Apr 28

Mets To Make Alamo Stand In DC

The setting for this series should be in San Antonio, home of the Alamo. That’s appropriate for the Mets, as they are about to make perhaps their last stand for the 2017 season.

The Mets enter this three-game series losers of six straight and 10 of their last 11 games; they are in last place 7.5 games behind.

DeGROM: Makes huge start tonight. (AP)

DeGROM: Makes huge start tonight. (AP)

Jose Reyes said it best about this series, saying, “we’ll see what we’re made of … we can’t too deep into the standings.’’

Should the Mets be swept by the Nationals as they were last weekend at Citi Field, they will limp into May 10.5 behind.

And, let us not forget their roster on the disabled list that could expand by Yoenis Cespedes and Noah Syndergaard.

Cespedes had an MRI and the Mets put him on the disabled list today. The Mets hope Syndergaard will be available to start Sunday, but hoping isn’t much of a strategy.

The Mets are in a two-week long hitting funk and it will be hard-pressed for them to escape against Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg.

The Mets start Jacob deGrom tonight in what arguably could be call one of the five most important starts of his career. Raw, but promising Zack Wheeler goes Saturday and Sunday is up in the air. In anticipation of putting Syndergaard on the disabled list, the Mets recalled lefty Sean Gilmartin today.

Without the long ball, the Mets’ chances to win get longer. Twice during their losing stretch, manager Terry Collins said they needed to manufacture runs.

That lack of situational hitting has been a staple during GM Sandy Alderson’s tenure.

Alderson wanted to bury Michael Conforto on the bench, but he’s been forced to play because of injuries and the overall ineptness of the offense.

He’ll leadoff tonight. He’s a line drive hitter with decent speed, but don’t look for him to steal a game on the bases.

Here’s tonight’s batting order:

Conforto – LF

Asdrubal Cabrera – SS

Jay Bruce – RF

Neil Walker – 2B

Curtis Granderson – CF

Reyes – 3B

T.J. Rivera – 1B

Travis d’Arnaud – C

deGrom – RHP

 

Apr 28

Today’s Question: What Next For Mets?

The Mets arrived in Washington last night 7.5 games behind the Nationals. They didn’t get that far behind them last season until July 29.

question-1969017__340First up will be the MRI results of Yoenis Cespedes‘ left hamstring that will reveal what we already know, it is serious and he’ll go on the disabled list. Tonight’s outfield will feature Michael Conforto, Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson.

They are hurting for offense, so perhaps they might pull the trigger and bring up Amed Rosario. Ironically, it would be at a time when Jose Reyes seems to be finding his swing.

Reyes homered Thursday and after said energy was needed and the Mets can’t afford to fall too deep in the standings. If the Mets are swept this weekend, they’ll be double-digit numbers behind heading into May and Panic City.

They could also bring up Sean Gilmartin, which would mean the disabled list for Noah Syndergaard.

Finally, and most importantly, is will they find the energy manager Terry Collins said they are lacking?

In each of the last two years, the Mets overcame long stretches of dismal hitting and sluggish play to reach the playoffs. The Mets listened to Collins then, but will his message sink in this time?

 

 

 

 

Sep 02

Elbow Issue To Sideline DeGrom

Jacob deGrom will miss his next start, Tuesday in Cincinnati, because of inflammation in his right elbow. The report comes less than 24 hours after manager Terry Collins pleaded ignorance to deGrom calling for trainer Ray Ramirez to follow him to the clubhouse after Thursday’s start.

DeGrom underwent a MRI that showed inflammation but no structural damage.

On Thursday, deGrom gave up three runs on six hits and four walks in five innings. In his two previous starts he had given up 13 runs on 25 hits, and Collins, believing the problem was fatigue, opted to give him an extra three days of rest.

After the game, deGrom said he felt out of sync, but everything was fine.

It isn’t.

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Jul 13

Mets Must Overhaul Pitching Protocols

 

UPDATED

The only one of the Mets starters not currently waving a health red flag is the one whose roots are not in the organization – Bartolo Colon. To be fair, Colon had health issues earlier in his career and a PED history, but he’s clean now and save a ball hit off his thumb has been fine.

Colon, at 43, has been a source of stability on the mound since joining the Mets, but his greatest contribution might be the suggestion to Noah Syndergaard, whose 23-year-old arm suddenly lost its steam, to back off his between-starts throwing.

HARVEY: Symbolizes Mets' pitching problems. (Getty)

HARVEY: Symbolizes Mets’ pitching problems. (Getty)

When Syndergaard told Bob Klapisch, one the most knowledgeable baseball writers I know, his arm felt “like there are parachutes attached to it,”  there was the image of swimming against the current.

Syndergaard is pitching through a bone spur in his elbow. Syndergaard experienced a sudden five-mph., drop off his fastball in his last start against the Nationals, similar to turning an oscillating fan from high to medium. Every pitch was a change-up.

Matt Harvey, who at 27, is out for the season following shoulder surgery; the second time in four years the knife cut him out of the rotation. Jacob deGrom was given a chance to be on the National League All-Star team but told manager Terry Collins he was too tired. The word he used was “beat.”

He’s only 28.

Then there’s Steven Matz. He had Tommy John surgery before he was 25, and like Syndergaard is pitching with a painful bone spur.

Finally, there’s Zack Wheeler, who at 26, also experienced Tommy John surgery. He was supposed to come off the disabled list in late June and send Colon to the bullpen. Then it was July, then after the All-Star break. Now, it is mid-August.

I’m waiting for the announcement he will not pitch this year.

Realistically, nobody expected all these guys to blossom into 20-game winners at once. However, also realistically, nobody expected them all to break down all at once, which is closer to happening than one might think.

Is this a coincidence or something deeper?

I would love to see the Mets get back to the World Series. However, I would rather they not make the playoffs, even have a losing season, if it meant seeing each of these guys healthy. For that to happen, the Mets need a serious and comprehensive plan. And remember, wishing is not a plan.

The first step is to recognize how they’ve handled things in the past. The second step is to recognize it hasn’t worked.

I’ve been on the record and will not back off saying they mishandled Harvey from the outset of his arm problems in 2013. It should be noted Harvey back then, and today contributes to his own problems.

Syndergaard won’t pitch until the Mets are in Chicago next week. They’ll ease him back in the rotation, which is a wise decision. Not so wise is their inexplicable decision not to schedule a new MRI. The Mets are going on a previous set taken several weeks before the Washington meltdown.

Just stupid.

GM Sandy Alderson said of Syndergaard and Matz their bone spurs is a matter of pain tolerance. More than once they’ve said the pitchers – the keys to the Mets’ future – couldn’t risk further injury.

Wrong answer.

There are no guarantees when it comes to injuries. The only guarantee is if you continually do something wrong and it doesn’t work, it won’t get better.

The Mets have the possibility to have a great pitching staff, but that’s all it is now – potential. It will remain potential unless the Mets do a complete overhaul in how they handle their pitchers.

From throwing between starts, to pitch counts, to days off, to dealing with pain and discomfort, to a myriad of other things, there must be a complete change. There should be uniformity in policy and procedure from the rookie league to Citi Field.

I don’t know if these Mets will develop into a staff for the ages or fizzle out like the Oakland staff under Billy Martin. Both could happen.

Something is wrong and priority one for the Mets is to find out what it is and fix it.

I don’t care about what happens this year, it’s probably too late, anyway. I care about what happens in the years to come.

 

Jul 08

Three Mets’ Storylines: More Injuries

What was that line in Bull Durham? “Sometimes you win. Sometimes you lose. And, sometimes it rains.” However, on this night for the Mets, it didn’t rain long or hard enough.

The Mets lost 3-1 Friday to the Washington Nationals, but that was just the game. On a day the Mets lost Matt Harvey to season-ending shoulder surgery they lost a lot more during the game.

SYNDERGAARD: When will we see him again? (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: When will we see him again? (AP)

I covered Harvey earlier today, so the top three Mets storylines tonight are: 1) Noah Syndergaard leaving with an arm injury, 2) Yoenis Cespedes leaving with a strained quad muscle, and 3) Jose Reyes’ reluctance to run.

SYNDERGAARD LEAVES WITH ARM INJURY: Syndergaard, who has been bothered by a bone spur in his elbow, and whom manager Terry Collins would pitch in the All-Star Game, left in the fifth inning with what the Mets called “arm fatigue.”

Collins told reporters: “He just said his arm went dead. It got tired on him. … “He tells me there’s nothing wrong. He’s just tired.”

Collins said Syndergaard will not pitch in the All-Star Game. He also said “as of now,’’ there’s no correlation between this and the bone spur.

His velocity was down and he winced with his last pitch. Doesn’t a wince denote pain? If he couldn’t feel anything in his arm, that’s not a dead arm.

“I didn’t have anything on pitches,” Syndergaard told reporters. “I knew something wasn’t right.”

Twice already this season Syndergaard complained of discomfort in his pitching elbow and underwent a MRI. He said he didn’t think a third MRI is necessary.

Wanna bet?

CESPEDES HAS QUAD INJURY: The Mets’ All-Star outfielder left after three innings with a strained right quad while chasing Daniel Murphy’s double.

Cespedes leaped to catch the carom off the wall and landed awkwardly. What the good folks at SNY didn’t say was he didn’t play the ball properly and was too close to the wall.

Collins said he might have to do without him for a couple of games, which should also put him out of the All-Star Game.

“`I’m running out of things to say and we’re running out of bodies,” said Collins, who indicated the Mets will play shorthanded for the rest of the series.

REYES DOESN’T RUN: The Mets had runners on the corners with no outs, with Reyes on first. Or, should I say, anchored on first?

He didn’t try to steal to get the tying run into scoring position. He didn’t run to stay out of the inning-ending double play.

SNY’s analysis ranged from the wet turf, to being rusty to not being confident, yet, to run. None are good explanations.

Reyes is here for his speed and provide a spark. If he’s rusty, what’s the point? The day before he was activated Collins said Reyes wasn’t ready, and several days prior to that the player said he didn’t want to come back until he was 100 percent.

Evidently he is not, despite the homer Thursday. Evidently, if the manager and player said Reyes wasn’t ready, then did management force this move just to sell a few tickets against the Marlins?