Sep 15

Mr Met: Entertaining and Delighting Fans Since 1963

mr_met

Tell the unknowing that a guy with a giant baseball head, cartoonish nose, and goofy wide smile is one of the most beloved characters in sports history and you’re bound to get a reaction of disbelief.

But such a claim holds true for Mr. Met, the long time mascot of the New York Mets.

The simple truth is that Mr. Met is sure to make you smile whether you’re a diehard Mets fan, a casual fan, follow baseball for wagering opportunities, or are just human with a charitable nature.

As an early pioneer of team mascots, the humble beginnings of the Mr. Met character date back a full decade or more before most MLB teams adopted costumed characters to amuse fans. While it’s quite expected these days to see mascots engaging with fans at the ballpark, they all owe a debt to the groundbreaking Mr. Met.

He originally existed in animated form when he graced the cover of the Mets programs, scorecards, and yearbooks during the 1963 season. Several artists, including acclaimed comic book illustrator Al Avison, contributed to the concept and design of Mr. Met.

The team moved stadiums from the Polo Grounds to Shea Stadium in 1964, an occasion enhanced by the debut of Mr. Met as a live mascot.

Mr. Met graced Mets games and promotional material until 1976, when he was phased out of appearance. Presumably, he retired and was playing golf in Florida, although this has never been confirmed.

Passionate fan appeal sparked the Mets to reintroduce Mr. Met in 1994, and he has been rightfully entertaining the masses at Shea Stadium and Citi Field ever since.

In addition to his unwavering support for the Mets (we wish we had that kind of patience!), Mr. Met is a devoted family man, often bringing his lovely wife Mrs. Met along to the games. During their early days, the couple would occasionally have their three little Mets children in tow.

While he has always worn the hat of his favorite baseball team, Mr. Met has worn many figurative hats throughout his career. Off the field, he has been a cheerleader, a fundraiser, a marketer, and even a hired wedding guest.

Jun 19

Today’s Question: Is Going Against Kershaw A Reverse Lock For Mets?

Could the Mets showdown against the Dodgers and ace Clayton Kershaw be an example of a Reverse Lock?

KERSHAW: Smart money on him. (MLB.com)

KERSHAW: Smart money on him. (MLB.com)

A Reverse Lock is when all the stars are aligned for something to be played out one way but goes in the opposite direction.

All the stars are lined up for the Dodgers tonight. New York is struggling and Kershaw is 8-1 with a 1.49 ERA in 13 career starts against the Mets, whose hitters are batting .177 with a .245 on-base percentage against him.

In addition, Yoenis Cespedes is 0-for-9 lifetime and Lucas Duda is 1-for-11. The Mets’ leading hitter against Kershaw is Wilmer Flores at 3-for-9. Jay Bruce is 5-for-20 with two homers.

Feeling good about things?

Starting for the Mets is Zack Wheeler, who is making his first career start against the Dodgers. Wheeler is winless in his last four starts and coming off the worst start of his career, giving up eight runs in 1.2 innings last week against the Cubs.

So, if you’re into betting, why wouldn’t you place a buck or two on Kershaw tonight? That’s where all the smart money will be, making a Reverse Lock possible.

 

 

Mar 29

Familia Gets 15 Games; Case Raises Questions

I would not have thought it, but MLB came down on Jeurys Familia today, and you could say the Mets came away with their first victory of the season. While most – including myself – predicted he’d be suspended for 30 games on a domestic incident. Instead, MLB tagged him for just 15 games.

FAMILIA: Gets 15 games. (AP)

FAMILIA: Gets 15 games. (AP)

Familia was arrested Oct. 31 after his wife, Bianca Rivas, told police he was drunk and violent. The police report said she had signs of injury, however, she would not press charges.

A statement released by MLB read: “The evidence reviewed by my office does not support a determination that Mr. Familia physically assaulted his wife, or threatened her or others with physical force or harm, on October 31, 2016. Nevertheless, I have concluded that Mr. Familia’s overall conduct that night was inappropriate, violated the Policy, and warrants discipline.”

MLB would not say how its investigation differed from that of the police, or what factors it used to reach its decision, but there had to be something because his suspension was the shortest since creating a domestic-violence policy on 2015: Mets infielder Jose Reyes got 52 games for spousal abuse and Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman got 30 games, and his incident involved allegedly choking his girlfriend and shooting a gun.

Familia, who has 99 saves as the Mets’ closer, said in a statement:

“Today, I accepted a 15-game suspension from Major League Baseball resulting from my inappropriate behavior on October 31, 2016. With all that has been written and discussed regarding this matter, it is important that it be known that I never physically touched, harmed or threatened my wife that evening.

