Jun 05

Mets Chat Room: Perez DL’s for Niese.

Game #56 vs. Marlins

Well, what do you know? The Mets found something wrong with Oliver Perez. A MRI revealed patella tendonitis of his right knee.

So, Perez was placed on the disabled list which conveniently allows the Mets room to recall Jon Niese to make this afternoon’s start against the Florida Marlins.

Niese strained his surgically-repaired hamstring, May 16, in a loss at Florida. Niese (1-2, 4.79) is 0-2 a 5.63 ERA in two starts lifetime against the Marlins.

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May 07

May 7.10: Should the Mets sit Pelfrey tonight?

Are the Mets pushing it with Mike Pelfrey?

After complaining of stiffness in his throwing shoulder following his last start – he was ripped in Philly last Saturday – Pelfrey underwent an MRI and threw an abbreviated bullpen session this week.

“I’ll be able to make it,’’ Pelfrey said of tonight’s start against San Francisco at Citi Field.

Pelfrey said he pushed it in his bullpen session and that he felt fine. Then again, what else did you expect him to say?

Even so, an argument can be made for pushing Pelfrey back a start, much like the Yankees are doing with Andy Pettitte.

It’s still early and it isn’t as if one start is a make-or-break deal on the season. Why push him? Give him the extra rest and let him throw a full bullpen to make sure.

It seems the Mets are taking an unnecessary risk. When it comes to a pitcher’s arm, it is better to always land on caution. What good is tonight if he misses his next two or three or more starts?

May 05

May 5.10: Chat Room, Game #28 at Reds: Getaway day and resting Pelfrey.

The Mets behind Jon Niese will attempt to win the rubber game of their series at Cincinnati this afternoon and go home 3-3 on the road trip. A let down of sorts after their 9-1 homestand, but considering what happened in Philly, I’ll take it.

Niese is coming off a superb start last Friday in Philadelphia, prompting one anonymous Phillie to say he’s better than any pitcher the Phillies have “not named Halladay.”

To me, the key story of the day is how the Mets are handling Mike Pelfrey’s tight shoulder. Pelfrey was hammered in his last start, and afterward complained of stiffness in his shoulder. An MRI Monday was negative, but even so the Mets bagged his normal throw day yesterday and today he had a light abbreviated bullpen session.

Pitching coach Dan Warthen said the decision to cancel his normal bullpen was to not force the issue, but also said Pelfrey is good to go this weekend against San Francisco.

I say, why bother?

There’s reason enough to be concerned so shouldn’t the prudent thing be to have him skip his start to be sure he’s sound. We’re talking a game in May. Isn’t it better to miss one game now rather than four or five later should he go on the disabled list for a prolonged time?

When it comes to a pitcher’s arm, I always anticipate the worse and believe it is better to be cautious now rather than regretful later. They don’t need Pelfrey as much this weekend as they do later this season.

R.A. Dickey is pitching well for Triple-A Buffalo and could be brought up for an emergency start.

Here’s today’s line-up for the Mets:

Angel Pagan, CF
Alex Cora, 2B
Jose Reyes, SS
Jason Bay, LF
David Wright, 3B
Ike Davis, 1B
Gary Matthews, RF
Henry Blanco, C
Jon Niese, LP

Aug 25

Santana done for year ….

The news wasn’t good for Johan Santana. He was examined today by Dr. David Altchek at the Hospital For Special Surgery and will undergo minor elbow surgery that will end his season. Santana will have bone chips removed from his left elbow. The Mets said he is expected to be ready for spring training.

Several of Santana’s teammates said Monday they expected him to undergo surgery, and manager Jerry Manuel said he was “terribly concerned.” When Santana went to be examined today they weren’t expecting good news.

SANTANA: Done for season.

SANTANA: Done for season.


In fact, Mike Pelfrey said, “I don’t think anyone expects good news.”

Santana is as tough as they come. In the final weekend of the season last year, Santana pitched a three-hit shutout on a left knee that required surgery. For him to opt out of a start, he had to be really hurting.

Once again, the injury raised questions of how the Mets handle injuries. Manuel said: “He has not been throwing between starts for quite awhile. I would say since before the All-Star break. He has been pitching with this problem, but not with the level of discomfort he has now.”

A tip off was his decline in velocity, but the Mets, based on Santana saying he could pitch, kept sending him out there. Maybe they should have said no, scratched him earlier and done a MRI a month ago. It is a question that will be asked.

In response, GM Omar Minaya said in a conference call: “Up until his last start, it was something that he was able to pitch with. After his last start, he said this to us, and we are, as you say, wisely shutting him down.”

Santana had a 7-2 record and 1.77 ERA in his first 10 starts, averaging 6 2/3 innings start and 11.73 strikeouts and 7.09 hits per nine innings. Santana, who historically is a dominant second-half pitcher, still lasted as long in his subsequent starts, but was 6-7 with a 4.02 ERA. He averaged 5.36 strikeouts and 9.30 hits per nine innings.

Santana, 30, is in the second year of a six-year, $137.5 million contract.

Aug 24

Santana out tomorrow

The Mets have scratched Johan Santana from tomorrow’s start at Florida with discomfort in his left elbow. He’ll undergo a MRI and the Mets will have to consider shutting him down for the remainder of the season. With the Mets 16.5 games behind the Phillies, what’s the point?

Jerry Manuel said he didn’t whether Santana could pitch again this season.

“That wouldn’t be my decision, that’s a medical decision,” Manuel said.

The Mets certainly don’t want to risk further injury, but in shutting him down they won’t know the severity of the injury until spring training.

Santana, in his second season with the Mets, is 13-9 with a 3.13 ERA. He has pitched 166 2/3 innings in 25 starts.
For those of you who are asking, what else could go wrong? Well, here’s your answer.