Mar 12

No Concerns About Colon Or Matz

On Saturday, the Cardinals took it to Bartolo Colon, and the day before the Nationals did likewise to Steven Matz. There’s no reason for the Mets to be concerned about either because there is still two weeks to go before the start of the season. There’s still plenty of time for both to get ready.

Colon gave up four runs on six hits in 3.2 innings. He’s been through this before.

“I feel healthy,” Colon told reporters through an interpreter, and isn’t that the most important thing? “Unfortunately, the way I pitched today, they gave me a little bit of a rough time and it wasn’t great. I thought I was throwing it where I wanted to, but the batters were about to get me. They took advantage”

These things happen. As long as Colon is not hurting, he’ll be fine.

Control was also the issue with Matz, as it often is the case with young pitchers early in spring training. Matz walked the first two batters he faced in the third, then gave up a single to load the bases. He threw 41 pitches in two-plus innings, but 27 were for strikes. Actually, that’s not too bad a ratio.

“I don’t think you ever care for walks,” Matz said Friday. I just got a little erratic there. It’s still early. … I felt good. I really wanted to stay in there and try to work out of that.”

The first thing pitchers want to accomplish early in spring training, and both Colon and Matz were making their second starts, is to be healthy, and that’s not an issue for either. Control, especially of breaking pitches, takes a few starts.

Healthwise, both are on schedule. There’s nothing for the Mets to be concerned about now.



Mar 03

Not Worried About Montero’s Rough Day

Rafael Montero got hammered Thursday afternoon, but no worries he wasn’t going to beat out Sean Gilmartin or Logan Verrett for a spot in the Mets’ bullpen anyway. Montero has always been ticketed as a starter at Triple-A Las Vegas barring an injury.

MONTERO: Rough day. (AP)

MONTERO: Rough day. (AP)

Montero gave up four runs on four hits and two walks in a 39-pitch first inning in the Mets’ 9-4 loss to Washington.

It didn’t matter that the first five Nationals reached base. What mattered was Montero, who was on the DL from April 30 through the remainder of the season with a bad shoulder, is healthy. Whether he starts at Vegas or works out the bullpen in Flushing, he can’t do either if he’s not healthy.

“I think it’s just key for me to be healthy right now. I’m happy with that,” Montero told reporters. “And, I’m really just looking at it as just the first time going out. Hopefully, everything will go better going forward.”

Part of the essence of spring training is what Montero went through today, and that’s a player coming back from an injury. Montero will pitch numerous more times this spring, perhaps compiling as many as 20 innings. But, regardless of how well he performs, unless somebody gets hurt, Montero will end up in Las Vegas.

When he gets there he should be used in a starting role, because he could end up in that position with the Mets if Zack Wheeler has a setback in his rehab. Should that be the case, his innings needs to be stretched out.

So, what happened Thursday has to be looked at as one of those things. Nothing seems to be going to imminently happen to Montero.

The same can’t be said for Yoenis Cespedes‘ pig.

Mar 02

Collins: “Time To Get To Work”

So far it has been all fun and giggles for the Mets in the early days of spring training, but with the exhibition schedule to begin Thursday against the Nationals, manager Terry Collins said it’s time to get serious.

His timing was right. It shows he has his fingers on the pulse of his team.

COLLINS: Time to get to work.  (AP)

COLLINS: Time to get to work. (AP)

Six straight days of showing up in camp with a different car by Yoenis Cespedes is one thing. It’s his money and he can do what he wants with it. Then there was Cespedes shelling out $7,000 for a prize pig. Again, it’s his money and if he throws a BBQ for his teammates, well, that’s more team bonding.

The kicker came when Cespedes and Noah Syndergaard rode horses into camp yesterday. That was the kicker for Collins, who thought there might have been too much fooling around, if not a little bit of recklessness because after all, either one of those guys could have fallen off and gotten hurt.

“The fun time is over,” Collins told reporters. “It’s time to finally get ready for baseball.”

As far as Cespedes, Collins doesn’t have a problem with him having fun for now.

“He does his drills,” Collins said. “He works hard. He’s getting ready to play. He’s having a little fun for the time being. But, like I said, it’s time to get ready for baseball now.”

Oct 21

Mets’ Fans And Murphy Should Cherish The Moment

Daniel Murphy has no explanation why he has homered in six straight games during this incredible playoff run by the Mets. He did it again Wednesday night and was named NLCS MVP.

“If I knew, I would have done it six years ago,’’ said Murphy, whose first inclination when asked is to credit his teammates. “I can’t explain it. I’m just going to ride this.”

He’ll ride it into the Mets’ fifth World Series appearance in their history, which begins Tuesday in either Kansas City or Toronto. Nobody really cares where, just that their season will continue.

MURPHY:  Enjoying the moment. (Getty)

MURPHY: Enjoying the moment. (Getty)

I wrote the other day how much I admired Murphy’s attitude, but said it was time he he took a bow after all the static he’s taken for his defense. He deserves this moment in the sun.

With Murphy’s unconscious streak comes the inevitable talk of whether the Mets will sign him long-term or to a qualifying offer. I’ve written it also, but on second thought, what does it matter?

Eventually, I’ll write it again. And, about bringing back Yoenis Cespedes and how he hurt his left shoulder and had to leave the game last night. Or, what’s going on with David Wright’s back. And, what workload the Mets’ starters might have next season. Or, what GM Sandy Alderson will do about rebuilding his bullpen.

There are a lot of things to review about this season, including whether Terry Collins will be named manager of the year. (He should). You guys know me, you know I’ll address them. But, at least for today I don’t want to hear them. I don’t care about next season.

This is a moment to be savored, to be cherished. It is a moment that prompted somebody online to write how he wished he was five-years-old again so he can grow up to be a Mets fan. How precious is that?

“This city deserves it,” said an exuberant Wright, who trusted Alderson and Jeff Wilpon, who promised him good times were within reach.

“This organization deserves it. The players deserve this. … I can’t describe the emotions that are going through me right now.”

The offseason news can wait a few more weeks. The topics will still be there; they aren’t going anywhere.

The last time the Mets were in the World Series was 2000. Before that, it was 1986. Before that, it was 1973 and 1969. Do you sense a trend here?

Wright said this team was a combination of the 1969 Miracle Mets and 1973 Tug McGraw, “Ya Gotta Believe,” team.

When Wright went to the playoffs in 2006, he thought it would be that way every year. However, he learned how fleeting a moment this can be. As Mets followers, we understand that.

We follow the Mets because we love that team. The reasons why, don’t matter. We just do. It is in our DNA.

However, despite the Mets’ young pitching, nothing is a given. Nothing. We don’t know about the future. None of us do.

So, let’s not worry about something beyond our control. Let’s enjoy this, as this is a rare and precious time.

It could be our best time.



Oct 09

Mets A Team To Embrace Destiny

Can the Mets beat Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke, two of the best pitchers in the National League in the first two games of the Division Series?

Hell yes. They can do it because they are throwing Jacob deGrom and Noah Syndergaard, who are also two of the best pitchers in the National League. They also have Matt Harvey going in Game 3.

DeGROM: It begins with him tonight.  (Getty)

DeGROM: It begins with him tonight. (Getty)

The Dodgers have been in the playoffs in recent years and made early exits, and they’ve done it with Kershaw. There’s nothing new about them that suggests this year will be any different.

The Mets on the other hand have been on a roller coaster ride this season to reach the playoffs for the first time since 2006. I’ve written it several times this summer – when I’m not tweaking Harvey (yeah, yeah, I know I get on him a bit) – that this can be a team of destiny.

Think about how many significant players who’ve been out at times because of injuries: David Wright, Lucas Duda, Travis d’Arnaud, Zack Wheeler, Josh Edgin, Jerry Blevins, Michael Cuddyer and Bobby Parnell.

All important players they couldn’t afford to lose, yet here we are, hours away from Game 1 of the NLDS.

How many playoff teams entered the season without a commitment to a shortstop? I can only think of one, and that’s the Mets. Yet, here we are. Wilmer Flores took to the position, was almost traded, and then captured our hearts with his tears.

The Mets lost their closer Jenrry Mejia to suspension, yet Jeurys Familia stepped in to tie a club record in saves. He could be the team’s MVP. That stuff doesn’t usually happen.

The Mets don’t have a traditional lefty specialist, yet they are finding a way.

This is a team that didn’t have a leadoff hitter, yet Curtis Granderson stepped in and produced to the point where he could be the Mets’ MVP, if not Familia. Championship teams always have that one player who expands his role, that for the Mets, that’s Granderson.

They lose Wright for nearly five months, yet in his first at-bat off the DL he hits a homer. You don’t call that storybook?

To get to the playoffs this year, the Mets needed to play even with the Nationals. I don’t want to hear that the Mets backed in because the Nationals choked. The Mets kicked the stuffing out of them to the point where the likely NL MVP, Bryce Harper, said he wants to win.

When the Mets were floundering in July, there was an infusion of new blood when Michael Conforto was called up, and the trades for Yoenis Cespedes, Kelly Johnson, Juan Uribe and Tyler Clippard.

There’s something special about this group that through the injuries and changing roles of players that it has persevered.

Special teams find a way to get it done despite the obstacles and that’s what this team has done.

So, to answer the first question, yes the Mets can beat Kershaw and Greinke. And, for that matter, they can beat anybody else, too.