Dec 30

Pirates Acquire 1B Chris McGuiness

DAVIS: Nothing moving.

The Mets have unsuccessfully tried to get pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez from Orioles for Ike Davis, but are still talking to the Brewers, Orioles and Pirates, reported Mike Puma of the New York Post before the weekend.

However, scratch the Pirates off that list. The Bucs announced that have acquired first baseman Chris McGuiness from the Texas Rangers for righthander Miles Mikolas.

McGuiness, 25, batted .246 with 11 home runs and 43 RBI in 104 Triple-A games last season, and it looks like he’ll likely be the left-handed bat they were looking for to platoon with Gaby Sanchez.

Sandy Alderson continues to seek a top pitching prospect for Davis and is bent on holding out for one even if it means keeping him. My guess is that if Davis becomes the power hitter he’s been projected to be for another team, Alderson wants to make sure he gets a top arm out of it.

Seeing Davis become a 35+ home run hitter elsewhere would definitely sting. But will a team deal a top prospect on a hunch that Ike could be that guy? That’s the dilemma.

About two weeks ago it was reported that the Mets were seeking O’s top pitching prospect Dylan Bundy for Davis. On Friday, the Baltimore Sun reported that the Orioles would need to be “blown away” to deal Eduardo Rodriguez.

The Ike Davis rumors first caught fire at the GM Meetings and then again at the Winter Meetings when Sandy Alderson had several conversations with Brewers GM Doug Melvin in a trade for their young pitching prospect, Tyler Thornburg. However, those discussions fizzled out when the Brewers balked at the suggestion.

During the Mets Holiday Party, Alderson did confirm that he was still talking with a number of teams, but said “I can’t say anything will happen.”

Dec 29

Similarities Between Mets And Jets

The New York Mets and Jets entered their respective seasons wearing the dysfunctional label, and ended them with other similarities, including the decisions to keep their on-field leaders.

The Jets’ choice to keep the embattled Rex Ryan mirrored that of the Mets to keep Terry Collins. Both took terrible, underachieving teams and exceeded expectations. For awhile this summer, .500 was not out of the question until Matt Harvey’s season-ending elbow injury.

For most of their season, the Jets, pegged by many to not win more than four or five games, finished at .500 with today’s victory at Miami, and it wasn’t until recently their playoff aspirations were snuffed out.

The primary reasons for keeping Collins was because the Mets made greater than expected improvement despite numerous personnel deficiencies and because the team continually played hard for him.

The Mets’ most significant personnel weakness is offense, which is also the Jets’ Achilles Heel.

Going with a rookie quarterback, a weak offensive line, and nothing significant in the backfield or at receiver, the Jets did just enough to win half their games.

In the end, the Mets decided the team improved to the point where it didn’t want to endure another rebuilding program.

Realistically, the Jets – especially defensively – played hard for Ryan, who coached with lame-duck status a new quarterback, under a new defensive coordinator and new general manager.

The Jets could have packed it in, but despite being undermanned offensively, played with integrity to give the team something to build on.

Just like with the Mets.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 27

Have Been On The DL With Back Surgery; Back Now And Wishing You The Best

First of all, not much has happened with your New York Mets the past week, which alleviates some my angst.

The blog has been dormant the past week, for which I apologize. I entered the hospital just before Christmas to have back surgery. Unfortunately, the recovery time took longer than anticipated and today was the first time I’ve been able to sit up to a desk to write.

I’d like to thank Joe DeCaro for during my surgery, but he had holiday plans too and wasn’t available for the past five days. His help is always appreciated.

You know I hate leaving the blog unattended, but it couldn’t be helped. For that, I am sorry and want to tell you I’ll keep working on giving you the best commentary and analysis I can provide.

So again, dear readers, thanks for you support in the past and please accept my apologies, and, of course, wishing the happiest of holidays.

Thanks, JD.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 17

Meet Zack Wheeler And Daniel Murphy At Mets’ Annual Coat Drive

Zack Wheeler and Daniel Murphy will be at Citi Field Wednesday, 11-11:30 a.m., for the New York Mets’ seventh annual Holiday Coat Drive.

The players will greet fans at the Mets Team Store who are dropping off winter coats.

Fans who donate one or more coats will receive a pair of tickets to a select game in April, plus a coupon for 15 percent off regularly priced merchandise only tomorrow.

The Mets Team Store is located adjacent to the Jackie Robinson Rotunda. Fans are instructed to park in Lot G.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 15

Collins Is Hopeful That Wheeler Will Toss 200 Innings

WHEELER: High hopes for him.

WHEELER: High hopes for him.

As of now, the New York Mets don’t anticipate an innings limitations on Zack Wheeler, who was shut down for his last two starts in 2013. Wheeler threw 100 innings last year and said an innings limit hasn’t been determined, and if one is later on, it won’t be until after the season starts.

“We haven’t talked about [an innings limit],’’ manager Terry Collins said. “He should get over 200 if he goes out there 30?something times.  If he does that, he would have a heck of a year. When you’re getting those kinds of innings, you’re keeping your team in games.’’

Hopefully, that thinking won’t change and the Mets will not put the shackles on Wheeler, who won’t learn how to pitch on this level unless he does so.

Pitchers today wear down when they don’t accumulate innings. If a pitcher doesn’t build up his arm, he won’t have anything in the tank when he needs it. There are times when a pitcher has to learn to pitch in the eighth and ninth innings, when he’s running on fumes, when he just has to reach down.

Wheeler had his rough moments last summer, such as when he went away from his fastball and told to work in more on his secondary pitches. When that approach was adjusted to where he could work more off his fastball, Wheeler pitched well.

Collins said he believes Wheeler’s demeanor and emotional make-up could allow him to make a jump similar to what Matt Harvey made last season before he injured. Collins said Harvey learned how to make adjustments within a game and thinks Wheeler can do likewise.

“I’m hoping he takes the Matt Harvey step,’’  Collins said. “[Wheeler] now realizes he can fix it.  He realized all he had to do was make things.  He didn’t have to overthrow.

“He’s still got that great arm if he needs it.  His command of his secondary pitches got better.  I think his confidence rose as the season went along.  Again, I think the sky is the limit for what potential this guy has.’’

Wheeler told ESPN Radio he plans on reporting to spring training around Feb. 5, which is ten days before the official reporting date for pitchers and catchers.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos