Mar 13

Mets Wrap: Warthen Apologizes For Slur; Mets Beat Nationals; Matsuzaka Sharp

Pitching coach Dan Warthen apologized for a racial slur and received support from Daisuke Matsuzaka and his interpreter, Jeff Cutler.

Warthen approached Cutler in the clubhouse and apologized to Cutler, saying: “I’m sorry I called you a Chinaman yesterday.’’

Warthen said the statement was a joke, and Cutler said he was not offended. However, a reporter for the Wall Street Journal, a Chinese American from San Francisco heard the apology, and was put off by it, although not hearing the context of the original comment.

Warthen and GM Sandy Alderson apologized on behalf of the club.

Neither Matsuzaka nor Cutler vilified Warthen.

“Today I was just preparing for my game, so I just spoke to him about today’s lineup and what was going on during the game,’’ Matsuzaka said through Cutler. “… I think everyone makes mistakes, and Dan has already commented on it. I don’t want to dig deeper into it or try to add to what it is.’’

Said Cutler: “Dan has already commented on it. And Sandy has talked about it. I don’t really have anything else to add to it.’’

In addition:

* Matsuzaka started in the 7-5 victory over Washington and gave up one earned run and three hits over 3 2/3 innings. He struck out four and walked none to increase his grip as the projected fifth starter.

* Noah Syndergaard gave up three runs in 3.2 innings. He struck out five and acknowledged he would be sent to the minor leagues to start the season.

* Manager Terry Collins used Rafael Montero and Jacob deGrom in relief. They will additional looks this spring, but neither is expected to make the Opening Day roster in the pen.

* Ruben Tejada committed his third error in six exhibition games, and after going 0-for-3, is 1-for-15.

* Ike Davis (calf injuries) and Lucas Duda (left hamstring) took batting practice and grounders. Neither ran, but Collins is hoping they can be used this weekend in DH roles.

Mar 05

Mets Wrap: Lose Both Ends Of Split Squad Game; Mejia Said He’s Fine

The best news of an otherwise dismal day for the New York Mets is that Jenrry Mejia said he is pain free.

Mejia gave up one run in two innings in a game where the Mets were routed, 11-5, by the Washington Nationals at Viera, Fla.  The Mets also lost their Port St. Lucie game, 5-2 in 10 innings, to the Miami Marlins.

Mejia, in competition for the fifth-starter job, but with the possibility of working out of the bullpen, gave up an unearned run on one hit, two walks and three strikeouts in two innings.

Not in the box score was how his surgically-repaired elbow felt.

“That’s the most important thing – I feel better, I feel good right now,’’ Mejia told ESPN.com. “Everything is fine.’’

In addition:

* Things weren’t fine for reliever Cory Mazzoni, who was rocked for seven runs in one inning by the Nationals. Things might have been better for him had Wilmer Flores not missed a tag at second base on a throw from the outfield. The play might have opened the door, but Mazzoni still must find a way to get the outs needed.

* Also having a rough time was reliever Gonzalez Germen, who gave up three runs over 32 pitches in the loss to Miami.

* I don’t know why, but it appears the experiment with Flores at shortstop is over. Terry Collins wanted to get a look at him at shortstop, but with Ruben Tejada ailing and two games to choose from, Flores played second base. Makes no sense to me, unless the experiment is over, which is a bad call this early.

* Neither Tejada nor Ike Davis is expected to play tomorrow. Friday at the earliest.

 

Sep 12

Mets Wrap: Classless Frank Francisco Needs To Go

The New York Mets brought back Frank Francisco from oblivion this season because their bullpen was depleted, but also in the off chance somebody might be desperate enough to trade for him.

After his despicable display this afternoon at Citi Field, any team wanting him would not only be desperate, but stupid as well.

WERTH: Gets drilled by Francisco. (Getty)

WERTH: Gets drilled by Francisco. (Getty)

With the game in the balance in the eighth inning and behind 3-0 in the count, Francisco drilled Jayson Werth in the back after giving up back-to-back doubles to Denard Span and Ryan Zimmerman. It was obvious; Francisco was in trouble and wanted his pound of flesh.

Of course, Francisco later said it was unintentional and he was “obviously all over the place,’’ but the Nationals weren’t buying. Players know, and Werth took out Ruben Tejada with an aggressive slide that could have broken the shortstop’s ankle.

Werth, obviously, was sending his own message. The retiring Davey Johnson, who likely managed his last game in New York, told reporters after the 7-2 victory, “it’s a good thing we don’t play them again.’’

There’s no misunderstanding what that meant.

Teams remember, and Terry Collins should have done something to diffuse the situation – and perhaps any future clash – by immediately pulling Francisco. In doing so, Collins would have been telling the Nationals, “I understand Francisco is an idiot and I’m getting him out of here.’’

It should have been his last pitch with the Mets. Clearly, nobody would want Francisco now, and if Collins is about sending messages to his rookies about playing the game the right way, this would have been the perfect opportunity.

The Mets were upset with Francisco’s work ethic in his rehab, and this bush league act should not be tolerated, not if the Mets want to be considered a classy organization. It was a thuggish act by Francisco with no place in the game. I don’t care if they owe him money, get him out of here.

