Mar 01

Mets Wrap: Good News On Lannan, Parnell; Duda Homers

On the bright side for the New York Mets, Lucas Duda homered and has hit the ball hard in the first two exhibition games.

He didn’t pitch in the game, but closer Bobby Parnell threw batting practice, and said, “I’ll be good to go,’’ when asked about being ready for Opening Day.

Also, fifth-starter candidate John Lannan threw two scoreless innings in his first game action since undergoing surgery to repair a tendon linking the thigh muscles to his left knee.

“I was just grateful to be back out there and feel pretty good,’’ Lannan said.

Other than that, there wasn’t much positive Saturday for the Mets, who lost 9-1 to the Marlins, including Kyle Farnsworth, 37, who gave up a homer and whose fastball was 88 mph.

But, it is early.

Feb 27

Mets Wrap: Niese MRI Negative; Syndergaard Stars

The New York Mets, a team starving for good news, received some Thursday when left-hander Jon Niese’s MRI on his left shoulder came back negative.

Niese is expected to resume throwing this weekend, but his exhibition start scheduled for Tuesday will be pushed back.

Above all else, Niese received a scare that should tell the Mets starting pitching is fragile and they should be careful before they consider dealing what they have.

In addition:

Noah Syndergaard struck out five in two innings of an intrasquad game. He’s scheduled to make his first exhibition start Monday against Atlanta.

Eric Young, who has a strained side muscle, could be held out this weekend.

Bartolo Colon could throw Friday. Colon has a strained calf muscle and spent the day working out on a stationary bike.

* General manager Sandy Alderson said 90 victories is possible, reported The New York Daily News.

 

Feb 27

Syndergaard Stars In Intrasquad Game; Mets Shouldn’t Get Carried Away

The cheers were great, the performance was scintillating, but the New York Mets – and their often-frustrated fan base – shouldn’t get carried away and read too much into Noah Syndergaard’s performance in Thursday’s intrasquad game.

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

In Syndergaard’s first performance in the Mets’ camp, Syndergaard, throwing what manager Terry Collins calls “the hook from hell,’’ struck out five in two innings. He also gave up a run on four hits, but with no walks.

Not only was Syndergaard’s curveball working in fall-off-the-table fashion, but his 97 mph., fastball was sizzling.

“I felt pretty good out there. I kind of shocked myself a little bit,’’ Syndergaard told reporters Thursday in Port St. Lucie. “I wasn’t expecting that my first time out there.’’

Nor should the Mets expect that from him in Monday’s start against Atlanta; every time out at Triple-A Las Vegas; or when he finally is brought up in June. He’ll need time to develop into all what is expected of him.

“I didn’t think I was going to get the start, first of all,” Syndergaard said of Monday. “I’m excited, a little nervous at the same time. It’s the first time facing a real big-league lineup. I’m going to go out there and do what I can. It’s still a game. They’re still playing baseball out there.’’

Which is true, but baseball is also a game of emotions. Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler, despite their youth, have been able to keep their emotions in check. The Mets would like to see the same from Syndergaard.

That will be easier, of course, if he’s throwing that fastball in the upper 90s.

“How can you not like what you saw?’’ Collins said. “For heaven’s sake, I don’t know how hard he threw, but it was firm. Even in a game like this, you better get to the heater, because you don’t want to try to hit that curveball.

“Certainly everything you heard, you saw. You heard, ‘What a great arm.’ You got it. You heard, ‘He’s got a great presence,’ that he pounds the strike zone. He did that.’’

Of course, should Syndergaard cut down the Braves as he did his minor league teammates, there will be rumblings about cracking the rotation.

However, Collins and general manager Sandy Alderson should a turn a deaf ear and continue with the same plan they had last season for Wheeler.

ON DECK: Mets Wrap.

Feb 26

Bartolo Colon, Eric Young Held Out Of Practice With Tightness

On the day Jonathon Niese was sent to New York for a MRI on his sore left shoulder, the New York Mets had two other injuries Wednesday afternoon, but neither appear to be serious.

Bartolo Colon, scheduled to pitch in Thursday’s intrasquad game has tightness in his calf and spent much of the day riding the stationary bike to get loose.

Earlier in the day, it was revealed Colon was in line to be the No. 2 starter in the rotation. That has not changed. Undoubtedly, Colon will not pitch tomorrow and his first exhibition start has not been announced.

Also, outfielder Eric Young was held out of workouts with tightness in his side. Manager Terry Collins said he expects Young to play this weekend.

 

Feb 26

Jon Niese To Get MRI On Shoulder

Let’s face it, it wouldn’t be a normal New York Mets spring training without an injury – specifically to a pitcher.

Jonathon Niese is the latest and was sent to New York today for a MRI after complaining of pain in his left shoulder.

NIESE: Has MRI. (AP)

NIESE: Has MRI. (AP)

“I wanted to keep it quiet,’’ Niese told reporters in Port St. Lucie, ironically just two days after manager Terry Collins said he wants his players to disclose injuries. “It’s just a precautionary thing to make sure it’s not worse from last year. I just want peace of mind.’’

Specifically, Niese said his arm felt “dead,’’ which is a common occurrence during spring training and often stems from throwing too much too early.

Niese was in Port St. Lucie earlier than required to be, and there’s no telling how much he threw then, or during the off-season.

Niese, after laboring through two starts in freezing weather in Minnesota and Colorado last season – both games should have been rescheduled – later complained of stiffness in his back and trouble getting loose.

Eventually, Niese was placed on the disabled list, June 21, with a partial tear in his rotator cuff, and did not come back until Aug. 11.

Collins, speaking to reporters in Port St. Lucie, said the pain is in the triceps, which is a different part of the arm. The pain surfaced while Niese was throwing his second round of 20 pitches of batting practice Tuesday.

“Batting practice started and he felt fine,’’ Collins said. “And then he threw his second 20 pitches the other day. He just said at the end of it, ‘Geez, my arm’s just dead. Like, it’s dead.’ … It’s a precaution right now, but any time you’re sending someone for an MRI, obviously there’s going to be a concern until you get the reading back.

“He just said he’s got a little discomfort in there. So we’re going to go have it looked at.’’

Niese, 27, in the midst of a five-year, $25.5 million contract, has been scheduled to be the Opening Day starter, March 31, against Washington, at Citi Field.

ON DECK:  Sandy Alderson on shortstop situation