Nov 18

Alderson Defends Moving In Fences

We knew the New York Mets were moving in the fences. This afternoon we learned by how much. Common sense dictates moving in the fences benefits the hitters more than the pitchers, but speaking like any politician you’ve ever heard, GM Sandy Alderson says that’s not the case.

“These modifications are a refinement of previous changes made to the Citi Field fences and continue to be fair to both pitchers and hitters,’’ Alderson said. “A lot of analysis went into this decision. We believe these modifications will increase the number of home runs without adversely affecting our pitchers.’’

Of course, that’s impossible.

In its first three seasons, Citi Field measured 415 feet at its deepest point in right-center. In the last three years the wall was 390 feet. It will now be 380 feet.

Had the Mets played with these dimensions last season, they would have hit an additional 17 home runs while the opposition would have hit 10 more.

It is impossible to project those numbers because it doesn’t into account: 1) wind conditions, and 2) the game situation, which would dictate how hitters are pitched.

Making such a declaration means every fly ball hit last year at Citi Field would have to be analyzed, and quite frankly I don’t believe that was done.

Alderson said the goals in moving in the fences were two-fold: 1) making the more Mets more competitive at home, and 2) increasing offense, which he says increases the entertainment value of the Citi Field experience.

Then again, if the altered fences make the Mets more competitive, it stands to reason the opponents would also benefit. And, it’s not guaranteed the Mets will score most of those additional runs.

The Mets were out-homered by the opposition 71-59 last year at Citi Field. That’s 12 more. Now, if the Mets would have hit 17 more, that’s only a net of five more home runs. That’s less than one a month.

The bottom line is there’s no guarantee the both teams would benefit equally to the fences being moved in. However, one can only surmise if the opposition was 12 homers better than the Mets last season, they enter this year 12 homers better.

Also not being taken into consideration is that the Mets are building their team on young pitching. Why make things harder for them?

Oct 11

Moving Fences In Not A Good Move

If we were playing one of those games where you match a word to an action, you might choose “embarrassing,’’ for the Mets’ decision to change the dimensions for the third time since Citi Field opened in 2009.

Three times in six years is a clear indication this team doesn’t have a grasp as to its desired identity.

When Citi Field opened, the Mets wanted to build on pitching, defense and speed. Even so, their first signing was Jason Bay, who turned into an $80 million bust.

When David Wright was injured, Bay floundered and Ike Davis failed to hit management moved in the fences. Bay and Davis are gone, Wright is still injured and last year’s signing Curtis Granderson came up with a mediocre year, they are moving the fences in again.

That seems counterproductive considering the Mets finally have some good, young pitching, and there’s the speedy Juan Lagares in center field. The Mets don’t have significant power outside of Lucas Duda, but there’s potential with Travis d’Arnaud.

The Mets have some speed, but traditionally lack patience and ability to hit in the clutch. Those two attributes are more important than pure power.

However, this doesn’t mean home runs can’t be hit in Citi Field. There were 130 homers hit there last season, of which 59 were hit by the Mets and 71 by the opposition.

Assuming a healthy Wright, a full season from Duda, and improvement from Granderson, d’Arnaud and Wilmer Flores, it is reasonable to expect that gap to close. And, the Mets are expecting Matt Harvey’s return and the continued development from Zack Wheeler and Jacob deGrom.

The opposition also gets to hit, so whatever advantage gained by the Mets’ offense is neutralized by what it takes from their pitching. Moving in the fences is designed to jack up the home run numbers, but in the end that’s not what gets a team into October.

Nov 11

Beltran willing to move to right

One of Sandy Alderson’s objectives is to convince Carlos Beltran to accept a move to right field and it looks as if that might happen.

In a conference call Thursday, Beltran said he would be open to moving to right field and waiving his no-trade clause.

BELTRAN: Open to move and trade

“I still feel that I can play center field,’’ Beltran said. “But, if the organization has different things in mind, then we have to talk about it.’’

Beltran wants to finish his career with the Mets, but is aware the club would like to shed his $18.5 million salary.

“If the organization is looking at different options, I have to be aware,’’ Beltran said. “So if a situation comes between them and us, we’re going to handle it in a very professional way.’’

The talking could start Saturday when Alderson travels to Puerto Rico for Beltran’s fundraiser for the construction of his baseball academy.

Continue reading

Aug 26

Mets Chat Room; gotta get Reyes moving.

If the Mets are to go on this miracle run, they’ll need to get Jose Reyes again, beginning tonight with Florida. The Mets are at their best when he gets on and makes things happen.

Game #127 vs. Marlins

He’s cooled off since his 15-for-31 road trip Houston and Pittsburgh, going 0-for-10 in the first two games of the Marlins’ series.

He was 0-for-5 last night and grounded out with the bases loaded to end the game.

“I tried to get a base hit or walk, something to tie the game or win the game,’’ Reyes said. “He made a quality pitch on me and got me out. I saw it good, but I wasn’t able to put my best swing on that ball.’’

There’s been discussions about picking up Reyes’ option and negotiate an extension. There’s also been talks in the media if the best thing to do would be to trade him for a package of prospects.

Personally, I’d keep Reyes. You’re not going to find anybody that will produce like him.

NOTE: Folks I have to work tonight and won’t be able to monitor the board. I hope you’ll pop in with your comments.

Jun 16

Maine might need more time.

MAINE: Not ready yet.

Jerry Manuel is saying John Maine might need another rehab start after Friday night, which probably isn’t a bad idea considering he was clocked at 88 mph. in his last outing.

When Maine comes back he would most likely come back as a starter because Manuel fears his shoulder might not be able to handle the up-and-down nature of the bullpen.

Several years ago the Mets once toyed with the idea of moving Maine to the bullpen but resisted.

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Word is Carlos Beltran is running with a limp, which still delays the timetable on his return.

Once Beltran moves from extended spring training games to a minor league rehab assignment the clock will start and the Mets would have 20 days to activate him.

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NOTES: Luis Castillo is taking ground balls in Port St. Lucie and might be activated for the Yankees series at the Stadium this weekend. … With the Mets facing righthanded pitching until Sunday look for Chris Carter to remain as the DH.