Nov 16

Sandy Alderson Said Mets Will Spend; No Promises Made

How much the New York Mets will spend on free agents this winter is undetermined, but what we can ascertain is it will not be enough to satisfy everybody. This much we know is general manager Sandy Alderson will not just throw money at a player to placate the grumbling fan base.

There’s an old saying if a baseball manager or general manager acted solely to please the fans in the stands he’ll soon be sitting with them, and Alderson will not act out of emotion.

“No fan is probably ever going to be satisfied with what his or her team is spending on players. It’s kind of too bad that the measure of commitment, the measure of loyalty to the fan base, is measured in dollar signs,’’ Alderson told ESPN today.

“That be as it may, we’re going to spend more money this year than we’ve spent in recent years, just in terms of what we have to spend. You know, last year we only spent about $5 million on free agents. So this is going to be a new day. We have it to spend. We have to spend it wisely. That’s what we’re trying to do.’’

We’ve heard that before from Alderson, which puts us in an “I’ll believe it when I see it,’’ position.

Alderson promised nothing this afternoon in his ESPN interview. Essentially, the said they’ll do more than last winter, which was basically Shaun Marcum.

We all want the Mets to not only compete, but win. Barring a miracle it won’t happen. You might point to the “Miracle Mets’’ of 1969, but remember that team had a core of a solid pitching staff highlighted by Hall of Famer Tom Seaver. Plus, it was a different game back then.

Even if the Mets were to start writing checks there’s no guarantee they’ll win. Look how much the Yankees have spent recently and look where it got them.

What has it gotten the Dodgers the past two years? The Nationals? The Tigers? The Phillies? The Angels?

The bottom line is there’s not one free agent out there – not Jacoby Ellsbury, not Shin-Soo Choo – or trading for David Price – that will guarantee the Mets the World Series.

Hell, even if the Mets do it traditionally right through their farm system there are no assurances. Hell, Matt Harvey’s elbow injury should have taught us that lesson.

However, gradual building, which the Mets tell us they are doing, does provide the Mets odds.

I believe the Mets will make some moves this winter, and the recent inactivity doesn’t mean they won’t do anything.

The Mets won 74 games last year, and if they get two innings eaters in the back end of their rotation, improve at shortstop, build depth in their bullpen and add an outfield bat – in that order – they should have a better team.

Those additions, while low key, along with a full season from David Wright, and improvement from Jon Niese and Zack Wheeler, the Mets should improve enough to win at least one more game a month, which would put them at .500.

And, this is regardless of whether they trade Ike Davis, Lucas Duda or both.

If that happens and Harvey comes back healthy in 2015, plus a few more holes are patched, then they can make a run at the postseason.

Hell, even if that does occur, there’s no givens. There never is in baseball.

Sep 10

What Is The Reason Why You Still Watch The Mets?

Once Zack Lutz became a New York Mets trivia answer, what was the reason to watch Monday night? What is the reason to watch, to listen, to read about the Mets anymore this season? Is the big attraction now to avoid sinking past the season-low 15 games below .500?

If you’re a reader of this, or any other blog, you’re a Mets fan and watch because that’s what you do. I’ve never liked the expression “die hard fan,’’ because it means you eventually give up and die. I also don’t like “long suffering fan,’’ because why would you do anything that makes you suffer? You might as well say “put my hand on a hot stove’’ fan.

BELIEVING

                                                                             BELIEVING

You  might be frustrated and disgusted by watching the Mets lose 9-0 to the Nationals, but it is far better than not having any Mets to watch at all.

October has to be the worst month because there’s baseball, but baseball without the Mets. At least in November there’s the start of the free-agent season, highlighted by the Winter Meetings, which is winter’s World Series.

January? You can see spring training from there, and February, regardless of the wind chill, gives us our first warming taste of summer.

It’s not like a greater force mandated you become a Mets’ fan. In some families you might be born into it, but eventually it becomes your choice to root for the Mets.

You rooted in the beginning when they lost 120 games. You rooted throughout the sixties until you were rewarded by 1969, the year of the Miracle Mets and when man first walked on the moon.

As a Mets’ fan you endured long periods of frustration and lousy ball, but once a decade you were rewarded by the postseason, in 1973, 1986, 1999, 2000 and 2006.

In a commercial David Wright said his greatest thrill was playing October baseball in New York, “that there’s nothing like it.’’

That’s the ultimate reason we watch our team, but there’s a greater, more intimate reason why you’re fascinated, enthralled or even consumed by the Mets. There was one incident, one moment, that made you into a Mets’ fan, win or lose, and lately it has been mostly losing.

If you’re willing to share, I’d be interested to know what was the defining moment, that despite a fifth straight losing season, makes you hang on for news about Bobby Parnell’s and Matt Harvey’s looming surgeries … about Ike Davis‘ situation … about the outfield for next season.

It is why we’d like to see just one more time before the leaves change Wright’s compact swing rip a ball into the gap and him running into second with a stand-up double.

I know that’s why he’s yearning for one more game in the Summer of 2013.

What are the reasons why you still hang on to the summer?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Apr 11

Mets No Longer Lovable Losers

Well, you didn’t expect perfection, did you?

POLO GROUNDS: Where it began for the Mets.

The Mets gained the reputation as “Lovable Losers” in their infancy, which began 50 years ago today with a decisive loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. Last night was also decisive, but there was nothing lovable about it as the Mets started the night with news their often-injured third baseman, David Wright, had a fractured right pinkie and is expected to be placed on the disabled list.

Then, I suppose in a page taken from the original Mets, Dillon Gee gave up a game-opening home run to Ian Desmond. We knew the Mets would eventually lose, but defeat was certain and ugly, containing butchered plays by Daniel Murphy and Lucas Duda, two defensive liabilities to begin with, but not with the Marvelous Marv flair.

Gee was roughed up and the offense disappeared and their first defeat of the season was in the books. There will be others, but defeat in 2012 will be different than defeat in 1962.

Back then, New York was happy to have National League baseball back in the city and embraced the rag-tag group of veteran rejects managed by circus barker Casey Stengel. Defeat was often and came in various forms and with the Stengel proclamation: “Can’t anybody here play this game?”

Well, at one time, they did. At one time, Gil Hodges, Duke Snider and Richie Ashburn could really play. However, 50 years ago, they represented memories in flannels.

Today’s Mets, while undermanned, have a core of young and talented players, with more on the way up. Had the original Mets taken to start with youth before veterans, who knows how the history of the franchise would have changed?

Perhaps, we might have had the Miracle Mets before 1969. Then again, the karma would have been altered. Like much about baseball, there’s fun and beauty in speculation.

The Mets celebrate 50 years this season, and we all have our memories and special moments. Mine is different than yours, but they are all special. I don’t know how this year will wind up, but it will be special in its own right because it will contain a new set of memories.

It began with a sprint out of the gate with four exciting and well-played victories, but sputtered last night with bad pitching, spotty defense and no hitting, just like it was 50 years ago.

But, it’s not 1962 anymore. The Mets have a new stadium and aren’t playing in the rundown Polo Grounds. Those Mets weren’t expected to be good, or even compete. Today’s Mets must compete, and in New York, that means winning.

 

Feb 11

Was F-Mart The LH Bat We Needed?

Soon after the Nationals snatched up left-handed hitting outfielder Rick Ankiel, the Mets pulled the plug on their quest to land a left-handed bat for the team.

Ankiel had been high on their list and some reports even circulated that Sandy Alderson may have offered the one-time pitching phenom a minor league deal. Anyway, that was then and this now, and it’s looking more and more that either Mike Baxter (.213 MLB, .277 minors) or Adam Loewen (.176 MLB, .267 minors) will be the Mets 5th outfielder.

It certainly gives one pause to think about Fernando Martinez one last time…

I can’t deny that Martinez is looking like a bust at this point, but wouldn’t it be a better idea to roll the dice on a young, cost-controlled player who at least has some potential instead of spending more money on an older player who could easily post the same poor numbers?

I think the Mets should have given Martinez at least one more season.  There is the slight chance that something finally clicks for Martinez and he ends up being a contributor. In the Miracle Mets world you might have a Nelson Cruz-type.  Not necessarily the same level of production, but similar in that Fernandez could emerge as a late-bloomer and become worthy of a starting role.  He certainly has the raw talent.  In a worst-case scenario, Martinez continues to under perform as a part-time player.  So what?  What do the Mets have to lose in 2012?  Or even 2013 for that matter?  ~  Craig Williams, Rant Sports

I really cant argue with that logic. Fair or Foul?

Jul 02

Today in Mets’ History: Boswell, Garrett pace win over Cards.

Yes, there was Tom Seaver and Jerry Koosman. Cleon Jones and Tommie Agee had good years. The 1969 Miracle Mets weren’t void of marquee players.

However, they were also a team comprised of role players. Donn Clendenon was a late season addition. Ron Swoboda, Ed Kranepool and Al Weis had their moments.

On this day in 1969, Ken Boswell and Wayne Garrett – two guys probably not recognizable if they chose to take the subway to Shea Stadium – contributed in a 6-4, 14-inning victory at St. Louis.

Boswell singled in a run in the 14th against Ron Willis and Garrett drew a bases-loaded walk.  They combined to go 6-for-13 with five RBI and three runs scored.

BOX SCORE

Koosman started and worked 7.2 innings and Tug McGraw pitched six innings in relief to pick up the win.