“I did, however, act in an unacceptable manner and am terribly disappointed in myself. I am alone to blame for the problems of that evening.

“My wife and I cooperated fully with Major League Baseball’s investigation, and I’ve taken meaningful steps to assure that nothing like this will ever happen again. I have learned from this experience, and have grown as a husband, a father, and a man.

“I apologize to the Mets’ organization, my teammates, and all my fans. I look forward to rejoining the Mets and being part of another World Series run. Out of respect for my teammates and my family, I will have no further comment.”

There is so much more left to digest and wonder about Familia’s case.

Only he and Bianca truly know what happened that night and she won’t say or do anything to implicate her husband, so we are only left to speculate and wonder about the future. Hopefully, this will be a wake-up call for Familia. And hopefully, there won’t be a next time for Bianca.

As far as MLB judging players on their off-field behavior and possible incidents that have brushes with the law we have to understand there is a high degree of public relations with professional sports and that will never change. But, to what degree should MLB be involved has long been up for debate. That won’t change, either.

 

 

Feb 20

Yanks’ Betances-Levine Feud Has Mets’ Remifications

I preface this with an apology for not posting recently. Many of you know I was severely injured in an accident several years ago and have had mobility problems since, including having to teach myself how to walk again. I had back surgery at the end of last week and haven’t posted the past few days because of sleeping most of the weekend. It’s one of those things I’ll have to deal with.

REED:  Don't limit him. (AP)

REED: Don’t limit him. (AP)

However, I have kept tabs on our team and MLB, and something occurred over the weekend I find pertinent to the Mets. That was Yankees president Randy Levine’s touchdown spike after the Dellin Betances arbitration hearing.

The two were $2 million apart and why they couldn’t meet in the middle is beyond me. It does illustrate how the Mets are better than most in handling the arbitration process. Rarely do the Mets engage in the spitting contest of a hearing where the player has to listen to the team trash him, then expects him to play as if nothing happened.

Levine said Betances couldn’t get closer-like bucks because he isn’t a closer, and he won’t get many opportunities this year because the Yankees have Aroldis Chapman. So, how does this impact the Mets?

While awaiting news on Jeurys Familia‘s suspension, the Mets don’t appear concerned because they have Addison Reed. But, if the Mets were paying attention to last year’s playoffs, they should recall Andrew Miller and how the Indians used him during game-in-the-balance moments that weren’t in the ninth inning.

Too often, the pivotal moment of a game is in the seventh or eighth inning, which is when Cleveland went with Miller. Since Reed is presumably the Mets’ best reliever, why can’t they use him in that situation instead of waiting until the ninth, when more often than not he’ll enter into a clean game to get three outs?

What’s wrong with using Reed when they really need him, instead of watching Hansel Robles kick away the game?

Baseball is held hostage by such statistics as saves and righty-lefty match-ups rather than letting players just play. For a recent reminder consider Miller and Daniel Murphy. For a long time the Mets didn’t want Murphy bat against left-handers. However, the Washington Nationals had no problem letting him bat against lefties.

There’s just too much over thinking in baseball and I’m afraid the Mets will fall into that trap with Reed until Familia returns.

 

 

 

Feb 14

No Love For Familia From MLB

Mets closer Jeurys Familia isn’t commenting on his domestic violence case which is understandable. However, neither is Major League Baseball, which isn’t.

Familia greeted reporters in Port Lucie with a clipped: “My lawyer’s advice is that I don’t speak about anything related to my case.”

FAMILIA: Waiting on suspension verdict. (AP)

FAMILIA: Waiting on suspension verdict. (AP)

Major League Baseball is still investigating Familia’s Oct. 31 arrest following a dispute with his wife, Bianca Rivas in Fort Lee, N.J. There was immediate speculation he would receive up to a 30-game suspension, which has persisted even though the case was dismissed by the New Jersey legal system.

However, Major League Baseball – as it did in the case involving Jose Reyes – doesn’t always follow the lead of the courts and acts on its own.

Commissioner Rod Manfred expects a resolution by the end of spring training but would not guarantee a ruling, which is ridiculous when you think about it.

Why not?

Unless MLB’s investigation is any more intense or thorough than the Fort Lee police, what’s the point in delaying this? MLB, because it is understandably sensitive about domestic violence issues, will have to issue some kind of suspension.

What’s the delay? There have already been suspensions levied against Reyes and Aroldis Chapman, so we know MLB won’t let Familia skate.

In fairness to Familia and the Mets – who need to construct a bullpen – this should have been done before pitchers and catchers reported.

What’s the purpose of a delay?