Oct 14

Collins Said 2017 Could Be Last Season

It was interesting to hear Terry Collins say this could be his final season managing the Mets. Most managers – especially those with a career .500 record (925-925) – don’t usually dictate their departure terms.

COLLINS: Says 2017 might be his last. (AP)

COLLINS: Says 2017 might be his last. (AP)

I don’t like it because it screams lame-duck status and if things sour as they did this year, you’ll hear loud rumblings about making a chance.

There are things I didn’t like about Collins, but many decisions were forced on him by GM Sandy Alderson. Considering the injuries and lengthy slumps by key players, the Mets were fortunate to reach the postseason. What the Mets should do is give him an extension to avoid lame-duck status.

“I just need to re-evaluate at the end of this coming year what’s going on, where I am, how I’m feeling,” Collins told ESPN. “I’ve always said a lot of it will be dictated by how I’m feeling. This was a tough year.”

Collins, baseball’s oldest manager at 67, said this was a grueling season, so draining he was hospitalized in Milwaukee. The issues bothering Collins most are travel and MLB’s often inane scheduling. (The Mets playing a day game on Labor Day in Cincinnati after a night game the previous day at Citi Field was demanding.)

“It takes a toll on everybody,” Collins said. “You talk to the players. If you noticed, that [Labor Day game] was the day we gave everybody off because they were stinking beat.

“This travel is hard, especially with the late-night scheduling that is prevalent throughout baseball. There are so many night games where you’re traveling after the game and getting into towns at 3 or 4 o’clock in the morning.”

Next year might not be much different than this season. The Mets enter the season with questions at catcher, first base, second base and on the mound with Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz coming off surgery.

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Aug 28

Three Mets’ Storylines: More Injuries, But DL Should Be Avoided

There’s never a good time to be injured, but for the Mets to have three players go down the same day, now is as good a time as any for them to go day-by-day with Asdrubal Cabrera, Neil Walker and Yoenis Cespedes. With the rosters to be expanded Sept. 1, the Mets have three days for manager Terry Collins to juggle his lineup without having to utilize the disabled list.

GSELLMAN: Gives Mets six solid. (AP)

GSELLMAN: Gives Mets six solid. (AP)

Walker (back) and Cespedes (right quad) woke up sore and did not start Sunday’s 5-1 loss to the Phillies, while Cabrera (left knee) was hurt in a first-inning collision. Each player missed time earlier this season with a similar injury.

Were they rushed back too soon? That’s a possibility, but all have played well – actually they are the Mets’ three hottest hitters – since coming back, so that might be an oversimplification.

“This is something I’ve dealt with before,” Walker said of his back. “Sometimes it takes a couple of days; sometimes it takes a little longer. This one is taking a longer.”

If a player goes on the disabled list now, he still has to sit the full 15 days. That’s part of the Mets’ reasoning for starting Steven Matz Thursday, Sept. 1, rather than the day before.

The Mets can get by with Wilmer Flores, Ty Kelly or Kelly Johnson in place of Cabrera and Walker, and Alejandro De Aza in place of Cespedes for the next three days.

The temptation Collins must resist is thinking they all must play in the upcoming series against the Marlins, especially with the Mets forced to having pitching unknowns Rafael Montero (Monday), Seth Lugo (Tuesday) and a pitcher to be determined (perhaps Sean Gilmartin, who is currently on the 25-man roster) going Wednesday. The Mets could also move up Bartolo Colon and pitch him on short rest.

These injuries coupled with the lack of production from the offense, was today’s primary storyline. The others were sticking with starter Robert Gsellman too long and the wild card race.

PUSH ENVELOPE WITH STARTER: The Mets couldn’t have asked for more from Gsellman than they got for six innings in his first career start, which was one run.

Except they did and ran him out for the seventh. The Phillies’ first three hitters singled, and Collins went to Hansel Robles, who has been dreadful for the past month. By the time Collins replaced Robles, three runs were in and the opportunity for the Mets to sweep was gone.

With every game vital for the Mets, they would be better off using Robles in mop-up situations because it is clear he’s not getting the job done in his present role. In 13 innings this month he has given up 14 runs (all earned) on 15 hits and ten walks for a 0-1 record with a 9.69 ERA. Dreadful is as good a word as any.

