Apr 24

Mike Pelfrey On DL; Could Be Done For Year

The Mets just announced they placed Mike Pelfrey on the DL after a MRI showed swelling in his elbow (retroactive to April 22). Taking his place on the roster is left-handed pitcher Robert Carson from Double-A Binghamton.

ESPN reported Pelfrey has a partial tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his right elbow and could undergo season-ending surgery.

Pelfrey is expected to get a second opinion. Pelfrey was rocked in his first start, but pitched well in his last two.

Carson, 23, is 0-0 with a 3.18 ERA in five games at Binghamton.

Mar 14

Wright update; Mets lose again.

First it was going to be a game or two, then at the end of this week, then next week and now David Wright hopes to be ready by Opening Day. Knowing these are the Mets, why didn’t they just throw Opening Day out there from the outset.

Why did it take them so long to send him to New York for this latest diagnosis of an abdominal tear? Why does this stuff always seem to happen with the Mets? Wright is easily the Mets’ most valuable commodity, so why do they treat this with such ambivalence?

I’m glad to see Wright playing this smart and taking his time, but wonder why the Mets were slow on the MRI.

***

The NBA trade deadline is tomorrow and everybody is wondering what will become of Dwight Howard. Reminds me of Jose Reyes when we all knew he wasn’t coming back. Would have hoped Orlando would have learned from the Denver Nuggets, who fleeced the Knicks for Carmelo Anthony, who has been nothing but a selfish headache for New York. In hindsight, the Mets knew Reyes wasn’t coming back and should have gotten what they could.

First Howard is leaving, then he’s staying. Make up your mind. In absence of something definitive, the Magic have to deal him and get what they can.

By the way, did you hear Reyes’ response the other day when he said he had “put the Mets behind him?” He did that when he left that last game after the bunt.

***

Dillon Gee pitched well in today’s loss to Detroit, save a homer to Prince Fielder. But, that’s going to happen. Terry Collins is still having difficulty putting together his patchwork bullpen.

 

 

 

Mar 07

Santana feeling fine; today’s lineup.

On the morning after, Johan Santana said he felt good and would throw a bullpen session tomorrow. Each day is another hurdle, and it isn’t a stretch to say tomorrow’s pen might be more important than yesterday’s start.

The Mets are already planning April’s rotation. There are two versions of it, one with Santana and one without. The one with Santana will be such that each start comes with an extra day of rest. With the off-days in April, that shouldn’t be difficult.

Santana threw mostly in the 87-88 range, but with more strengthening could boost that slightly. Important, however, was he maintained roughly a 10 mph. difference between his fastball and change-up.

* Reliever Pedro Beato has stiffness in his shoulder and will undergo a MRI.

* Outfielder Scott Hairston will be out for at least two weeks with a strained oblique muscle (he took a cortisone injection this week). It is very possible Hairston could open the season on the disabled list. As of now, Kirk Nieuwenhuis does not appear to be an option as a bench player.

Here’s today’s lineup against the Marlins:

Ruben Tejada, ss

Daniel Murphy, 2b

Justin Turner, 3b

Lucas Duda, rf

Josh Satin, 1b

Josh Thole, dh

Cesar Puello, lf

Mike Nickeas, c

Matt den Dekker, cf

Jon Niese, lhp

Note: Jose Reyes isn’t expected to play today, but could face his former team tomorrow.

 

Jul 03

Reyes injury a source for concern.

Timing is everything, and all of a sudden this isn’t a good time for the Mets. After a sparkling road trip to Texas and Detroit, the Mets have dropped three straight and fallen 7.5 games off the wild-card pace.

REYES: Will have MRI today.

Is this the start of the July slide some feared that propel the Mets into a fire sale?

They hope to avoid being swept by the Yankees today, then head to the West Coast for series against the Dodgers and Giants, where they usually don’t play well. You might recall it was this trip last season – which featured an ailing Jose Reyes – that derailed their slim wild card hopes.

And, it could be happening again this year, with Reyes pulling up lame with a hamstring injury yesterday. Reyes and muscle pulls haven’t gotten along, first at the beginning of his career and the last two seasons.

We won’t know the severity of Reyes’ injury until a MRI today, but what it does do is give us a glimpse into what the Mets have feared and one of their concerns in offering him a long-term deal in the neighborhood of six or seven years.

Reyes sustained hamstring issues at the beginning of his career and muscle pulls the past two seasons, very alarming for a player who makes his living with his legs.

History tells us Reyes won’t last the duration of his next contract without an injury. Common sense also tells us if his current injury is severe and lands him on the disabled list for several weeks and his immediate health is an issue, it might make it more difficult to deal, especially if the Mets don’t offer a negotiating window to the other team.

Reyes says he’s not concerned, but that’s putting on a brave face. How can he not be worried?

 

Jun 22

Surgery should come sooner than later for Davis.

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: Ike Davis is expected back in two weeks.

That was mid-May.

DAVIS: News not good.

The news isn’t good for Davis, whom GM Sandy Alderson said could require season-ending surgery after a MRI today revealed cartilage damage along with the bone bruise.

Davis had been wearing a protective boot, and the hope is the blood flow in his leg will improve enough to allow him to start running in three weeks. If he can’t, then he’ll undergo surgery.

Davis told ESPN: “Obviously surgery is an athlete’s nightmare, but I’ve had one surgery on my wrist and it worked out really well and it came back better than I was before.

“If it’s going to get me on the field again, obviously that’s something we have to do. But, obviously, we’re going to get a second opinion and see if everything coincides with everything everyone says, and hopefully in three weeks I’m starting to run again.’’

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