May 01

Today’s Question: What Will MRI Bring?

Today’s question is what we’ve all been wondering for the past 24 hours: What are wthe results of Noah Syndergaard’s MRI taken this morning in New York?

Will the results give the Mets cause for a sigh of relief, or force them to ease their grip on the rope to their season or let go of it entirely?

SYNDERGAARD: Gets crucial MRI today. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Gets crucial MRI today. (AP)

The Mets should get the results today, and if they are bad, count on them getting a second opinion. That’s not to be confused with second-guessing; of which there will be a lot.

By Syndergaard, for turning down an MRI last week. By GM Sandy Alderson, for not being the adult in the room and insisting upon it. By manager Terry Collins, for not pulling him Sunday in the first, if not refusing to start him in the first place.

I don’t care how Syndergaard felt when he threw in the bullpen. The bottom line is he already missed a start; he’s a pitcher who’ll never refuse the ball; and, Collins and Alderson should use their years of experience to protect the pitcher and perhaps their season.

The Mets stopped a potentially devastating losing streak by winning their first two games against the Nationals, but may have given back that momentum in foolish fashion.

Unless an MRI tells us differently.

Apr 30

Plenty Of Blame To Go Around In Syndergaard Fiasco

“MRI? MRI? I don’t need no stinkin’ MRI.” – Noah Syndergaard

As I wrote this morning, Noah Syndergaard’s refusal to take an MRI on his sore right arm – biceps tendinitis was the initial diagnosis – smacked of stupidity and arrogance, from both the pitcher and management.

As for Syndergaard, I get it, you think of yourself as the fictional superhero the media and fans label you and there’s the desire to show how tough you are. However, save it for Game 7 of the World Series, not Game 24 in April, when your team’s season and arguably your career, could be on the line.

SYNDERGAARD: Walks away, wheels turning. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Walks away, wheels turning. (AP)

Long before Syndergaard and the Mets were torched 23-5 by the Nationals today, it has been a bad week for the ace, who was first scratched with what was called a “tired arm’’ Wednesday and upgraded to biceps tendinitis the following day, one in which he ripped into a club official in the clubhouse and was subsequently called out in the press.

Finally, there was Syndergaard’s refusal to get an MRI, saying at the time: “I think I know my body best. I’m pretty in tune with my body, and that’s exactly why I refused to take the MRI.”

So, Noah, what’s your body telling you now as you head to New York for the MRI tomorrow morning you refused?

Mets GM Sandy Alderson told reporters it is a “possible lat strain, which may or may not be related to his original problem … we’ll know more after he’s examined.”

While the biceps and lat aren’t physically connected, even so, why push it? There was no mistaking everything about Syndergaard’s performance today was not right. Yes, he threw 100 mph., early, but his command was off and he gave up five runs in the first inning.

Then, it looked as if Syndergaard sensed something wasn’t right and muscled up on his pitches as to throw harder in the second. When he reached under his armpit after throwing a strike to Bryce Harper with one out, you knew the second-guess wheels were spinning. And, not just from Syndergaard.

Alderson, who defiantly said, “I can’t strap him down and throw him in the tube,” after Syndergaard brushed back the MRI the way he would a hitter crowding the plate. Alderson didn’t address whether he should have insisted Syndergaard get the MRI or prohibited from pitching until he did. He also didn’t revisit the issue with his pitcher.

“We didn’t get into that,” Alderson said. “I didn’t think it was necessary at that particular time. He understands something is going on now.”

As for Collins, considering what Syndergaard has physically been going through, it had to be apparent to him the pitcher he wasn’t right in the first.

Collins had to make the decision to pull Syndergaard early if not give him the ball in the first place.

Nobody is blameless in this.

ON DECK LATER TODAY: Mets Wrap: Duda not ready.

Apr 30

Today’s Question: Why Does Alderson Let Inmates Run Asylum?

As of now, Noah Syndergaard remains on to start against the Nationals’ Joe Ross in the series finale today in Washington.

SYNDERGAARD: Not smart. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Not smart. (AP)

Syndergaard said he felt fine during his bullpen session Friday and eschewed an MRI scheduled for him. Because GM Sandy Alderson acquiesced to Syndergaard’s prima donna attitude this week – which included berating a club official in the clubhouse for not keeping reporters away – we have an answer to today’s question: Who exactly is running the asylum?

In 2015, Alderson bowed to Matt Harvey and never established a definitive innings limit. It wasn’t until Harvey’s agent mentioned it in the press that it became an issue.

Syndergaard was bothered for much of last season with a bone spur in his elbow and was scratched from a start Wednesday with biceps tendinitis. An MRI seemed a logical next step, but Syndergaard said no, which is his right.

“I’m pretty in tune with my body,” said Syndergaard. “That’s exactly why I refused to take the MRI. I knew there was nothing happening in there.”

Alderson meekly told reporters, “I can’t strap him down and throw him in the tube.”

All too often the Mets get heat for not properly handling injuries. Despite wanting the MRI, Alderson can’t skate this time, either. Yes, Syndergaard can refuse medical treatment if he’s that stupid, but Alderson is supposed to be the adult in the room.

“No, Noah, you don’t have to have the MRI if you don’t want,” should have been Alderson’s response. “But, if you don’t we’re putting you on the DL and you won’t pitch until you do.”

Syndergaard is big and strong and probably nothing will happen to him, but can he be that naïve – not to mention arrogant – as to put his own health, and possibly the Mets’ season on the line?

Apr 29

Today’s Question: Can Wheeler Encore DeGrom’s Effort?

Jacob deGrom pitched like an ace last night to ease the Mets’ hemorrhaging. Today’s question is obvious: Can Zack Wheeler duplicate that effort?

WHEELER: Pressure start for him. (AP)

WHEELER: Pressure start for him. (AP)

Wheeler is 1-2 after missing the last two years following Tommy John surgery. It’s not a great record, but he is coming off a strong seven-inning performance last weekend against Washington. Wheeler gave up four runs on four hits with six strikeouts while throwing 101 pitches.

After the Mets’ 7-5 victory Friday night, to keep the momentum going they need to win at least twice in this series and preferably sweep. If they lose the next two they’ll trail the Nationals by 8.5 games. There’s plenty of time to make that up, but two losses would mean giving away the momentum created by deGrom.

The Mets have long waited for their dream five-man rotation of Noah Syndergaard, deGrom, Matt Harvey, Steven Matz and Wheeler to dominate. However, the five have never gone one cycle in that rotation. That might not come until next year as when Matz is ready to come off the disabled list, Wheeler’s innings limit might sit him.

Apr 28

Today’s Question: What Next For Mets?

The Mets arrived in Washington last night 7.5 games behind the Nationals. They didn’t get that far behind them last season until July 29.

question-1969017__340First up will be the MRI results of Yoenis Cespedes‘ left hamstring that will reveal what we already know, it is serious and he’ll go on the disabled list. Tonight’s outfield will feature Michael Conforto, Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson.

They are hurting for offense, so perhaps they might pull the trigger and bring up Amed Rosario. Ironically, it would be at a time when Jose Reyes seems to be finding his swing.

Reyes homered Thursday and after said energy was needed and the Mets can’t afford to fall too deep in the standings. If the Mets are swept this weekend, they’ll be double-digit numbers behind heading into May and Panic City.

They could also bring up Sean Gilmartin, which would mean the disabled list for Noah Syndergaard.

Finally, and most importantly, is will they find the energy manager Terry Collins said they are lacking?

In each of the last two years, the Mets overcame long stretches of dismal hitting and sluggish play to reach the playoffs. The Mets listened to Collins then, but will his message sink in this time?