Oct 22

Breaking News: Mets To Name Callaway As Manager

Multiple reports are saying the Mets have named Mickey Callaway, the pitching coach of the Indians since 2013 as their new manager, beating out a huge pool of candidates.

Kevin Long, Manny Acta, Bob Geren, Robin Ventura, Joe McEwing and Alex Cora were reportedly among those GM Sandy Alderson was considering.

Callaway will replace Terry Collins, who was forced out and took a position in the team’s front office after a disastrous, injury-filled 70-92 record this season.

Like everybody else considered, Callaway represents a gamble as it remains to be seen whether Alderson reached out and got the Mets a nugget or whether he was seduced by a hot “flavor of the month.”

Callaway, 42, built the Indians’ pitching staff into one of the best as they led the majors in ERA (3.30) and strikeouts (1,614), shutouts (19), complete games (7) and finished third with an opponents’ batting average of just .236. But, don’t forget, he’s not bringing Corey Kluber, Trevor Bauer or Carlos Carrasco with him.

Among Callaway’s first priorities is getting, and keeping, the Mets’ young pitchers healthy as the Mets’ season imploded with injuries to Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler.

 

 

 

Oct 13

Why Won’t Alderson Consider Gardenhire?

Reportedly, Ron Gardenhire is one of three finalists for the recently-vacant Boston managerial position, the obvious question must be posed: Where is he on the Mets’ radar?

Of the ten or so mostly non-descript names mentioned to replace Terry Collins – whom the Boston media also lists as a candidate – Gardenhire is clearly the most experienced and qualified possibility.

GARDENHIRE: Should be the one. (AP)

GARDENHIRE: Should be the one. (AP)

Gardenhire, a former Mets infielder, led the Minnesota Twins to six division titles, and five times won at least 90 games. His kryptonite was the Yankees.

I find it incredulous Gardenhire’s name has not been linked to the Mets, despite GM Sandy Alderson stating leadership was the prime factor he valued in a manager.

The Mets knew months ago they were moving on from Collins, and yet they aren’t any closer to hiring a manager than they were when they announced he wasn’t coming back. John Farrell was fired as Red Sox manager Wednesday, yet not two days later The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported Gardenhire was a finalist.

Gardenhire is a fundamentalist, and his teams always played the game the right way, played hard and rarely beat themselves. He has been described as old-school, yet a teacher who can relate to young players. He is respected by players and opposing managers and executives.

So, why won’t Alderson give him the time of day? Is it because he’s old-school? Is it the money? Is it a losing record in the playoffs? Is Alderson afraid of a high-profile manager? Doesn’t Alderson want to win?

If Alderson is truly committed to returning the Mets to contending status, he is doing ownership, his players and New York fans a disservice by not putting a call into Gardenhire.

I’m sure he can get the number.

Oct 02

How About Collins Overseeing Mets’ Minor League System?

GM Sandy Alderson said Terry Collins is best suited to work in player development. If that is the case, and Alderson is telling the truth that he believes Collins has a lot to offer and he wants to continue working with him, then there is one role for him, and that is to oversee the minor league system with the goal of implementing a “Mets Way.’’

Both Alderson and Collins suggested a need for such a program in recent weeks. Collins did in a roundabout way several weeks ago when commenting about Amed Rosario’s habit of tapping his glove with the ball before throwing to first. That habit cost the Mets a game and Collins wondered why it wasn’t addressed in Las Vegas.

Alderson more conceded the need for such an instructor when he noted several of the Mets’ rookies came to New York with a multitude of bad habits.

Rosario’s habit and Dominic Smith’s brain cramps are just two of the most prevalent. There are others, beginning with pitchers’ inability to throw strikes, and including hitters’ plate discipline, atrocious base running and defensive fundamentals, such as hitting the cutoff man.

Situational hitting and improving on-base percentage also must be improved.

The idea is to teach, beginning with the rookie leagues the same things are expected from the major leaguers.

That way there are no surprises.

However, for this to work Alderson must first implement organizational philosophies on offense and pitching. The pitchers have to be taught to throw inside, the way Rafael Montero was when he was on his hot streak.

Too many of the Mets’ hitters are preoccupied with hitting home runs. Sure, home runs are great, but consider this, the Mets tied Milwaukee for the NL lead with 224 homers, but neither are in the playoffs.

Aug 28

More Bad Injury News; Wright Rehab Derailed

They wouldn’t be the Mets if they didn’t have another day of bad injury news. What had been a glimmer of hope in this painful season turned south today with David Wright’s announcement his comeback was over.

