Apr 13

Today In Mets’ History: Lose First Home Opener

National League baseball returned to New York on this date in 1962 in front of 12,447 freezing fans on a blustery day at the Polo Grounds. The Mets lost 4-3 to Pittsburgh.

Can you believe it? The Mets only drew 12,447 people in the first home in their history.

Frank Thomas hit the first home homer. Pitcher Sherman Jones – who took the loss – had the first home hit in franchise history.

The opened the first season two days earlier with an 11-4 loss in St. Louis.

The Mets would lose their first nine games before their first victory in franchise history at Pittsburgh. They would finish April at 3-13, 9.5 games out of first place.

The Mets finished in last place that season with a 40-120 record, only 60.5 games behind the San Francisco Giants.

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Mar 28

Harvey’s Ailment Cause For Concern

The Mets shutting down Matt Harvey for the remainder of spring training with an undisclosed medical ailment reminds us of the fragility of an athlete. The Mets aren’t being specific as to the nature of the problem, but are saying it isn’t his elbow or shoulder. Agent Scott Boras hasn’t commented. Opening Day is up in the air. And, Harvey could return to New York for tests.

I would definitely say there’s reason to be concerned.

HARVEY: Opening Day in limbo. (Getty)

HARVEY: Opening Day in limbo. (Getty)

Harvey was scheduled to pitch Tuesday, but that’s not happening. Nobody knows for sure when Harvey will pitch again.

“It’s a non-baseball medical issue that we have to address,” Alderson told reporters. “It came up this morning as far as I know. There will be some follow-up tests and consultation that will take place over the next couple of days.”

Alderson said Harvey will undergo tests and the results might not be known for several days. That will only lead to speculation.

“I think it’s a little early to attach any level of concern,” Alderson said. “I think we need to wait for more medical information before we decide it’s of concern, or great concern, or no concern. It’s way too premature for us to be discussing anything related to Opening Day.

“I understand Opening Day is not too far away, but we’re dealing with tomorrow, and we should know something more tomorrow – or the next day. But right now he’s not pitching tomorrow. That’s kind of where the story ends.”

Only it won’t be ending as the questions are only beginning, with not the least of them being: “If you’re a Mets’ fan should you be concerned?”

I would think, yes.

 

 

 

Mar 11

Mets’ Depth Will Come To Play Early

Depth was to be a Mets’ strong point this year, and it will come into play a lot earlier than anticipated with shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera expected to miss the start of the season with a strained patella tendon in his left knee. Ruben Tejada, who lost his job after Cabrera was acquired and recently has been the subject of trade rumors to St. Louis, is starting again.

TEJADA: Back in line up. (AP)

TEJADA: Back in line up. (AP)

“[Cabrera] may not be ready for opening day, and that’s one of the reasons we have the depth on our roster that we have now,” Mets GM Sandy Alderson told reporters Friday. “If he’s ready in three or four weeks, it’s essentially the first week of the season and we’ll be in pretty good shape.”

Cabrera was in New York Friday at the Hospital of Special Surgery to receive a platelet-rich plasma injection. He was injured Thursday when he was running the bases and didn’t slide.

“I was running – with the fly ball  to second, and thinking slide,” Cabrera said. “I saw the bad throw, so I tried to stay up. I felt something in my knee. It’s sore right now.”

With Cabrera in the first season of a two-year, 8.5-million contract, the Mets hoped to unload Tejada – who will make $3 million in 2016 – for a prospect before losing him to free-agency next winter.

Timing is everything, and right now it isn’t good for Cabrera. It’s better for Tejada, and it could be good in the long run for the Mets. When Cabrera returns – and there are no setbacks – and if Tejada plays well and proves his leg is sound, it could enhance his trade value.

 

 

Mar 06

Why Utley’s Suspension Was Dropped

Mets’ fans won’t be pleased with this, but Chase Utley‘s two-game suspension was dropped by Major League Baseball. Utley was suspended for his aggressive take-out slide in Game 2 of the NLDS that broke Ruben Tejada‘s right leg.

Baseball’s policeman, Joe Torre, called the slide illegal for being a “rolling block” occurring away from the base. The suspension resulted from an outcry by Mets’ fans and New York media, and I believe was issued to avoid an ugly scene when the NLDS moved to Citi Field.

Utley appealed – as was his right – and didn’t play in the games in New York.

TEJADA: Suspension dropped. (AP)

TEJADA: Suspension dropped. (AP)

Here’s why I think the suspension was dropped:

* The umpire’s have discretion to eject a player if they deem it to be a dirty play and they did not.

* There was a take-out rule already in place dictating the runner must be able to reach the bag with his foot or hand and apparently the umpires believed this to be the case with Utley. (watch video)

* Replays showed Wilmer Flores‘ throw put Tejada in an awkward position, one in which he turned into Utley’s slide. This was not the runner’s fault.

* That Utley did not play in the two New York games could be viewed as a de facto suspension.

* Reaction among those in MLB is mixed between dirty and just aggressive. There was hardly a consensus in either position.

* MLB adopted a new rule on break-up slides.

When asked about the suspension Sunday, Tejada told reporters: “I don’t care really. I don’t care. I care about me. I’m healthy here. I’m happy here. So I don’t care about what’s going to happen there or what’s the decision they take there.”

Said Mets GM Sandy Alderson: “The most important thing is that the rule was changed.”