Mar 14

DeGrom Ready; Mets Should Rest Ill Syndergaard

If spring training is all about getting ready for the season, it would be safe to conclude of all the Mets’ high-profile starters Jacob deGrom is the closest to being ready.

In three spring starts, he has given up one run in ten innings with 13 strikeouts, including six in four innings in today’s 2-1 victory over Houston. Now, who wouldn’t take that?

DeGROM: Ready. (AP)

DeGROM: Ready. (AP)

The best thing about deGrom today was his ability to pitch out of trouble. He walked and gave up a single to start the game, but pulled it together to strike out the side, including the last two in the high 90s.

DeGrom didn’t have his best changeup and got it done with his fastball and breaking pitches.

“You’ll have those days in spring and throughout the season,” deGrom told reporters. “So, you have to find other ways to get outs. My slider was good today and I mixed in a few curveballs.

“I’m happy with how things are going. The main thing is to stay healthy. I’m just happy that I feel good and I’m looking forward to starting the season.”

Health does not only include elbows and shoulders. It includes illness, which brings us to Noah Syndergaard, who has been struggling with bronchitis the past month and a half. Six weeks is a long time to fighting illness and this isn’t just a cold or the sniffles.

“He’s like many people, including myself, that when it gets in their lungs and they get bronchitis, it can affect you for a while,” manager Terry Collins said. “He’s fighting that. He’s been on medication. He is getting better, but he just ran out of gas.”

Syndergaard threw in the high 90s Monday, but later said he felt tired and his delivery was out of whack. He admitted it could have been because of being ill.

So, Syndergaard said being ill could have sapped his strength and Collins admitted the same. So, why don’t Collins and GM Sandy Alderson do the smart thing and sit Syndergaard for his next start if he’s still feeling lousy?

Now, Syndergaard, like any other Mets’ pitcher will fight Collins if he wants to rest him. Matt Harvey already has … several times.

But, Collins and Alderson are supposed to be the adults in the room and should be smart enough to tell their kids not to go outside and play when they are sick. And, enforce it.

If spring training is all about getting ready for the season, then shouldn’t that include not letting Syndergaard getting run down?

Mar 09

DeGrom Continues To Be Sharp

The early returns have been good for Jacob deGrom, who threw four shutout innings in today’s 5-5 tie with Detroit.

Coming off surgery on his elbow, deGrom has thrown six scoreless and walk-free innings in his two spring training starts. He’s clocked in the mid-90s and struck out seven.

DEGROM: Has reason to smile. (AP)

DEGROM: Has reason to smile. (AP)

Results aren’t important, at least not yet, this early in spring training. What’s most important at this stage, especially after surgery, is fastball command and deGrom has been sharp.

“I was really pleased with being able to locate all four pitches today,” deGrom told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “I think today I was able to throw that changeup where I wanted, pretty much when I wanted to.”

Of the Mets’ rotation, deGrom has been the sharpest, followed by Noah Syndergaard – but his pitch count has been high – and Steven Matz. Matt Harvey has been roughed up and Zack Wheeler starts for the first time Friday.

While deGrom has been solid in his six innings, the early returns have been mixed overall. It’s premature to say the rotation is completely healthy and ready to go, but there’s reason to be optimistic.

 

Mar 07

D’Arnaud’s Start Good Sign

One of the Mets’ spring training concerns is off to a good start. You wouldn’t be wrong saying Travis d’Arnaud is facing a make-or-break season.

The combination of not performing – at the plate or behind it – and not being able to stay on the field has kept d’Arnaud from being the impact player they envision when they acquired him from Toronto in the R.A. Dickey trade. Believe it or not, there were some who rated d’Arnaud higher than Noah Syndergaard in that deal.

D'ARNAUD: Good start. (AP)

D’ARNAUD: Good start. (AP)

It’s been only 20 at-bats, but d’Arnaud is hitting .450 (9-for-20) with two homers and four RBI. His discipline is better, evidenced by a .450 on-base percentage.

It’s rather simple, d’Arnaud explained to reporters: After working with hitting coach Kevin Long this winter, d’Arnaud ditched his former stance in which he wrapped his bat around his head, he’s seeing the ball better.

Translation: Seeing the ball enables him to hit it.

“My results are more swinging at strikes and hitting the ball on the barrel,” d’Arnaud said. “For me, me it’s being able to see the ball longer and not have to cheat to get to some pitches and just keeping everything slow and not try to do too much.

“We made the swing so it’s more direct and I don’t have to overcommit.”

Even a fraction of a second would give d’Arnaud enough time to recognize and turn on a pitch. It’s the difference between driving a pitch and popping it up or missing it entirely.

For d’Arnaud, it could be the difference between a productive year in the major leagues, or not being there at all.

Mar 05

Two Out Of Three Not Bad For Mets’ Starters

Just as the Mets can’t make a big deal out of the two strong innings from Noah Syndergaard and Jacob deGrom in their spring training debuts, they can’t panic over Matt Harvey getting ripped Sunday by the Cardinals in his first spring outing.

Syndergaard and deGrom were solid Friday and Saturday respectfully, but Harvey gave up four runs in 1.2 innings – with three strikeouts and a homer given up – in his first start since undergoing thoracic outlet syndrome surgery.

“Obviously, it’s been eight months since I’ve faced another team,” Harvey told reporters. “The biggest thing was going out there and trying to, I guess, get my mechanics back against another team and hitters. You can go out there and do all of that with your own guys and catchers, but you can’t get to where you want to be unless you’re facing hitters. …

“Overall, I’m happy with some of the pitches I made. I’m happy with the way I felt, the way the ball was coming out.”

Both Syndergaard and deGrom threw in the upper 90s in their first starts, but Harvey was in the lower 90s, something that doesn’t overly concern manager Terry Collins.

“I think Matt knows that it’s going to take some time in spring training to get him where he wants to be when he starts the season,” said Collins.

As for deGrom, he’s coming off elbow surgery. He struck out three in two perfect innings Saturday against Houston.

“It’s a step in the right direction,” deGrom told reporters. “It’s one thing to say you feel good in spring training, but then to go out and actually throw, it definitely feels good to get back out there. I feel like the ball is coming out of my hand a lot better. That goes back to mechanics.”

Mar 03

Syndergaard Impressive In Spring Debut

Another day, another 11 runs, but unquestionably today’s storyline was all about Noah Syndergaard’s first start of the spring. You don’t want to make too much of the first start of the spring, but the first impression of Syndergaard was a good one.

SYNDERGAARD: Focused. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Focused. (AP)

Syndergaard threw 20 of 29 pitches in two innings for strikes and consistently clocked in the high 90s. We all know Syndergaard throws hard, but his key pitch in today’s 11-3 mauling of Houston was a change-up that has the velocity of many pitchers’ normal fastball.

“It has the potential to be my best swing-and-miss pitch,” Syndergaard told reporters. “|It’s got a lot more deception to it. … I love throwing it. There’s nothing better to see than throwing a real wicked change-up and getting a hitter to ‘Tasmanian Devil’ into the batter’s box. It’s a good feeling.”

It probably wasn’t a bad feeling either that he was signed to an extension of $605,500 after the game.

There are a lot of things to love about Syndergaard, but what I really like about him is how he’s doing everything to make himself better. He’s a workout fiend and eschewed the World Baseball Classic to concentrate on getting ready for the season.

“I am a Met,” boasted Syndergaard. “Nobody makes it to the Hall of Fame or won a World Series playing in the WBC.”

Damn, how can you not love that?