The slide can be pinpointed to Aug. 3 when the Yankees’ Mark Teixeira forced Robles’ meltdown by mocking him while on second base. That night Robles gave up three runs on three hits and two walks in two-thirds of an inning.

THE RACE: The Mets caught a break with St. Louis and the Marlins losing, but Pittsburgh won in Milwaukee.

The Mets trail Miami by one game with the Marlins in Monday to start a four-game series. We’ve heard this before, but this is a very important series.

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Aug 03

Pet Peeve: Out Of Control Umpires

NOTE:  I’d like to introduce something new – Pet Peeve – where I respond to something in baseball, not necessarily pertaining to the Mets.

An umpire’s position merits respect much like a cop on the beat, but at the same time, shouldn’t they have to earn it?

They earn it by being consistent. By being fair. By keeping their emotions in check. By having patience. By not losing control.

The episode the other night in Philadelphia with plate umpire Bob Davidson is the perfect example of what the players complain about, and that is being a bully. Upset over a fan reportedly yelling at him – over and over –  “you suck,” Davidson walked over the stands next to the dugout and had the fan ejected from the stadium.

It wasn’t the first time he had a fan tossed. He did it several years ago at a Cardinals-Brewers game in Milwaukee. He had a field day that afternoon, bouncing players, managers and a fan.

What happened In Philly was arrogance to the highest degree. Not only did he act outside his jurisdiction, but what he did underscored one of the things players hate about umpires: That they have rabbit ears.

Heckling is part of the game, and if Davidson is that sensitive to where he can’t take it he should retire.

Were the fans sitting next to this guy angry enough to where they called security? Not to anything I’ve read. Davidson said the Philadelphia fans cheered him, but that’s hard to believe.

It is up to the Phillies to maintain their crowds. They should monitor the crowd to ensure things are under control; nobody is threatened or uncomfortable; and that everybody is having a good time.

Apparently, Davidson wasn’t, and that’s just too bad.

Davidson’s actions could have provoked something ugly. What if this guy broke free as he was being escorted and charged the field? What if he was part of a group?

What if? What if?

What Davidson should have done if he was so concerned about the women who might be offended – that was his claim – was to have security tell the guy to tone it down. Davidson didn’t do this. Nor did he tell the fan himself to shut up.

Davidson exceeded his authority and should be reprimanded. I don’t care how. Fine him. Suspend him. Do both.

It’s bad enough many of these umpires fly solo and insist on their own strike zones, but to police the crowd, to be cop, judge and jury goes over the line.

Get Davidson out of here.

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Aug 01

Mets Get Bruce From Reds; Raises Questions

Updated to include quotes from Sandy Alderson and Terry Collins.

You can still find Brandon Nimmo with the Mets. Nimmo had been traded to Cincinnati for Jay Bruce, but that changed when he reportedly failed his physical and had to be replaced by second base prospect Dilson Herrera. Minor league lefty prospect Max Wotell was also included in the trade.

BRUCE: Running to Mets. (AP)

  BRUCE: Running to Mets. (AP)

The Mets added Herrera after the Reds found something they didn’t like with Nimmo’s physical. Nimmo had a foot injury earlier this year.

Mets GM Sandy Alderson would not confirm it was Nimmo who had the medical issue, but that’s not hard to figure out since he was pulled and Herrera was added.

The 29-year-old Bruce is expected to offer the punch that has been severely lacking, hitting .265 with 25 homers and a league-leading 80 RBI, and perhaps most importantly, a .360 average with RISP. Bruce has been on the Mets’ radar for over a year when they offered Zack Wheeler last July before landing Yoenis Cespedes.

“We haven’t had time to talk about playing time will be broken down,” Alderson said. “He’ll provide a big presence in the middle of the lineup. … One player could have a significant impact. Somebody like Jay Bruce can be a catalyst.”

Q: What is Bruce’s contractual status?

A: Bruce is in the final months of a six-year, $51 million contract, which includes a $13 million option (or $1 million buyout) for 2017. Bruce is making $12.5 million this season. Alderson said the club option was essential.

“We would not have done the deal without the extra year of control,” Alderson said. “We would not have done the deal as a rental.”

Specifically, this gives the Mets a safety net should Cespedes opt out and leave after this season.

Q: Where will Bruce play?

A: With Cespedes insisting on playing left field, Bruce could go to right field with Curtis Granderson moving to center.

Q: How does the deal impact Cespedes and Michael Conforto?

A: If there is a time to put Cespedes (strained right quad) on the disabled list it is now (actually, it should have been three weeks ago). Having Bruce gives the Mets the flexibility of placing Cespedes on the disabled list now, which is preferable to risking an injury and losing him in September. What Bruce does is offer the Mets a safety net should Cespedes opt out after this season.

As for Conforto, he’ll stay up here if Cespedes goes on the DL. However, there’s a strong chance they’ll send him back to the minors and bring him up again in September unless there’s an injury before then.

Q: What about the long-term future with Granderson?

A: It’s all fluid now as Granderson has one more year on his contract and the Mets can choose not to bring back Bruce for 2017.

Q: Does it matter that even with Bruce the Mets don’t have a conventional outfield?

A: Not in the least, simply because the Mets don’t have a conventional outfield now. Bruce will report to the Mets tomorrow. Beginning Wednesday, the Mets will have five games in American League parks (two with the Yankees and three in Detroit), where they can buy some time with Cespedes.

Unbelievably, Collins said the Mets hope Cespedes might be able to play center field by the end of the week.

Q: What is the fallout with Herrera?

A: The sticking point in getting Lucroy from the Brewers was them not wanting to give up Herrera. This could enhance their chances of keeping Neil Walker, who can opt out if he wants after the season. Of course, that could mean giving him more money. Part of the reason why Alderson let Daniel Murphy walk was in part because of Herrera. Alderson said the Mets have some infield depth for next year with Wilmer Flores and Jose Reyes.

Q: Anything else?

A: Right at the deadline, the Mets reaquired Jon Niese from Pittsburgh for lefty reliever Antonio Bastardo. Niese will be used primarily out of the bullpen – “I didn’t forget the job he did last year [in relief],” Collins said – but could be slotted in if another starter needed a day of rest.

Jul 25

Suggesting A New Batting Order For Listless Mets’ Offense

Seventh? Can you believe it? Michael Conforto was in the starting lineup for Monday’s game – that was rained out – but hitting seventh in the order.

After a successful stint in the minors that culminated in two hits Sunday in Miami, that’s not where he should be in the order. Manager Terry Collins should leave Conforto in center, have him bat third and just leave him alone.

CONFORTO: Keep him third. (Getty)

CONFORTO: Keep him third. (Getty)

Conforto fizzled in April, got pull happy and saw his average drop from a season-high .365 on April 30 to a season-low .222 when he was sent down after four hitless games, June 21-24.

Conforto was told to concentrate on using the entire field and that’s been his mindset since coming back up.

“Just getting back to the kind of hitter that I feel like I am and use the whole field, take what the pitcher gives me,” Conforto told reporters in Miami about his hitting approach. “It’s really stuff we were working on up there. When you go down there, you get a chance to take a breath and really look at what’s going on and work on some things. It was a positive for me to go down there and work on some stuff.”

The Mets’ lineup has been dormant for much of the season, and part of the reason has been an inconsistent batting order.

Here’s what I suggest to offer stability:

Jose Reyes, 3B: He’s off to a good start since coming back and the only speed threat in the order.

Asdrubal Cabrera, 2B: He’s been terrible with RISP, so why not hit him in a place where there isn’t many runners in that position? Besides, Cabrera has been successful batting second.

Conforto, CF: He shouldn’t be here if he doesn’t play, and the best thing is to play him where he’s expected to end up. No more moving him around or pinch-hitting for him against right-handers.

Yoenis Cespedes, LF: The Mets aren’t going to budge on this – Cespedes will play left. But, he’s been the best power bat so hit him cleanup.

Curtis Granderson, RF: Batting him fifth would sandwich Cespedes against two left-handers.

James Loney, 1B: He’s been a terrific pick up and done it both in the field and at the plate. I’d also hit Wilmer Flores sixth when he plays, and once again, he should be in a rotation with the other infielders.

Travis d’Arnaud, C: Of course, this is predicated on him still being here. Should they get Jonathan Lucroy from Milwaukee, I’d bat him sixth behind Granderson and drop Loney down a notch.

Neil Walker, 2B: Slumps don’t get much deeper than the one Walker is currently riding. Pitchers could work around him to get to the pitcher. In the end, if Walker stays patient, this could help snap him out of a slump.

Pitcher’s spot: Ninth.