Jun 08

More Injuries Sack Mets Prior To Subway Series

The Mets received a triple dose of bad news prior to first pitch of their interleague series against the Yankees. Noah Syndergaard won’t start; Jeurys Familia went on the DL; and Yoenis Cespedes probably won’t play.

Syndergaard was scratched from Sunday’s start with swelling in his right index finger and will be replaced by Seth Lugo. Syndergaard last pitched May 25 at Milwaukee

Familia went on the DL with a sore right shoulder retroactive to June 7. Familia has 14 saves in 18 opportunities with a 2.48 ERA, but has been hit hard lately, giving up four runs in the past seven innings.

Jacob Rhame took Familia’s spot on the roster.

The news hits the Mets hard as it removes Lugo and Familia from the bullpen before they face a team that is raking, having won eight of its last ten games.

Assuming the Mets have a save opportunity, Robert Gsellman seems the likely candidate to replace Familia. Then, if the Mets need a couple of innings from a reliever, where will manager Mickey Callaway go without having Lugo available?

Presumably, Anthony Swarzak could take Lugo’s spot if the Mets need a couple of innings.

As far Cespedes is concerned, I didn’t expect him to be ready this weekend.

He’ll go a minor league rehab assignment tonight. He could rest Saturday and possibly play in another rehab game Sunday.

Jun 05

Injury Updates On Syndergaard And Cespedes

The Mets received encouraging news today regarding Noah Syndergaard, and are hopeful about Yoenis Cespedes. Mets pitching coach Dave Eiland said barring a setback Syndergaard should be in line to start Sunday night’s game against the Yankees.

Syndergaard went on the disabled list with a strained ligament in his right index finger after a May 25 start in Milwaukee.

“As long as it doesn’t flare up in the next 24 hours, he should be fine,” Eiland said.

As far as Cespedes goes, he continues to thumb his nose at manager Mickey Callaway’s notion of accountability as he again refused to talk to the media after taking batting against Syndergaard.

The often-injured Cespedes, who missed 81 games last season, went on the disabled list May 16 with a mild strain of his right hip flexor.

Callaway said the Mets hope to have Cespedes run the bases and shag flies in the outfield prior to Wednesday afternoon’s game, “then we’ll go from there.”

Callaway wouldn’t say when Cespedes could return.

I was against Cespedes getting a four-year, $110-million contract for a myriad of reasons, including his injury history; failure to hustle at times; his moodiness [blowing off the media falls into this category]; and penchant for doing things his way.

As far as I’m concerned, the money would have been better spent elsewhere and the Mets don’t need his attitude.

Credit WOR’s Howie Rose for calling Cespedes’ refusal to talk as “silly,’’ and SNY’s Keith Hernandez for saying it was wrong and “that doesn’t wash with me.’’

On a positive note, Todd Frazier was activated from the disabled list after missing 24 games with a strained left hamstring and reliever Anthony Swarzak after missing two months with a strained left oblique.

“I guess I needed that time off,’’ said Frazier. “I’ve played through pain. This was one of those areas (hamstring) where you really can’t do that.’’

To make room on the roster, the Mets optioned pitcher Gerson Bautista to Triple-A Las Vegas and designated left-hander Buddy Baumann for assignment.

May 27

Pitching Lets Down Mets In Lost Weekend

Pitching was supposed to carry the Mets as far as they’d go this season. Right now, after a blistering start, it has taken them one game over .500 as they head into Atlanta for the start of a four-game series against the no-fluke Braves.

The Mets’ pitching was horrible in losing three of four over the weekend in Milwaukee, with both the starters and bullpen combining to give up 29 games in the series.

The highlight of the weekend was Steven Matz giving up no runs in six innings, but threw 94 pitches in that span. Noah Syndergaard, again, showed he can’t hold runners on base as two of the stolen bases against him scored. Jason Vargas encored a solid start with a sinker Saturday, and Zack Wheeler was so-so today.

The bullpen was awful giving up 17 runs.

Making matters worse heading south is AJ Ramos (shoulder tightness) could land on the disabled list and Wilmer Flores returned to New York to have his sore back examined.

I hate to say it, but if the Mets leave Atlanta less than .500, then never get there again this year.

 

 

Apr 14

Mets’ Harvey Continues To Struggle

Another Matt Harvey start, another five innings. By all accounts, Harvey has recovered from thoracic outlet surgery. The radar gun registered a high of 95 mph., so velocity is not an issue. Going back to his last nine starts in 2017, Harvey has not worked past the fifth inning in 12 straight starts, dating back to May 28 of last season when he threw six innings in a win at Pittsburgh.

HARVEY: Still struggling. (AP)

HARVEY: Still struggling. (AP)

Harvey vowed this season would be different, and during spring training said: “It’s a completely new year, like I said. My mechanics are completely different, my arm is completely different.”

Unfortunately, the results have been largely the same. Just four times in 19 starts last year did Harvey pitch into the sixth inning or later. Last season, Harvey averaged just under 20 pitches per inning. This year, he’s averaging just under 18 pitches.

That translates to not enough innings pitched and another four innings logged by the bullpen. Tonight, he gave up four runs on eight hits, including two homers, in a 5-1 loss to Milwaukee to snap the Mets’ nine-game winning streak.

I suppose you can blame the cold weather. That’s a contributing factor, but not the entire explanation.

“He has good stuff,” manager Mickey Callaway said. “The strikeouts are there. He didn’t go after it the way I would have liked. He couldn’t get it going. I didn’t see the confidence that he’s had in the past.”

To his credit, Harvey made no excuses. He didn’t blame the weather, lack of support from his offense or lack of luck, all of which he has done in the past.

“Not very good,” was how Harvey assessed his outing. “I have to be better. This loss was on me. It is frustrating. I have to take my 24 hours and be pissed about it, then move on.

“Keeping the bullpen out of it is something I have to do. I would rather it be two innings at the end of the game and not four. All and all, I have to be better.”

Oct 02

How About Collins Overseeing Mets’ Minor League System?

GM Sandy Alderson said Terry Collins is best suited to work in player development. If that is the case, and Alderson is telling the truth that he believes Collins has a lot to offer and he wants to continue working with him, then there is one role for him, and that is to oversee the minor league system with the goal of implementing a “Mets Way.’’

Both Alderson and Collins suggested a need for such a program in recent weeks. Collins did in a roundabout way several weeks ago when commenting about Amed Rosario’s habit of tapping his glove with the ball before throwing to first. That habit cost the Mets a game and Collins wondered why it wasn’t addressed in Las Vegas.

Alderson more conceded the need for such an instructor when he noted several of the Mets’ rookies came to New York with a multitude of bad habits.

Rosario’s habit and Dominic Smith’s brain cramps are just two of the most prevalent. There are others, beginning with pitchers’ inability to throw strikes, and including hitters’ plate discipline, atrocious base running and defensive fundamentals, such as hitting the cutoff man.

Situational hitting and improving on-base percentage also must be improved.

The idea is to teach, beginning with the rookie leagues the same things are expected from the major leaguers.

That way there are no surprises.

However, for this to work Alderson must first implement organizational philosophies on offense and pitching. The pitchers have to be taught to throw inside, the way Rafael Montero was when he was on his hot streak.

Too many of the Mets’ hitters are preoccupied with hitting home runs. Sure, home runs are great, but consider this, the Mets tied Milwaukee for the NL lead with 224 homers, but neither are in the playoffs.