Feb 25

Mets Still Unsettled At Shortstop; Not Thrilled With Ruben Tejada

It’s not hard to figure out the New York Mets aren’t thrilled with the prospect of entering the season with Ruben Tejada as their shortstop. Despite off-season assertions from GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins they would be happy with Tejada, there are events to the contrary.

TEJADA: Still under fire.

TEJADA: Still under fire.

Despite praise for Tejada’s participation in an off-season fitness camp in Michigan, there have been reports he’s not exactly buff. This can’t please Collins, who has already called out Tejada on his work ethic.

Perhaps, the most damning stories have been the reports from outside camp, beginning with the incessant drum beating to sign Stephen Drew coupled with Alderson’s reluctance to draw the line on the subject.

Either the Mets want Drew or they don’t. “Most unlikely [we will sign him],’’ as Alderson says, leaves open the door. That’s definitely not good news for Tejada and leaves the impression the Mets don’t know what they are doing.

For those scoring at home, Alderson entered the off-season with upgrading shortstop and first base as priorities and did neither. Funny, in the first week of full-squad workouts both are in the spotlight for the wrong reasons.

Next are reports the Mets are interested in Seattle’s Nick Franklin, which tells us Drew’s asking price remains high, and it goes beyond the compensatory draft pick as an obstacle.

Just as they were with Ike Davis, the Mets’ ambivalence in addressing possible Tejada replacements indicate there’s little desire to keep him if there’s an affordable alternative.

As for Drew, his agent Scott Boras, has him working out in a facility he set up outside of Miami. The sticking point is the compensatory draft pick and there have been reports Drew could stay out until after the June amateur draft when that condition is removed.

Hopefully, the Mets will have a shortstop they are happy with by then.

ON DECK:  Have to like what Buck Showalter did.

 

Feb 24

Wrapping The Day: Collins Talks Injuries; Syndergaard Throws; Trade Discussions With Mariners

Several hours after Ike Davis admonished a reporter for a story saying the first baseman concealed an oblique injury for much of last season, New York Mets manager Terry Collins did the same – to the player through the press.

Collins had to be embarrassed when he found out through the media Davis hid the injury using the logic he didn’t want to come off as an excuse maker just as he was about to be optioned to Triple-A Las Vegas.

“There’s got to be a conversation,’’ Collins told reporters Monday in Port St. Lucie. “And then certainly it’s up to me to decide which way to proceed.’’

In addition:

* ESPN reported the Mets are talking with Seattle regarding shortstop Nick Franklin.

* Prospect Noah Syndergaard threw two simulated 20-pitch innings of batting practice. Syndergaard is scheduled to pitch in an intrasquad game Thursday and face the Braves in an exhibition game next Monday.

* Among the pitchers scheduled to work in Thursday’s intrasquad game are Dillon Gee, Bartolo Colon, Daisuke Matsuzaka, Joel Carreno, Jeurys Familia, Carlos Torres, Jose Valverde and Steve Matz.

* After conferring with outfielder Curtis Granderson, Collins amended his stance on playing time and said he’ll give him a lot of at-bats. Granderson said he wanted to see more pitching because of the time he missed last season.

 

Feb 24

No Guarantee Mets Would Have Gotten Nelson Cruz For Bargain Price

It is an oversimplification to suggest the New York Mets could have signed Nelson Cruz for the same $8 million the Orioles did, if not a little more. Especially when juxtaposed against the Chris Young signing for $7.25 million.

I was against the Young signing, but that had nothing to do with Cruz, whom I would have balked against because of his connection to PEDs and defensive liabilities.

The Mets signed Young prior to the Winter Meetings when the market was fresh. Cruz was signed after spring training had begun.

Don’t forget at the time the Mets were apprehensive about giving up a compensatory draft pick. They didn’t have to surrender a pick for Young.

The market has dwindled dramatically since they signed Young. GM Sandy Alderson, who initially suggested he might let things play out in the market, had no way of knowing Cruz would sign for what he did, especially when the early reports had him asking for $75 million over five years.

Signing a power-hitting outfielder was a primary need and Alderson rolled the dice with Young. His odds were more in his favor later with Curtis Granderson.

But, for Cruz, who would have guessed this?

Maybe had the Mets re-visited Cruz with a low-ball offer, he could have signed with them, but the feeling is it wouldn’t have been a good fit because of the PED issue.

And, had they inked both Young and Cruz to one-year deals, the odds are good they would have needed to shop again for outfielders next winter.

As for Cruz, this is the best thing that could happen to him because it affords him an opportunity to put up monster numbers in bandbox Camden Yards and try free agency against next year.

ON DECK: Collins wants players to reveal injuries.

Feb 22

Harvey Feels “Awesome” After Throwing

For New York Mets pitcher Matt Harvey, the long and grueling rehab road on the anniversary of his Tommy John surgery took another step when he began his throwing program.

Officially, it was 20 throws on flat ground from 60 feet away to bullpen catcher Dave Racaniello.

HARVEY: Begins throwing program

HARVEY: Begins throwing program (Adam Rubin, ESPN)

Harvey underwent surgery, Oct. 22, after giving up on his plan of trying to treat the injury with rest in an attempt to be ready this season.

Harvey described the procedure to reporters Saturday as using a tendon from his right wrist and wrapping it around his elbow three times.

“It was awesome,’’ Harvey told reporters. “I know it was 20 throws at 60 feet, but everything felt absolutely amazing. I’ve got a lot of work to do. It’s going to be a tough process [even] with how things felt today. But I’ve got to stick with it and move forward.’’

The plan for Harvey, who went 9-5 (but with over 10 no-decisions last summer), is to throw three times a week (Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays) for now.

Each non-throw day is also important because it allows the trainers to see how the elbow responds to the throwing.

Harvey’s reputation is that of trying to push the envelope, which he acknowledged he must resist.

“There’s a little guy in the back of my head saying, ‘Don’t go too strong.’ He’s usually the one who’s right,’’ Harvey said. “Obviously feeling good and as competitive as I am, I always wanted to push more. But ‘Jiminy Cricket’ was telling me, ‘no’ in the back of my head.’’

Harvey said he’s like to pitch this year, but added that sentiment was the competitor in him surfacing. Harvey did acknowledge he agreed with general manager Sandy Alderson’s assertion he not be a focus this year.

Harvey conceded this was simply the first day in a long process.

 

 

Feb 22

Rolling Stones And Mets The Same Age

I am an avid Rolling Stones fan. Have all their albums, know most of their songs by heart and saw them numerous times in concert, including twice at Shea Stadium in 1989.

Mets and Stones the same age.

Mets and Stones the same age.

It was a tremendous show, with 50,000-plus fans singing “Ruby Tuesday,’’ in unison, and I mean every word, not just the refrain.

I noticed they are trending Saturday on Yahoo.

Why?

Because they performed the other day in the Middle East – Abu Dhabi, to be exact in front of 30,000 fans. It was kind of surprising news considering the political climate of the area and the Stones’ reputation.

One article said they were formed in 1962, which rang a significant bell because that was the year the New York Mets were born. That means the Stones and Mets are the same age.

Amazing.

The Mets won’t be able to get Mick and Keith this summer at Citi Field, but that isn’t to say they might not be able to snag a Rolling Stones tribute band.

It might bring about an afternoon of satisfaction.