Feb 26

Alderson Weighs In On Shortstop Situation; So Far, Endorses Tejada By Default

New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson danced around published reports critical of Ruben Tejada’s conditioning and steady media demands to sign Stephen Drew.

Earlier this week, The New York Post, citing unnamed sources, said despite Tejada training in the offseason at a Michigan fitness camp he didn’t look any more in shape than he did last season.

TEJADA: Holding on (Getty)

TEJADA: Holding on (Getty)

When Tejada first reported, manager Terry Collins said the shortstop, whose job is on the line this spring, looked good physically.

The off-the-record comment could have come from anywhere: from a front office official, a coach or a player. By club rule, the medical staff isn’t permitted to speak to the media.

“Look, we have probably 30 front office and coaching staff down here,’’ Alderson told the MLB Network. “There’s going to be a stray comment about players from time to time. That’s unfortunately the nature of the media in New York. It’s so pervasive that comments like that are going to be gleaned from time to time.’’

If indeed the comment came from a front office official, that could have easily been prevented if Alderson ordered his staff not to speak. It’s done all the time in all sports and provides an effective muzzle.

Alderson, who said during the winter Tejada could open the season at shortstop, still said the team is looking for improvement.

“We were happy with what Ruben did in the offseason,’’ Alderson said. “We’re hopeful that he’ll show significant improvement on the field – back to the levels he has demonstrated, so it’s not an unrealistic hope. But we continue to look at our middle-infield situation.’’

There’s no way that can be interpreted as an endorsement.

Ever since the day after the season, which ended with Tejada out with a fractured leg, there have been reports the Mets were interested in Boston free agent Stephen Drew. However, his $14.1 million qualifying offer from the Red Sox, which would cost the Mets a compensatory draft pick, was a deterrent.

Even so, the reports persisted.

“There’s been a lot of talk about Stephen Drew obviously,’’ Alderson said. “My own personal view is at this point, Stephen and his agent are reviewing the situation and perhaps looking at a strategy that prolongs this situation into the regular season or even into June.’’

Alderson didn’t say if the job would be Tejada’s until June.

Drew is currently working out in a facility in Miami owned by his agent, Scott Boras.

In the wake of Nelson Cruz signing with the Orioles – he wanted a five-year, $75-million deal, but settled for a one-year, $8-million contract – there’s been speculation Drew would reconsider.

Despite claims Drew might wait until June – when the draft pick compensation condition would be lifted after the draft – there’s been so signs Boras will back down.

“From our standpoint, look, it does appear that we would be a logical landing spot for someone like Stephen Drew,’’ Alderson said. “But, at the same time, we have to make our own, independent evaluation and cost-benefit computation and act accordingly, which is what we have done.’’

Translation: Drew remains too expensive.

The Mets are also discussing a trade with Seattle for infielder Nick Franklin, who reportedly would require pitching in return.

Whatever option the Mets choose, it is clear they are not enamored with Tejada. If by chance they can’t land somebody and Tejada keeps the job by default, he needs a big year to stay with the Mets in 2015.

ON DECK: More injuries.

Feb 24

No Guarantee Mets Would Have Gotten Nelson Cruz For Bargain Price

It is an oversimplification to suggest the New York Mets could have signed Nelson Cruz for the same $8 million the Orioles did, if not a little more. Especially when juxtaposed against the Chris Young signing for $7.25 million.

I was against the Young signing, but that had nothing to do with Cruz, whom I would have balked against because of his connection to PEDs and defensive liabilities.

The Mets signed Young prior to the Winter Meetings when the market was fresh. Cruz was signed after spring training had begun.

Don’t forget at the time the Mets were apprehensive about giving up a compensatory draft pick. They didn’t have to surrender a pick for Young.

The market has dwindled dramatically since they signed Young. GM Sandy Alderson, who initially suggested he might let things play out in the market, had no way of knowing Cruz would sign for what he did, especially when the early reports had him asking for $75 million over five years.

Signing a power-hitting outfielder was a primary need and Alderson rolled the dice with Young. His odds were more in his favor later with Curtis Granderson.

But, for Cruz, who would have guessed this?

Maybe had the Mets re-visited Cruz with a low-ball offer, he could have signed with them, but the feeling is it wouldn’t have been a good fit because of the PED issue.

And, had they inked both Young and Cruz to one-year deals, the odds are good they would have needed to shop again for outfielders next winter.

As for Cruz, this is the best thing that could happen to him because it affords him an opportunity to put up monster numbers in bandbox Camden Yards and try free agency against next year.

ON DECK: Collins wants players to reveal injuries.

Feb 24

Drew Could Sit Out Until June

DREW: Should pass.

In the latest chapter of the Stephen Drew Chronicles, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports, contends that the free agent shortstop could sit out until after the First Year Player Draft in June. He further adds that fellow free agents Ervin Santana and Kendrys Morales could also sit out as well.

Such a move could strike a blow against major league baseball in that their former teams will no longer receive any draft pick compensation according to the Collective Bargaining Agreement. Additionally, the new teams will not be able to tender either of the players a qualifying offer next offseason because they were not with their team for a full season. It’s a loop hole and a strategy that has already been discussed between the players and their agents.

“A road map for this strategy has been figured out,” said Scott Boras who represents both Drew and Morales.

The draft pick compensation system has drawn a lot of criticism recently, including from Drew, but changes are unlikely to be made until after the current CBA expires after the 2016 season.

Boras and the agent for Santana both believe that they can spark change when it’s time to negotiate a new CBA because neither the Royals, Red Sox or Mariners will be very happy that they each lost the picks they expected back for their free agents who simply walk away without any compensation for their former teams.

On the flip side, players may become more open to accepting qualifying offers in the future rather than risk getting into a situation like Nelson Cruz who is the first player to sign a deal for less than the amount of the qualifying offer since the new CBA kicked in two years ago.

Where the Mets are concerned, if Drew were to sit out until June, would it behoove them to continue to pursue him or simply just wait four more months when a better class of free agents becomes available? Would it be wiser to then see how Ruben Tejada continues to perform while also keeping a close eye on how some of their top shortstop prospects develop?

It’s quite an interesting scenario either way you look at it. But I wonder if this is just a false threat by Boras to try and force an immediate resolution and get a new deal for his clients within the next week or so?

It’s weird right?

Feb 22

Wrapping Up The Day: Matt Harvey Throws; Mets Re-Fi; Collins To Ease In Vets

Matt Harvey’s first throwing session and news of the New York Mets’ refinancing their debt incurred from the Ponzi ruling were today’s most significant developments from the Mets’ spring training camp in Port St. Lucie.

Harvey made 20 throws on flat ground from 60 feet Saturday morning and described his feelings as “awesome.’’

Harvey will continue to throw on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. He described it as part of a process and acknowledged he must resist the urge to throw harder.

In addition:

* The Mets’ application to refinance was accepted with the organization several weeks away from having to make a $250-million payment. The five-year loan was priced at Libor plus 3.25 percent.

* Saturday was the first day of full-squad workouts. John Lannan, Gonzalez Germen, Rafael Montero and Scott Rice were among the pitchers to throw live batting practice.

* Manager Terry Collins plans to “ease’’ his veterans into spring training games. Daniel Murphy, David Wright and Curtis Granderson aren’t expected to play the first week.

* Overall, Collins is pleased with the workouts. “I have never seen the drills done with more enthusiasm, with more energy without major mistakes than we have in the last six days. It’s incredible,’’ Collins said.

* Prospect Erik Goeddel will work as a reliever during spring training and the regular season, said general manager Sandy Alderson, whose reasoning is the Mets’ starting pitching depth in the minors.

* Alderson will delay the decision where Harvey will rehab this season. He prefers Port St. Lucie; Harvey wants New York. Since there’s no need to make a decision now, he’ll wait to later in camp.

* Alderson expressed no regrets in the Mets signing outfielder Chris Young and not waiting to sign Nelson Cruz, who just agreed to an $8-million, one-year contract with Baltimore. That’s $750-thousand more than they’ll pay Young.

 

Feb 19

Trade Market Still Open For Ike Davis

New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson could be getting a second chance to trade first baseman Ike Davis.

The Mets didn’t want to go into spring training with the Davis-Lucas Duda logjam at first. However, their steep asking price coupled with their openness, if not eagerness, to trade Davis worked against them.

DAVIS: Still on the block.

DAVIS: Still on the block.

They appeared to favor Duda because of his better on-base percentage matched against horrific first-halves by Davis in 2012 and 2013. Davis’ 32 homers in 2012 seemed more and more fluke-like to Alderson.

Consequently, he tap-danced around their failure to trade Davis by saying he didn’t mind the open competition. Davis, from his perspective, said he was “in a bit of shock,’’ to still be with the Mets.

As spring training progresses teams with unsettled situations at first base will likely call the Mets about Davis, who’ll make a reasonable $3.5 million this year.

Reportedly, two of the original teams interested in Davis – Pittsburgh and Baltimore – are monitoring the Mets about Davis.

After losing lefty-hitting Justin Morneau in the off-season, the Pirates are considering a platoon of Davis with right-handed hitter Gaby Sanchez.

The Orioles meanwhile, are considering Nelson Cruz and Kendry Morales; both were made qualifying offers from Texas and Seattle, respectively, and would cost a compensatory draft pick.

The Orioles, who just lost the 17th overall pick in June’s draft for signing pitcher Ubaldo Jimenez from Cleveland, would not have to surrender a pick to the Mets if they signed Davis.

Alderson misjudged the market over the winter. With a second opportunity, he can’t afford a repeat, especially after making it known he wanted to trade Davis.

 MORE LATER TODAY