WRIGHT: Staring into dark future. (AP)

WRIGHT: Staring into dark future. (AP)

“After playing in a few games, I continued to have shoulder pain,” Wright said in a statement released by the team. “So, I decided to go to the doctor and get it checked out. Will make any decisions going forward after my appointment.”

Wright, 34, last played in May of 2016. Wright will be re-examined in New York later this week, after which the next step in his long and arduous comeback from spinal stenosis. I can’t imagine Wright retiring now, but instead think he’ll spend the off-season getting stronger and trying to give it one more chance next spring.

While Wright’s comeback has hit the skids, we don’t know for sure how Michael Conforto’s recovery from a tear in his posterior capsule that will likely require surgery with a recovery time of six to 12 months.

Conforto’s injury will impact the Mets approach this offseason. Because they can’t count on Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes for next season, the Mets will be in the market for an outfield bat – Jay Bruce II, perhaps?

Aug 14

A Good Game, But Still Interleague Play

It was well played, but tonight’s Mets-Yankees game was still interleague, so it only gets a half-hearted thumbs-up. I make no apologies, I can’t stand interleague play.

If it is a true rivalry game, then I’d rather see the Mets play the Nationals, the Braves, or even the Phillies. Then again, it would be nice to see a dozen more games in Citizens Bank Park.

Hell, I’d rather see them play another four games with the Dodgers than four with the Yankees this week.

There are so many reasons why interleague play doesn’t make it for me:

No integrity to schedule: Interleague play coupled with the unbalanced schedule means teams in the same league don’t travel the same course to the playoffs. That’s not an issue when everybody plays the same schedule, home and away.

I’m sorry, but 19 games a year against the Nationals, Braves, Phillies and Marlins is just too damn much.

Speaking of the schedule, does it make sense for the Angels to play three games at Citi Field while the Yankees are only in for two? Or the Mets in Seattle for three games, but only two games in the Bronx?

There are so many complications with the current schedule, such as teams playing out of their leagues and divisions in April, when the schedule is prone to rainouts. That the Yankees had to wait out a three-hour-plus rain delay because the Tigers made only one trip to New York is simply the epitome of arrogance and taking their fans for granted.

Commissioner Rob Manfred, like Bud Selig before him, is so hell bent on cutting three minutes from the time of game – and selling T-shirts in China and Europe, that he ignores the basic structure that served the sport well for over a century.

Regarding the Mets and Yankees, the two teams are competing for different objectives, so what’s the point of these games? It has been said a baseball season is a marathon, but with different schedules how fair is it for one team to run 26 miles while another runs only 25?

Attendance and original premise are irrelevant: There are only four teams playing in antiquated stadiums – Boston, the Cubs, Tampa Bay and Oakland – with the Athletics and Rays hurting at the gate.

Interleague play was introduced as a gimmick to boost attendance, with some critics of Selig saying it was to have the Cubs play in Milwaukee. But, with nearly everybody playing in new stadiums, attendance is rarely an issue.

Another selling point for tearing the fabric of the game was for the fan in Cleveland to watch the Padres. But, with cable TV and the various MLB packages, viewers in Wyoming can see most any team at most any time.

Different rules: Can you imagine an AFC team getting to use a two-point conversion with NFC teams not being able to? There’s simply no good reason why the NL doesn’t have the DH while the AL teams do. It is ridiculous this still goes on, especially in the World Series.

It doesn’t work everywhere: I can appreciate the premise in New York, Chicago and maybe Los Angeles. Weak arguments can be made for Cleveland-Cincinnati, Baltimore-Washington, St. Louis-Kansas City and San Francisco-Oakland. But, who are the “natural interleague rivals’’ for Atlanta, Boston, Seattle, Arizona, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and San Diego? Or, Minnesota and Detroit?

Unless a player is returning to face his former team – or the teams in question are having outstanding seasons, what’s the appeal of Twins-Pirates, or Mets-Mariners, or Marlins-Tigers?

I’m old school: Call me what you will, but I grew up watching baseball a certain way. I respect and appreciate, but I have yet to hear an argument interleague play is for the betterment of the game.

The 2000 World Series was special, it was an event. but everything since just didn’t do it for me. I mean other than Shawn Estes throwing behind Roger Clemens. Yeah, that was interesting.

MONTERO SHARP: Rafael Montero was as good tonight as we’ve ever seen him, giving up two runs in six innings, which by every stretch was a quality start.

Montero gave up five hits and two walks with six strikeouts, so he was adept at pitching out of trouble. What was most impressive about him was how he challenged Yankee hitters inside with his fastball, including Aaron Judge, whom he struck out in the first.

Judge did get a measure of revenge with a game-tying homer in the sixth.