Mar 08

Mets Wrap: Syndergaard Off, Mets Win Anyway

Noah Syndergaard found out today what a lot of pitchers already know: Life can be tough when you can’t locate your fastball.

Today, the Mets’ prospect’s command was off as he gave up two runs on two hits and three walks in three innings in a game won, 3-2, over Detroit. The outing came five days after he gave up one hit in two scoreless innings against Atlanta.

Syndergaard’s fastball again topped out at 97 mph., but it’s not about how fast you throw it, but where you throw it.

In addition:

* Eric Young played second base and misplayed a grounder into a two-run single.

* The Mets’ defense included errors by second baseman Daniel Murphy and shortstop Ruben Tejada. The latter misplayed two other balls not ruled errors.

* Matt Clark, batting for Omar Quintanilla in the ninth, drove in two runs with a double.

Feb 27

Mets Wrap: Niese MRI Negative; Syndergaard Stars

The New York Mets, a team starving for good news, received some Thursday when left-hander Jon Niese’s MRI on his left shoulder came back negative.

Niese is expected to resume throwing this weekend, but his exhibition start scheduled for Tuesday will be pushed back.

Above all else, Niese received a scare that should tell the Mets starting pitching is fragile and they should be careful before they consider dealing what they have.

In addition:

Noah Syndergaard struck out five in two innings of an intrasquad game. He’s scheduled to make his first exhibition start Monday against Atlanta.

Eric Young, who has a strained side muscle, could be held out this weekend.

Bartolo Colon could throw Friday. Colon has a strained calf muscle and spent the day working out on a stationary bike.

* General manager Sandy Alderson said 90 victories is possible, reported The New York Daily News.

 

Feb 27

Syndergaard Stars In Intrasquad Game; Mets Shouldn’t Get Carried Away

The cheers were great, the performance was scintillating, but the New York Mets – and their often-frustrated fan base – shouldn’t get carried away and read too much into Noah Syndergaard’s performance in Thursday’s intrasquad game.

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

In Syndergaard’s first performance in the Mets’ camp, Syndergaard, throwing what manager Terry Collins calls “the hook from hell,’’ struck out five in two innings. He also gave up a run on four hits, but with no walks.

Not only was Syndergaard’s curveball working in fall-off-the-table fashion, but his 97 mph., fastball was sizzling.

“I felt pretty good out there. I kind of shocked myself a little bit,’’ Syndergaard told reporters Thursday in Port St. Lucie. “I wasn’t expecting that my first time out there.’’

Nor should the Mets expect that from him in Monday’s start against Atlanta; every time out at Triple-A Las Vegas; or when he finally is brought up in June. He’ll need time to develop into all what is expected of him.

“I didn’t think I was going to get the start, first of all,” Syndergaard said of Monday. “I’m excited, a little nervous at the same time. It’s the first time facing a real big-league lineup. I’m going to go out there and do what I can. It’s still a game. They’re still playing baseball out there.’’

Which is true, but baseball is also a game of emotions. Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler, despite their youth, have been able to keep their emotions in check. The Mets would like to see the same from Syndergaard.

That will be easier, of course, if he’s throwing that fastball in the upper 90s.

“How can you not like what you saw?’’ Collins said. “For heaven’s sake, I don’t know how hard he threw, but it was firm. Even in a game like this, you better get to the heater, because you don’t want to try to hit that curveball.

“Certainly everything you heard, you saw. You heard, ‘What a great arm.’ You got it. You heard, ‘He’s got a great presence,’ that he pounds the strike zone. He did that.’’

Of course, should Syndergaard cut down the Braves as he did his minor league teammates, there will be rumblings about cracking the rotation.

However, Collins and general manager Sandy Alderson should a turn a deaf ear and continue with the same plan they had last season for Wheeler.

ON DECK: Mets Wrap.

Feb 21

Three Mets Players to Watch This Spring Training

COLLINS: Issues to address.

The Mets begin their first full squad workout in St. Lucie on Saturday, February 22 and for us fans there’s nothing better than watching the news filter out of the camp, knowing the first day of the season is getting ever so closer.

Spring training usually sets the benchmark for how a team will perform in the regular season. New additions show off their talent, last year’s rookies return with confidence, old-timers find ways to hang on and those recovering from injury face the uncertainty of testing out their bodies once more.

It’s a fascinating time for baseball fans, but also for those who set the MLB odds for each team and try to predict who will be the division and wild card winners. As rosters begin to take shape in the next six weeks, every team goes into Opening Day in a tie for first place. The tough part will be staying there.

For the Mets, their 2014 journey begins tomorrow. The Mets have many issues ranging from the muddled situation at first base and the yet to be contested battles for the fifth spot in the rotation and who will be the leadoff hitter. But there are three more things to watch for in spring training:

1. Bartolo Colon needs to deliver

Ever since our ace underwent Tommy John surgery late last year – ruling him out for the entirety of 2014 – many are betting and wondering who will replace the majestic Matt Harvey. All eyes will be on Bartolo Colon who was signed to a two year deal worth $20 million and has been the front office’s solution to replacing Harvey’s loss in the rotation. While we all keep our fingers crossed and hope for improved command from Zack Wheeler and the mid-season debut of the promising Noah Syndergaard, the Mets need to hit big it with Colon – Alderson’s highest paid pitcher in four years. They’ll also need to see Dillon Gee and Jon Niese look like the pitchers we saw in the second half of last season.

2. Travis d’Arnaud must step up

I don’t know about you, but I’ve had my fill of articles and features on framing pitches, and I’m looking forward to articles on D’Arnaud mashing pitches. TDA didn’t get his billing at top catching prospect for getting one or two extra strike call per nine innings. The rookie catcher played 31 games in the close of last season, but often showed how pressure can get to him. Yet despite his poor form that saw him finish 2013 batting .202, d’Arnaud has the capabilities to be a solid performer in the Mets roster and must prove himself in spring training. At 25-years old it’s time to show-off the offensive package we’ve been hearing about for the last four years.

3. Chris Young against RHP

I’m not worried about Curtis Granderson, we all know what he can do. But as long as Chris Young is being handed an everyday job after a season that saw him bat .200 with a .280 OBP – both lower than Juan Lagares – he’s the man under the microscope.  What scares me more about him – aside from Billy Beane casting him away and proclaiming him a platoon player – is his horrendous .225 career batting average against right handed pitching in 2,825 plate appearances. Is that sample size big enough for you? He has declined every year since 2010 except for his strikeout rate, that continues to climb. He’s pushing a promising prospect to the bench, he better pay us back in spades.

Feb 20

Mets List: Top Ten Prospects

At least four of the New York Mets’ top ten prospects according to Baseball Prospectus are expected to play for the organization this season.

Baseball Prospectus, a website dealing with minor league prospects, to nobody’s surprise lists first pitcher Noah Syndergaard, whom manager Terry Collins said has a “hook from hell,’’ referring to the curveball to complement his 97 mph., fastball.

Here’s the list and their chances of playing for the Mets this season:

RHP Noah Syndergaard: As a Super Two, the Mets don’t foresee bringing up Syndergaard before June. Until then the Mets will use Daisuke Matsuzaka and/or John Lannan as the fifth starter.

C Travis d’Arnaud: Injuries derailed his opportunity last year. He goes into the season as the projected starter. The early returns were good on him defensively, but he needs to show something at the plate.

INF Wilmer Flores: He showed flashes of being able to hit, but the Mets must find a position for him. Manager Terry Collins left open the possibility of playing him at shortstop, but said he’ll likely open the season on the minor league level to get at-bats.

RHP Rafael Montero: As with Syndergaard, don’t expect to see him before June.

SS Amed Rosario: Was in the rookie year in 2013, and will be in Class A this season. He’s still at least three years away.

1B Dominic Smith: Last year’s first-round draft pick played for two Mets’ Rookie League teams last year and is expected to start the season in Single A. If he hits for the power expected of him, he could finish in Double A.

OF Cesar Puello: Is the Mets’ top outfield prospect outside of Juan Lagares. He hit .326 last year at Double A Binghamton and is expected to be in Triple A this season.

C Kevin Plawecki: Some scouts say he might have a higher upside than d’Arnaud. He’ll start the season in Double A.

CF Brandon Nimmo: One of Sandy Alderson’s draft picks. Hit .273 last season at Single A, which doesn’t warrant an immediate promotion.

RHP Marcos Molina: Has a 1.25 WHIP in two seasons of Rookie League ball. Could start there again or possibly in Single A.

Note: Each Thursday I plan to post a Mets’ related list.