The Mets have lost 10 of their last 12 games, and what was once a chance at respectability is now an attempt to avoid 90 defeats. Today was their 81st loss. They are now a season-low 17 games below .500 with 17 remaining to play.

If there was a positive today, it was Aaron Harang’s quality start of giving up three runs in six innings. All three runs came on solo homers, but he walked one and struck out ten. However, those strikeouts will be enough to get Harang another start and perhaps an invitation to spring training.

Meanwhile, who knows who’ll be dumb enough to extend such an invitation to Francisco?

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Aug 01

Mets Wasting Matt Harvey; Giving Games Away

Why are the New York Mets even bothering with Matt Harvey‘s innings cap when they don’t even support him. I know they are trying, but 12 no-decisions? He has more no-decisions than total decisions. That’s incomprehensible.

HARVEY: Another strong effort thrown away. (AP)

HARVEY: Another strong effort thrown away. (AP)

Thursday was another frustrating example of wasting a Harvey start, and truth be told, he didn’t do himself any favors, either. He was in trouble in only one inning, but couldn’t escape. Roger Clemens once said there are two or three moments in a game when the starter must will himself out of an inning if he’s to win. What happened in Miami has happened before, and twice before against the Marlins, when Harvey couldn’t finish the deal.

Believe me, I’m not ripping Harvey, one of the Mets’ true bright spots, but just pointing out something in which he would agree with: When run support is weak, it is all left on the pitcher. By all standards Harvey is having a marvelous year, but has been betrayed by a sputtering offense and occasional defensive breakdown.

This road trip began with a rout in Washington, and the Mets on the verge of a doubleheader sweep of the Nationals until Daniel Murphy threw a ball away resulting in a disappointing split. The next day it was the offense’s inability to hit with runners in scoring position.

The Mets lost three of four in DC, when in reality they could have won three. Getting back to Miami, they could have left with a sweep.

It’s been that way all season for the Mets, who have losing records in one-run games, two-run games, extra-inning games, at home, and against the Nationals and Marlins. They’ve lost ten against the Fish, the worst team in the division.

For the most part, Harvey’s brilliance has overshadowed those records, that is until he’s involved in the game. With a little more support, and a little more of him shutting down an inning, he could have 14 victories by now. Perhaps more.

That’s why it has been frustrating with these Mets. Most national media had them pegged for 100 losses, but they have overachieved to making us believe .500, and possibly second place, is within reach. Hey, they could have jumped the Nationals or at least pulled even with them if you take away Murphy’s throw and add some hits.

Good teams win at home, win within the division, and win the close games. That they are in so many close games to begin with is a positive sign because the alternative is being blown away, as they frequently were last year in the second half.

I was joking about the innings cap, but to a point. If you’re going to limit him, then don’t waste what he gives you, and that’s exactly what the Mets are doing.

Jun 30

For Best Results Mets Need To Turn Wheeler Loose

After what happened Friday night, it was impressive how the New York Mets rebounded yesterday. While the baseball cliché is “there’s always a game tomorrow,’’ there can be a carry-over. Now, let’s see if there is one today in Zack Wheeler’s Flushing debut.

WHEELER: Turn him loose.

WHEELER: Turn him loose.

In his first two starts, Wheeler is 1-0 with a 3.18 ERA. The Mets took him off the hook for what would have been a loss last Tuesday in Chicago, but they aren’t able to erase his wildness.

Foolishly, the Mets mandated Wheeler throw more breaking pitches against the White Sox. Unfortunately, he was tipping his pitches when he did.

Wheeler’s money pitch is his fastball. First things first: He should learn command of that pitch on the corners before going to his slider and curveball.

There are many – Wheeler included – who believe he’s being force-fed the major leagues. But he’s here now, so the Mets should put him in the best position to win. With their offense suspect and bullpen shaky at times, that means letting Wheeler go with his fastball.

There will be pressure on Wheeler this afternoon against the Nationals, but he’ll have third baseman David Wright available as a calming influence.

“It’s going to be one of the most enjoyable, memorable times for anybody making their home debut, especially as highly touted as Zack,’’ Wright told reporters at Citi Field yesterday. “Best advice is just enjoy it because it only happens once. Don’t go out and try to do too much. Don’t try to go out and impress. Do what’s got you to this point, and he obviously knows what he’s doing.’’

And, what got Wheeler here was his fastball.

NEWS NOT GOOD ON GEE: Dillon Gee gave the Mets six strong innings yesterday, but he did it with flexor tendinitis in his arm making the disabled list a possibility.

As most pitchers do, Gee said he’s fine.

“It actually felt pretty good lately,’’ Gee said after beating the Nationals. 5-1. “Hasn’t really been an issue.’’

Over his past six starts, Gee as limited opponents to one run in four of them.

METS MATTERS: One of the best pick-ups by the Mets has been outfielder Marlon Byrd, who is second on the team with 40 RBI. Ideally, you’d like to keep him in the hope the Mets will make a run toward respectability, but realistically he could prove valuable to a contender. … Terry Collins said Ruben Tejada has to beat out Omar Quintanilla when he comes off the disabled list. Quintanilla has played very well, and yesterday broke an 0-for-17 slide with two hits. … Jon Niese, on the disabled list with a partially torn rotator cuff, is scheduled for a follow-up MRI July 4, which could determine the need for surgery.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos