Jul 10

Matt Harvey Misses The Point … Again

Trust me, I don’t hate the Mets’ Matt Harvey. It’s just he does and say things making it hard to like him or give him the benefit of doubt at times.

On the Mets’ West Coast trip, Harvey rented a private jet to go to the Post Ranch Inn resort located in Big Sur, Calif. To break away from the team on a road trip, Harvey needed permission from Terry Collins, the manager he undercut last Saturday when he moaned about the six-man rotation.

While on the jet, Harvey posted a photo of him to Instagram. It’s his money, and he can do with it what he wants. However, instead of staying with the team and trying to come up with a solution on what to do with that extra day, Harvey thought it would be a good idea to go big time as, “superstars’’ sometimes like to do.

Only, Harvey is no superstar. Harvey seemingly forgets he has a lifetime 19-16 record, which isn’t exactly superstar stuff. He is, 19-16 lifetime, so spare me the indignation of your comments telling me Harvey is the Mets’ future. We don’t really know that, but we can guess he’ll bolt the Mets when he becomes a free agent.

Does anybody really believe Harvey won’t listen to a pitch from the Yankees.

When you go on social media to boast living the high life when you’re only 7-6 this year, you take the risk of getting roasted, which is what happened.

Not getting it, the thin-skinned Harvey took to Instagram again to post another photo of himself landing in New York on the Mets’ charter, with this message: “Just landed back in NYC on `THE TEAM FLIGHT’ WITH THE TEAM.’’

Harvey, don’t forget, had a photo of himself coming out of Tommy John surgery flipping the bird to his critics. Then, to emphasize his disdain for his critics – which are growing – by having a snow globe of an extended middle finger in his locker. Total class. Can you in your wildest dreams ever think Tom Seaver would have done anything remotely arrogant?

No, I don’t hate Harvey, but right now he’s awfully difficult to like. It’s not my responsibility to be Harvey’s cheerleader. There are enough of you out there who swallow his arrogance to do that. My responsibility to you is to call it as I see it and this is what I see.

If don’t agree, I can live with that.

May 21

Is Panic In The Mets’ DNA?

Sometimes, Mets manager Terry Collins sounds like a man who is trying to convince himself of something he’s not sure of, when he said, or vowed, his team would not panic.

As somebody who has been in on hundreds of such press briefings, I know why the topic of panic was raised. Believe me, it’s not because it’s New York and the media is prying. The question would be the same in Pittsburgh or Cleveland or even laid back San Diego. When you lose seven of ten games and nine games in the standings to your main division rival, nerves get frayed, no matter how loudly or vociferously, Collins denies it.

COLLINS: Looks concerned and should be. (AP)

COLLINS: Looks concerned and should be. (AP)

“There’s a lot – a lot – of baseball left,’’ Collins said last night. “There’s no sense of urgency here. We have things we have to continue to try to do. We have to continue to try to watch the workload of some guys. We need to continue to try to get healthy. But there’s no panic here, believe me. Not in the clubhouse. Not anyplace else.”

This is what Collins believes and I don’t doubt he thinks that way. He would be a fool to admit otherwise. That’s why I don’t get why some in my profession would even pose the question. They already know the answer.

I raised the issue yesterday the Mets are at a critical point to their season, and I did so because I’ve seen them fold before. Do you remember September of 2007 when they lost a seven-game lead to the Phillies with 17 games remaining?

Of course you do.

It has been in the Mets’ DNA to go into long, dry spells. That’s where they are now. Who knows what goes on behind closed doors. Reporters ask questions to find out.

The Mets’ primary issue now is a stagnant offense that has scored three or fewer runs in 16 of their past 22 games. Not surprisingly, they are 10-15 since their 11-game winning streak.

GM Sandy Alderson already said not to expect help from the outside, that the plan is to wait for David Wright and Travis d’Arnaud to return from the disabled list. There are other options, such as juggling the lineup, but that smacks of panic unless the move is justifiable, which it would be when Wright and d’Arnaud to come back.

The Mets don’t have a good bench, so benching somebody isn’t a great option. Plus, the guy they always look to sit is Wilmer Flores, who is their best home run hitter. Just who in their minor league system is an answer?

The Mets’ best option, as distasteful as this sounds because that’s been Alderson’s mantra, is to wait this out. Slumps happen in a 162-game schedule and that’s what’s going on with the Mets.

Getting out of a slump takes time, and I don’t know how patient the Mets will be. Unfortunately, neither does Collins.

However, when the story of this season is written, this period will be the watershed moment.


Apr 13

Today In Mets History: NL Baseball Returns To New York

On this date in 1962, National League baseball returned to New York after a four-year absence in a 4-3 loss to Pittsburgh in their home opener in the Polo Grounds.

Surprisingly, only 12,447 showed up for the first National League game in the city since the Dodgers and Giants bolted for California for the start of the 1958 season.

Pitcher Sherman Jones took the loss for the Mets and Frank Thomas homered.

Thomas hit 34 homers with 94 RBI in 1962. He hit 52 homers in three homers for the Mets. Sherman was 0-4 with a 7.71 ERA in eight games for the Mets in 1962, his only season with the team and his last year in the major leagues.



Apr 09

Memo To Harvey: Quit Whining And Just Pitch

Matt Harvey is pitching today, and with this event comes the question: Is he more interested in being a New York media darling or a Mets’ star?

It seems that way..

Like everybody else, I was enamored with the possibility of what Harvey could bring to the Mets and whether he could help them become a viable franchise again.

HARVEY: On his throne. (ESPN)

HARVEY: On his throne. (ESPN)

The operative word is “help,’’ because not one player can do it by himself, which I say because Harvey seems to be separating himself from the “common folk,’’ who are his teammates.

However, he comes off as someone not interested in the collaborative effort – that he knows best – but who rather marches to his own beat. So be it when you have the track record to back it up, but he has only 12 victories in the major leagues.

He is “potential over proven commodity,’’ which makes his threat for people to judge him by his pitching and not his off-the-field life laughable.

That’s hard to do because Harvey throws his off-the-field life into our faces on a regular basis, whether it be posing nude for ESPN; arguing with the front office where to do his rehab; letting himself be photographed in public kissing models or taking them to see the Rangers; or disregarding the perception of being seen at a Yankees game to watch Derek Jeter.

That didn’t go over well with management and some of his teammates, but he doesn’t care. He also doesn’t acknowledge his own recklessness of trying to pitch through obvious pain and not reporting the discomfort in his forearm could have contributed to his elbow injury.

Apparently, making that start in the All-Star Game was more important than anything else.

Take a look at his smirk in the accompanying photograph. Who, but somebody with a huge ego would allow himself to be photographed that way?

No, we don’t see the effort behind-the-scenes of his workouts and conditioning, but we do hear about his off-the-field exploits of wanting to bed as many women as Jeter and his clubbing and drinking.

Good for him. Joe Namath, Walt Frazier and Mickey Mantle were New York media icons, but had the accomplishments to back it up. Harvey has won 12 games.

In the end, the nightlife killed Mantle and destroyed the playing careers of Darryl Strawberry and Dwight Gooden. It is also part of why the Mets didn’t bring back Jose Reyes.

However, Harvey is young and walks with the attitude “it won’t happen to me.’’

But, it can. The questions are “when’’ and “where.’’ Will it be in Queens or the Bronx as a Yankee? Crosstown, it seems, is where he really wants to be.

At least, that’s the perception, not that he wants to be a star with the Mets, who by the way, are his employers who have the right to judge him.

Sure, I’m all for honoring Harvey’s diva-like demand to judge him on his pitching. OK,  then just shut up and pitch and don’t distract us with the other stuff.


Mar 24

Mets Matters: Injury Updates; Gee Solid In Loss

GM Sandy Alderson said he’s optimistic Daniel Murphy could be ready for Opening Day.

Murphy has been down with a pulled right hamstring – an injury that always takes longer to recover than is initially diagnosed – since March 19. At first, it was described as tightness. It was then revised to be a pulled muscle with an estimated down period of one to two weeks.

mets-matters logoAlderson told reporters he based his thinking on, “the results of the MRI, the doctors’ evaluation and just how Daniel himself feels.’’

Murphy is scheduled to resume baseball activities Wednesday.

Meanwhile, shortstop Wilmer Flores resumed light activities today and manager Terry Collins said he might be able to play in an exhibition game Thursday.

Flores fouled a ball off his left foot and sustained a severe bruise. He had been wearing a walking boot but stopped using it.

Also, reliever Vic Black is down with weakness in his throwing shoulder and the probability is he’ll open the season on the disabled list. The Mets are making no pretenses he’ll be ready by Opening Day.

Will any of these guys be ready by Opening Day? Remember, when it comes to Mets’ injuries, always take the over.

GEE SOLID IN LOSS: Dillon Gee continues to impress for the Mets, who still won’t announce when he’ll make his first start of the season.

Gee threw four scoreless innings in Tuesday’s 4-3 loss to the Houston Astros at Tradition Field. The Mets held a late lead, but Carlos Torres gave up two eighth-inning runs. Torres, who is penciled into one of the Mets’ seven bullpen slots, has a 5.87 ERA this spring.

David Wright hit his third homer for the Mets, who are 12-10 this spring.

WHEELER SURGERY TOMORROW: Zack Wheeler will undergo Tommy John surgery Wednesday in New York. Club physician David Altchek will perform the surgery.

Wheeler will miss this season and isn’t expected to pitch again until June of 2016.

UP NEXT: The Mets travel to Tampa Wednesday to face the Yankees. Rafael Montero will get the start. The Mets said Lucas Duda, Travis d’Arnaud and Juan Lagares would make the trip.