Aug 11

Six-Man Rotation Might Benefit Mets And Jon Niese

Jon Niese will make his first start for the New York Mets in nearly two months this afternoon today in Phoenix. It is arguably one of the most important starts by a Met starter this season.

Those made by Matt Harvey and Zach Wheeler generated more excitement, but for future planning, this is hugely important because it dictates their off-season objectives.

NIESE: What's he thinking?

NIESE: What’s he thinking?

Niese lasted just 3.1 innings in his last start, June 20, at Atlanta, after which it was discovered he had a partially-torn rotator cuff. He went on the disabled list two days later. Niese passed all the medical tests, so it is assumed he’s good to go.

The Mets need to test Niese with kid gloves for the remainder of the season, and figuring no further complications it would streamline the Mets’ off-season shopping list.

If Niese is reinjured, don’t expect an early return next year, and assume they will attempt to add another starter this winter. They could go again with Jeremy Hefner, who has hit the skids since the All-Star break, or they could add another solution like Shaun Marcum.

Yeah, I thought that might get your attention.

Niese gave up three runs on eight hits in that start against the Braves, with five strikeouts and no walks. The most important number is where he landed on the pain meter, which was pretty high.

With Niese’s return to the rotation, the Mets will continue with a six-man starter, which under these circumstances is a prudent move for several reasons: 1) it protects Niese; 2) it lengthens the time between Hefner starts; and 3) it allows the Mets to reduce the starts, and thereby innings, of Harvey and Wheeler.

Most importantly, it will give the Mets an understanding of where Niese stands physically and their off-season needs while protecting him. That’s their most important pitching objective for now, even more than reducing Harvey’s and Wheeler’s innings.

Nobody knows whether the Mets will need to reduce Harvey and Wheeler next season, but assuming they will, this experience can only help them in developing a between-starts routine.

In four games against Arizona, Niese is 1-2 with a 6.85 ERA, including an 11-5 loss last July. However, those numbers aren’t as important as the simple fact Niese is starting another game this season.

For those thinking the Mets have nothing to play for or learn the remainder of the season, guess again.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 01

What Zack Wheeler Brings To Mets

MLB: New York Mets at Atlanta BravesZack Wheeler proved why he has the potential to transform the New York Mets into legitimate contenders this week after a sterling pitching performance that saw him take a no-hitter into the seventh inning against the Marlins.

The 23-year-old has flashed much of the raw ability and plus offerings that have made him one of the top right-handed pitching prospects in the game three years running.

As the Mets move closer to becoming a perennial contender built on a foundation of formidable starting pitching, MLB betting fans look to operators like casino tropez online to find the betting odds for the Mets improving much as their fortunes are.

Wheeler is still trying to find consistency within his delivery, but continues to work with pitching coach Dan Warthen after every start as he strives to refine his delivery.

“I just have to figure out my motion,” Wheeler said. “It’s about finding a motion that works for me.”

The key for the young righty will be consistency, and in his last start he delivered perhaps his best and most dominating performance since his promotion. He continues to evolve and as he gets better, so do the betting odds for the Mets.

The Mets can already see the bright futures that await Wheeler and his teammate and ace pitcher Matt Harvey. The two of them have invoked memories of past Mets 1-2 punches like Seaver and Koosman and Gooden and Darling.

The scouts and talent evaluators all agree that the Mets are on the verge of something special. To that end the Mets will play it safe and ensure that they do not overwork their prized young pitchers.

Both of them will have less than ten starts left to the season and their innings pitched will be monitored closely.

They will be protecting their investment by going to a six-man rotation, even if it means playing with a short bench. It’s a risk worth taking and the rewards could come as soon as the 2014 season.

Jul 24

Ike Davis Showing Signs

Ike Davis is nowhere close to where he wants to be as a player, and the New York Mets are taking the second half to see if he fits into their plans. Unless Davis goes on a complete tear the next two months, the odds are very good the Mets will not tender a contract and let him go as a free agent.

Understandably, their fear is he’ll walk and become a start someplace else. Nobody will blow them away with a trade offer, so he’s staying out the season.

DAVIS: Looking to smile again. (AP)

DAVIS: Looking to smile again. (AP)

Davis is currently in a platoon with Josh Satin, which he’s understandably not happy about, but he’s not moaning or complaining. He is supportive of Satin. Davis is being the good soldier, albeit publicly, about a disappointing time in his career.

Davis doubled in the tie-breaking run in the sixth inning Tuesday night, but I liked his failed bunt attempt more. It shows his head is in the game; it shows he’s trying to improvise. It shows he’s not going through the motions.

“I mean, I get out a lot anyway, so might as well give it a try,’’ Davis said. “If I get it down in the right spot, it’s a hit. I’m definitely gonna try to do that more often.’’

Davis is supposed to be a power hitter, but with only five homers on the year, he needs to just try to get on base. It doesn’t matter if it is a walk, or broken-bat bloop or a bunt.

Bunting against the shift is difficult because pitchers often pitch inside to induce the hitter to pull into the shift. Davis bunted back to the mound, but the important thing was he wasn’t thinking about driving the ball, but about getting on base.

It was a team first play by Davis, when he could have been tempted to swing for the fences. Later, Davis stayed back on a curveball for a double off the wall in right.

“It definitely feels great to get [a hit], off a curveball, and to get the winning run across the plate,’’ Davis said. “And to drive the ball — I hadn’t driven the ball in a while.’’

Davis is a young player with a lot of room to grow. He’s had good moments, such as hitting 32 homers last year. When he first came up he showed a propensity of going the other way with a pitch and showing patience enough to wait out a pitcher.

He’s hitting .178 overall, but .257 since returning from Las Vegas.  That’s certainly not great, but a sign of progress. We’re not going to see 32 homers from Davis, and probably not even 20. But, after how this season started, progress is a good thing.

ON DECK: Mets notebook

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Jul 06

Ike Davis And Zack Wheeler Bounce Back; Mets Have Decision On Josh Satin

Ike Davis and Zack Wheeler, two key, but struggling players for the New York Mets, came up big Friday night in Milwaukee. In his return from the minors, Davis had three hits, while Wheeler, who was hit hard in his previous start, settled down by throwing more fastballs.

They didn’t have great nights, but most importantly persevered. Davis still had his hitch, but it wasn’t as pronounced. He was quieter at the plate, saying he was “calming everything down.’’

WHEELER: Gets second win. (AP)

WHEELER: Gets second win. (AP)

Wheeler remains a project, but his confidence had to get a boost because he completed five innings and didn’t get overwhelmed by a two-run first. He was especially impressive getting out of a bases-loaded jam in his final inning.

Pitchers aren’t just measured when the mow down an offense, but when they escape trouble. It’s a long process from phenom to dominance, and that will come by reducing his pitch count. He threw 98 in five innings, with only 56 going for strikes.

That will change in time, and hopefully, unlike Davis, he can make the corrections without going to the minors.

Rather than lament his demotion, Davis said all the right things, such that he learned while he was down there and worked hard.

“It’s still not fun to see .160 or whatever is on the scoreboard,’’ Davis told reporters last night at Miller Park. “But I’ve got a lot of time and I can make things up in a hurry. … Leaving on a bad note and coming back on a good note, it’s nice. Hopefully I can continue this and make up some ground.’’

Davis also had praise for his replacement, Josh Satin, who is carrying a ten-game hitting streak.

The Mets have decisions to make on Davis and Satin, notably, which one of them is their future? Davis is making $3.1 million this year, which will increase in 2014. The Mets must decide if they want to tender him a contract or let him become a free agent, or even if they want to trade him. Satin hit well enough to draw interest should the Mets dangle him.

Manager Terry Collins said it is not an option to platoon Davis and Satin, and he will try to keep the latter relevant. Satin, who is hitting .353, was performing because of regular at-bats. It doesn’t look as if he’ll get them now.

Collins said Satin will hit against some lefties, and could also get time at third, second and in the outfield.

“You don’t do what Josh Satin did and then, all of a sudden, go sit on the bench. That’s not going to work,’’ Collins pledged. “I’m going to try to figure out how to get him in there, where to play him.’’

We shall see.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jun 28

Mets Should Explore Trading Ike Davis To Yankees

Why is Ike Davis still in Triple-A Las Vegas when the New York Mets should be exploring all their options, including trading him to the Bronx?

With Mark Teixeira out for the remainder of the season after re-injuring his wrist, and with a good chance the Mets won’t tender Davis in the off-season and let him walk, shouldn’t two plus two equal four?

DAVIS: Mets should be talking to Yanks about him.

DAVIS: Mets should be talking to Yanks about him.

The Yankees remain contenders despite not having Teixeira, Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez and Curtis Granderson. Who knows if, and when, they’ll return? In the interim, Davis might give them a boost.

The Yankees’ offense has been as barren as the Mets’ have been, but because of their starting pitching, Mariano Rivera and a fast start, they are still a potential force in the AL East.

However, they are in need of a first baseman and a bat. Travis Hafner can no longer play first and his bat has cooled considerably. You’d think the Yankees would jump at the chance to add a left-handed power hitter such as Davis, who is making a little over $3 million.

That would be a very easy contract for the Yankees to pick up, and if it doesn’t work out they can always non-tender Davis this winter. Either way, does anybody really expect to see Davis in Flushing in 2014?

Davis is starting to hit in Vegas and was recently named the Pacific Coast Player of the Week. I can see him salivating at the opportunity to hit at Yankee Stadium.

Despite Davis’ rising numbers in Vegas, the Mets are reluctant to bring him up, citing facing a pair of left-handers against both the Nationals and Diamondbacks in their upcoming homestand at Citi Field. That should tell you something about the Mets’ feelings regarding Davis. If they thought he has found it, he’d be heading on a plane to New York.

Perhaps, the Yankees can see the same thing in Davis. However, they aren’t dealing from a position of strength, and desperate times could mean the desperate measure of trading for Davis.

Davis appears to have worn out his welcome with the Mets, while Phil Hughes and Joba Chamberlain are reportedly done after this year with the Yankees. They won’t get both, but I’d trade Davis for Hughes even-up in a heartbeat.

A change of scenery could work for all concerned. This could work with some tweaking.

Sandy Alderson should be on the phone with Brian Cashman, and soon.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos