Apr 18

Mets Aim To Continue Streak Behind DeGrom

It is no secret I am not a fan of the New York Mets’ batting order, but as a baseball traditionalist I know this much, you don’t screw around with a hot streak and the Mets are going after their seventh straight win tonight against Miami.

That means Curtis Granderson leading off, Travis d’Arnaud batting second and Juan Lagares seventh.

The Mets have to feel good about number seven because they’ll be giving the ball to Jacob deGrom, who is a lifetime 2-0 with a 1.67 ERA in four starts against Miami. He’s struck out 34 in 27 innings in those four games.

In his last start, deGrom threw 6.1 scoreless innings in a 2-0 victory over Philadelphia on Opening Day.

Said d’Arnaud: “He’s a special, special pitcher. He’s got great stuff, and most of all he’s got heart. He showed it (Monday), when he went out there and battled.’’

Here’s tonight’s batting order:

Curtis Granderson, RF

Travis d’Arnaud

Lucas Duda, 1B

Michael Cuddyer, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Eric Campbell, 3B

Juan Lagares, CF

Wilmer Flores, SS

Jacob deGrom, RHP

Apr 18

Circumstances Point To Gee Departure

The math adds up to the conclusion the New York Mets – two weeks into the season – are ready to move on from Dillon Gee.

Gee gave the Mets the required innings in two unimpressive starts, but recent circumstances conspired to making it impossible for them to allow him time to work out his problems and fall into a groove.

GEE: On thin ice. (Getty)

GEE: On thin ice. (Getty)

GM Sandy Alderson finally realized the Mets can’t exist with a four-man bench so they promoted utility infielder Danny Muno.

Well, to bring him up, somebody had to go down, but whom?

The Mets like Rafael Montero’s upside as a starter more than out of the bullpen, where he has a 4.15 ERA in four appearances, and with Vic Black and Bobby Parnell about to come off the disabled list, he was the logical one.

In conjunction with Montero’s demotion, the Mets say he will be stretched out so he can be used as a starter April 28 against Miami. The Mets also said Montero could get more than one start, and since they will not go to a six-man rotation more than one time, and a trade not imminent, where does that leave Gee?

They currently have seven relievers, and with Black, and then, Parnell, to be activated that would require two moves. Buddy Carlyle and Erik Goeddel are the most logical, or one of the three left-handers could also go.

A third reliever would have to go down if the Mets opt to use Gee in long relief, but that hasn’t seriously been discussed. Maybe they’ll send him down, or trade him for next to nothing, or just release him.

Several days ago I wrote why I admired Gee and those reasons still stand. However, it really doesn’t matter because it figures he won’t be around much longer.


Apr 15

Mets Put Wright On DL; Bench Still Thin

The names changed but the numbers remained the same for the New York Mets, who placed David Wright on the 15-day disabled list today with a strained right hamstring and recalled Eric Campbell. Wright underwent a MRI this morning, took a cortisone injection and will be idle for the next two days.

WRIGHT: Goes on DL. (AP)

WRIGHT: Goes on DL. (AP)

It was the prudent course, especially since Wright has a history of trying to play through injuries. Wright is as tough as they come, but this time he knew he couldn’t continue after being injured stealing second base in the eighth inning Tuesday night.

“A couple of feet before the bag I just felt my hamstring grab,” Wright said. “I thought it might be something that I could stretch out a little bit. But then I took a couple of secondary leads and just realized that if the ball was put in play I wouldn’t have been able to do anything positive, that’s for sure. It took a couple of pitches, and it didn’t get any better. That’s when I thought I’d rather say something and hopefully catch this thing before I make the same mistake I made a couple of years ago, when I tried to play through it and made it worse.

“Anytime you feel something like that, you hope that it goes away. And this just didn’t go away.”

The Mets got away from playing Anthony Recker at third base. There wasn’t a ball hit to him, but the inept Phillies didn’t try to bunt except for one half-hearted attempt. Dumb baseball on their part, but lucky for Mets.

The Mets had no other choice but disable Wright because their other options were weak. Moving Lucas Duda left first base exposed. Moving Daniel Murphy left a hole at second. Using a pitcher would have been a horrible idea.

OK, the Mets got away with it last night, but foolishly they will keep eight in the bullpen and still be left with a thin bench. They were lucky the game didn’t go long, or Travis d’Arnaud wasn’t injured, or somebody else wasn’t hurt.

They foolishly insist on playing with a thin bench. I don’t think that’s a good idea, but then again, I didn’t invent baseball.


Apr 15

No Fooling Around; Put Wright On DL

They wouldn’t be the New York Mets if they didn’t have adversity. First they opened the season without three key relievers. Then they lose Zack Wheeler to injury and Jenrry Mejia to stupidity.

WRIGHT: Facing DL with hamstring pull. (AP)

WRIGHT: Facing DL with hamstring pull. (AP)

Now they face losing David Wright indefinitely with a pulled right hamstring. Wright is undergoing a MRI this morning and Eric Campbell has already been flown in. Wright will go to the disabled list, but with this type of injury, for how long is anybody’s guess.

They’ve played fast and loose with injuries – including to Wright before – but they can’t afford to screw around this time. Wright needs to go on the DL, and even admitted as such.

Several times Wright – by his own admission – foolishly tried to play through an injury. He tried to test it last night, but left the field quickly.

“`I knew it was something bad,” said manager Terry Collins, who added normally would wrap it up and play the next day.

Not this time and Wright knows it.

In a concession to age and experience, not to mention leadership, Wright said: “The last thing I want to do is go out there and do what I did a couple of years ago, where I feel something, you don’t say anything, you try to play through it and you end up missing a significant amount of time rather than something that’s relatively shorter.”

Wright’s injury exposed the Mets’ thin bench as back-up catcher Anthony Recker played first base.

The Mets also considered using Lucas Duda, but that would have left Recker playing first. They could have also used Daniel Murphy. They had other options, but none of them good.

It was a close game and they were lucky nothing happened. They are obviously exposed and it came close to biting them last night.

GM Sandy Alderson might not like it, but he must put together a conventional roster.



Apr 08

The Bizarre World Of The Mets’ Batting Order

Welcome to the sometimes puzzling, and often maddening world of the New York Mets, where one can’t help but wonder how long before the Sandy Alderson-Terry Collins inevitable explosion.

Tick, tick, tick …

ALDERSON: What color is the sky in his world? (AP)

ALDERSON: What color is the sky in his world? (AP)

From now on I should refer to Alderson as the Mets’ general manager/manager because he seems hell bent on undermining Collins. The Mets’ lineup, bizarre to say the least, is there again for the baseball world to laugh at in the second game of the season.

Here goes and I hope you’re not eating:

Curtis Granderson, rf: One of the few legitimate Mets’ power hitters is at the top of the order instead of the middle where he would benefit from more RBI opportunities. That he walked twice Opening Day is irrelevant.

David Wright, 3b: Normally a team’s best hitter – the combination of power and average – bats third, yet Wright, who is coming off a strong spring training is second. Until Monday, he hadn’t hit there since 2010.

Lucas Duda, 1b: Yes, he had two RBI Monday, but he’s coming off a 30-homer season and is the club’s best power hitter. That means fourth.

Michael Cuddyer, lf: He needs to bat fifth to separate lefty hitters Duda and Granderson. Did the Mets really sign him to be a clean-up hitter?

Daniel Murphy, 2b: I can buy, in part, the reasoning of batting Murphy lower to give him more RBI chances. But, he’s not a power hitter and batting second would offer the best protection to a potential base stealer.

Juan Lagares, cf: After spending all spring trying to develop into a leadoff hitter – and he did a good job – they yank him from that role and bury him sixth. By the way, he is that potential base stealer. But, he’s not likely to do much running this low in the order.

Travis d’Arnaud, c: Off all the slots in the order, this makes the most sense. But, he’s certainly not the type of hitter that can take pitches to help Lagares.

Jacob deGrom, rhp: Yes, they are doing with the nonsense of batting the pitcher eighth. This was Tony La Russa’s attempt to re-invent the wheel. Question: If La Russa was such a genius, why didn’t more manager follow his lead with this? By the way, Alderson and La Russa worked together in Oakland, so it is clear to see whose fingerprints are all over this.

Wilmer Flores, ss: Supposedly, Flores is an offensive player, yet he’s buried ninth.

I’m not blaming Collins for this, because it is obvious this isn’t his call.