Feb 08

Anticipation Growing For Mets’ Harvey

The circus that will soon be the New York Mets’ spring training is days away when Matt Harvey will roll into Port St. Lucie. Then the questions will start, and won’t likely stop any time soon,

How’s your arm feel? When will you throw? Will you be ready for Opening Day? What’s your innings limit this season? How’s your arm feel?

Harvey will be asked about his arm before and after every start. He’ll also be asked how he felt about missing all of last season, and whether he should have been allowed to pitch.

While pitchers-and-catchers report next week, Harvey is expected to arrive early.

“There’s always that question mark,’’ Jonathon Niese, who is already in Port St. Lucie, told reporters. “I know he works his tail off and I know he’ll be ready. I don’t think there’s anybody who wants it more than he does.’’

That is, unless you discount every Mets’ fan who anguished over this team over the past decade.

Harvey spent much of his offseason working out at Citi Field and also training at the compound run by his agent, Scott Boras.

There’s a growing excitement surrounding this Mets’ team and Harvey is a big part of the anticipation. He was the talk of the town two summers ago, and spent a lot of time in the news last year, often complaining about wanting to pitch despite the Mets’ objections.

He’s again the talk of the Mets, and the organization and its fans can’t be any more excited.

 

Feb 07

Baseball-America’s Top Ten Mets’ Prospects

As it does every year, Baseball-America has come up with its top ten prospects list. The following is the New York Mets’ list:

Noah Syndergaard, rhp

Steve Matz, lhp

Brandon Nimmo, of

Dilson Herrera, 2b/ss

Kevin Plawecki, c

Amed Rosario, ss

Michael Conforto, of

Rafael Montero, rhp

Marcos Molina, rhp

Gavin Cecchini, ss

It’s not a surprise Syndergaard tops the list, and we should see him at Citi Field sometime after June so the Mets can protect his Super Two status. We should also see Plawecki, Montero and Herrera this summer, with the latter possibly making the Opening Day roster as he made a positive impression last year.

Herrera is one of three prospects who can play shortstop. Cecchini is highly regarded, but still a few years away. That probably went into their decision not to pursue a shortstop this winter.

 

 

Jan 22

Mets Who Could Be Gone After This Year

As a team trying to reach the next level, the New York Mets have several players entering make-or-break seasons. If they don’t produce in 2015 they could find themselves gone next year.

The reasons for their potential departure range from age, to finances, to performance. Here’s who I am thinking needs to put up or shut up:

Bartolo Colon: At 41, Colon is entering the second season of a two-year contract. Despite working 200 innings last season, the Mets are trying to trade him. They certainly won’t bring him back for another $10 million. The best scenario is to find a taker at the trade deadline.

Jon Niese: All the reasons why Niese was attractive in the past – age, left-handed, reasonable contract – don’t matter much anymore because of his recent injury history and poor performance. Their best bet is for him to pitch well in the first half and draw trade interest.

Bobby Parnell: He’s coming off an injury and has never pitched to expectations. With Jenrry Mejia and Jeurys Familia showing promise, it could be time to cut the cord and move on. This guy had a million-dollar arm, but only recently showed an understanding about pitching. If he’s a bust this year, why would they bring him back?

Curtis Granderson: He has two more years after 2015, which could make him easier to trade. But, if he doesn’t show glimpses of substantial power who would take him? This much we know about the Mets – they will try to get something and won’t eat his contract.

Travis d’Arnaud: He showed some promise in 2014, but the Mets want more offensive production. I can see them moving on if he doesn’t hit this summer.

Daniel Murphy: Like I said when Murphy agreed to a 2015 contract, this year will be his last. Had the Mets wanted to keep him they would have signed him a while ago. Ideally, they’d like to get something in return, but if they don’t, they will let him walk.

Wilmer Flores: This is his chance. The Mets have been looking for a shortstop for a few years, but Flores goes in as the starter by default. They considered a few names this winter, but none seriously. If Flores doesn’t pan out, but their young pitching does, the Mets might be forced to pay up next winter.

 

Jan 06

Why Didn’t The Mets Lobby For Piazza?

As a Hall of Fame voter, I received emails from several teams over the years lobbying for my vote for one of their players. Seattle wrote me about Edgar Martinez and Boston did likewise for Jim Rice.

There were others.

However, I never received a note from the New York Mets regarding Mike Piazza and I don’t know why.

Surely, it reflects positively on the organization if one of their own gets to Cooperstown. Piazza is one of the more popular players in franchise history, so where’s the love?

I can’t believe the organization doesn’t care, because they’ve gone out of their way to include him in team events in the past.

The only thing I can immediately think of is they are afraid of being embarrassed if he gets in and the PED accusations are later proven true. Or, perhaps they don’t want to be connected to a player with any chance of being linked to steroids.

I voted for Piazza and I didn’t need any lobbying from the Mets. The voting figures to be close, but early reports have Piazza falling short. The announcement will come this afternoon.

Could any stumping by the Mets closed the gap? Hopefully not, but maybe the Mets will get another chance next year.

Jan 03

Safety Nets Could Be Gone For Collins In 2015

When the New York Mets extended Terry Collins the past few years, they did so with the reasoning of injuries and the inability of the front office to provide him with quality talent.

Collins shouldn’t expect those safety nets if the Mets sputter again this year.

Despite still having general manager Sandy Alderson having an aversion to spending, the Mets have been pointing to this summer because of the return of Matt Harvey.

The thinking in Flushing is a healthy Harvey will push the Mets over .500 for the first time since 2008 when they finished 89-73. Since then, ten teams qualified for the playoffs with at least that record.

In addition to Harvey’s return from elbow surgery, the Mets have issues with Curtis Granderson’s return into a potent offensive force, David Wright coming back from injuries, and their concerns with Juan Lagares and Wilmer Flores becoming full-time players.

There are also questions in the rotation and bullpen, and behind the plate. Those are all important questions, but the Mets don’t seem inclined to throw money at them.

That squarely puts the onus on Collins.