Dec 04

Why Would Bruce Return?

Published reports indicate the Mets are one of six teams interested in signing Jay Bruce. While Bruce said he’s open to returning to New York and playing first base, that’s probably a negotiating tactic. Why limit the field, which would decrease your value?

BRUCE: Why would he return? (AP)

BRUCE: Why would he return? (AP)

Most recently, Colorado and Seattle, have come into play, teams that offer great cities, but also complementary power in their lineups which would take pressure off Bruce of having to be the entire offense.

Plus, both teams are closer to reaching the playoffs than the Mets. If either, or any team, is willing to pay the $90 million over five years he is seeking – which the Mets are not – why would he return?

In coming back to the Mets, there’s potential of contending if the pitchers hold up physically. As of now, Jacob deGrom and possibly Noah Syndergaard, seem to be the only reliable starters.

The Mets, despite scuttling their offense for a handful of relievers last summer, are still searching for bullpen help. Whoever they sign will also have to play first. While Bruce said he’s willing, don’t forget he complained of back stiffness after a few games last year.

The Mets finished 22 games below .500 in 2017 and enter this season with a new manager and a myriad of questions and concerns, of which Bruce can only address one or two.

Unless the market completely dries up, or the Mets all of a sudden get giddy with their money, there’s little in the way of compelling reasons why Bruce would come back. It can’t be for sentimental reasons as he was booed after the coming here and traded away last year.

The best chance they had of bringing him back was to not trade him in the first place.

Dec 01

Mets Tender Contracts To Nine

As expected, the Mets tendered 2018 contracts to all nine of their arbitration-eligible players today. The list includes four of their projected starters and two back-end relievers.

Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Zack Wheeler were offered contracts, as were Jeurys Familia, AJ Ramos and Hansel Robles, catcher Travis d’Arnaud and infielder Wilmer Flores.

This action ensures these players will play for the Mets next season. Any arbitration-eligible player tendered to a contract must either accept the offer or go through an arbitration hearing.

All nine are expected to go through the arbitration process.

 

Nov 06

Free Agent Market Opens; Let The Penny-Pinching Begin

Assuming published reports are accurate and the Mets have roughly $35 million to spend this offseason, just where will the money go?

Well, since the deadline for extending a $17.4-million qualifying offer to Jose Reyes passed today – which would be half that amount – it’s safe to assume they won’t do too much this winter, at least not of the big-name variety.

REYES: No qualifying offer made. (AP)

REYES: No qualifying offer made. (AP)

From what I hear Jay Bruce might want, he’s too pricey for the Mets. So is Addison Reed, so there won’t be any reunions.

Dexter Fowler won’t happen. Mike Moustakas, Jake Arrieta, Lorenzo Cain, Wade Davis, Greg Holland, Lance Lynn and Alex Cobb, all of whom would look good in a Mets’ uniform, all received qualifying offers from their teams and have until Nov. 16 to accept. If they don’t, it’s unlikely the Mets will pursue because it would entail a compensatory draft pick.

The money the Mets figure to spend this winter will be with nine arbitration-eligible players: Jacob deGrom, Jeurys Familia, AJ Ramos and Noah Syndergaard will cost plenty; Travis d’Arnaud, Wilmer Flores, Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler are all important to the Mets; Hansel Robles you can have.

That’s eight players, and it won’t be hard to figure out – since the players usually win these things – that could add up to $35 million rather quickly, especially considering they’ve already earmarked $13.5 million to pick up the options for Asdrubal Cabrera and Jerry Blevins.

So, if the reported numbers are accurate, that leaves $21.5 million left to spend in the free-agent market, but much will go to arbitration.

 

 

Oct 26

How About Darling As Pitching Coach?

I don’t know who is on Mickey Callaway‘s short list of pitching coach candidates, so I felt compelled to offer a suggestion. This guy knows pitching and is familiar with Mets’ pitchers and their problems over the years. Plus, he’s a combination of old school with a knowledge of analytics, and has strong ties to the Mets.

I’ve never asked Ron Darling if he has any interest in coaching, but he brings so much to the table. The current Mets pitchers are familiar with Darling and I presume he has their respect. He knows where Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler have struggled and why they’ve been injured.

In addition, he could be a perfect buffer in helping Callaway get acclimated to New York. He could certainly help in bringing Callaway and his new staff together.

One thing I know about Darling after listening to him all these years is his disdain for walks, something that crippled Mets’ pitchers this season.

I don’t know what Callaway is thinking, but it’s worth putting a call into Darling to find out what he’s thinking.

Sep 25

Apple Doesn’t Rise On Record-Setting Homer

The Mets established a franchise record when Travis d’Arnaud hit the team’s 219th homer in the eighth inning. So, what accompanied the record-setting moment could best be described as “typical Mets’’ when the Home Run Apple failed to rise.

That prompted the scarce crowd to chant for the Apple, which resulted in a Bronx cheer when it finally was raised.

Just curious, but could the Apple have been damaged when Daniel Murphys homer struck the casing? It would have been apropos.

The homer gave the Mets a three-run lead, which turned out to be very important as the Braves scored twice in the ninth against Jeurys Familia.

Mets starters sharp: Chris Flexen’s line of four runs in five innings, looked worse than it really was. Three of those runs came in the sixth when Josh Smoker gave up those inherited runners, which was the decisive point in the 9-2 loss in Game 1 of the doubleheader.

What I don’t understand is why manager Terry Collins waited so long to replace Flexen. Why would Collins keep Flexen in the game to load the bases, with two of the runners coming on walks?

One criticism of Collins is that he has stuck with his starters too long, forcing the bullpen to enter with little-to-no wiggle room. Collins has to have a better understanding of how long his starters would pitch. He had to know Flexen wasn’t going to make it through the sixth after the leadoff hitter reached on a single.

In the second game, Seth Lugo struck out seven and gave up two hits in six scoreless innings.

Collins said Lugo will get another appearance to make another impression before the offseason, but wouldn’t say how.

If Collins sticks to the rotation order, it would be Saturday in Philadelphia, but he hasn’t defined how he’ll use Noah Syndergaard and Matt Harvey.