’t been done, unless of course, you consider letting the players call the shots.

 

May 01

Today’s Question: What Will MRI Bring?

Today’s question is what we’ve all been wondering for the past 24 hours: What are wthe results of Noah Syndergaard’s MRI taken this morning in New York?

Will the results give the Mets cause for a sigh of relief, or force them to ease their grip on the rope to their season or let go of it entirely?

SYNDERGAARD: Gets crucial MRI today. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Gets crucial MRI today. (AP)

The Mets should get the results today, and if they are bad, count on them getting a second opinion. That’s not to be confused with second-guessing; of which there will be a lot.

By Syndergaard, for turning down an MRI last week. By GM Sandy Alderson, for not being the adult in the room and insisting upon it. By manager Terry Collins, for not pulling him Sunday in the first, if not refusing to start him in the first place.

I don’t care how Syndergaard felt when he threw in the bullpen. The bottom line is he already missed a start; he’s a pitcher who’ll never refuse the ball; and, Collins and Alderson should use their years of experience to protect the pitcher and perhaps their season.

The Mets stopped a potentially devastating losing streak by winning their first two games against the Nationals, but may have given back that momentum in foolish fashion.

Unless an MRI tells us differently.

Apr 30

Plenty Of Blame To Go Around In Syndergaard Fiasco

“MRI? MRI? I don’t need no stinkin’ MRI.” – Noah Syndergaard

As I wrote this morning, Noah Syndergaard’s refusal to take an MRI on his sore right arm – biceps tendinitis was the initial diagnosis – smacked of stupidity and arrogance, from both the pitcher and management.

As for Syndergaard, I get it, you think of yourself as the fictional superhero the media and fans label you and there’s the desire to show how tough you are. However, save it for Game 7 of the World Series, not Game 24 in April, when your team’s season and arguably your career, could be on the line.

SYNDERGAARD: Walks away, wheels turning. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Walks away, wheels turning. (AP)

Long before Syndergaard and the Mets were torched 23-5 by the Nationals today, it has been a bad week for the ace, who was first scratched with what was called a “tired arm’’ Wednesday and upgraded to biceps tendinitis the following day, one in which he ripped into a club official in the clubhouse and was subsequently called out in the press.

Finally, there was Syndergaard’s refusal to get an MRI, saying at the time: “I think I know my body best. I’m pretty in tune with my body, and that’s exactly why I refused to take the MRI.”

So, Noah, what’s your body telling you now as you head to New York for the MRI tomorrow morning you refused?

Mets GM Sandy Alderson told reporters it is a “possible lat strain, which may or may not be related to his original problem … we’ll know more after he’s examined.”

While the biceps and lat aren’t physically connected, even so, why push it? There was no mistaking everything about Syndergaard’s performance today was not right. Yes, he threw 100 mph., early, but his command was off and he gave up five runs in the first inning.

Then, it looked as if Syndergaard sensed something wasn’t right and muscled up on his pitches as to throw harder in the second. When he reached under his armpit after throwing a strike to Bryce Harper with one out, you knew the second-guess wheels were spinning. And, not just from Syndergaard.

Alderson, who defiantly said, “I can’t strap him down and throw him in the tube,” after Syndergaard brushed back the MRI the way he would a hitter crowding the plate. Alderson didn’t address whether he should have insisted Syndergaard get the MRI or prohibited from pitching until he did. He also didn’t revisit the issue with his pitcher.

“We didn’t get into that,” Alderson said. “I didn’t think it was necessary at that particular time. He understands something is going on now.”

As for Collins, considering what Syndergaard has physically been going through, it had to be apparent to him the pitcher he wasn’t right in the first.

Collins had to make the decision to pull Syndergaard early if not give him the ball in the first place.

Nobody is blameless in this.

ON DECK LATER TODAY: Mets Wrap: Duda not ready.

Apr 30

Today’s Question: Why Does Alderson Let Inmates Run Asylum?

As of now, Noah Syndergaard remains on to start against the Nationals’ Joe Ross in the series finale today in Washington.

SYNDERGAARD: Not smart. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Not smart. (AP)

Syndergaard said he felt fine during his bullpen session Friday and eschewed an MRI scheduled for him. Because GM Sandy Alderson acquiesced to Syndergaard’s prima donna attitude this week – which included berating a club official in the clubhouse for not keeping reporters away – we have an answer to today’s question: Who exactly is running the asylum?

In 2015, Alderson bowed to Matt Harvey and never established a definitive innings limit. It wasn’t until Harvey’s agent mentioned it in the press that it became an issue.

Syndergaard was bothered for much of last season with a bone spur in his elbow and was scratched from a start Wednesday with biceps tendinitis. An MRI seemed a logical next step, but Syndergaard said no, which is his right.

“I’m pretty in tune with my body,” said Syndergaard. “That’s exactly why I refused to take the MRI. I knew there was nothing happening in there.”

Alderson meekly told reporters, “I can’t strap him down and throw him in the tube.”

All too often the Mets get heat for not properly handling injuries. Despite wanting the MRI, Alderson can’t skate this time, either. Yes, Syndergaard can refuse medical treatment if he’s that stupid, but Alderson is supposed to be the adult in the room.

“No, Noah, you don’t have to have the MRI if you don’t want,” should have been Alderson’s response. “But, if you don’t we’re putting you on the DL and you won’t pitch until you do.”

Syndergaard is big and strong and probably nothing will happen to him, but can he be that naïve – not to mention arrogant – as to put his own health, and possibly the Mets’ season on the line?