Jan 19

Mets’ Farm Team Cyclones To Host Lame Promotion

I don’t know with any certainty the truth in the Manti Te’o hoax. Only he does. I am not thrilled ESPN supposedly interviewed him, but there is no video. How does a network make that concession.

Let us give him the benefit of doubt for a moment and Te’o is a victim and was duped. Then that makes the Mets’ Single-A Brooklyn Cyclones’ promotion lame on so many levels. It would be capitalizing on someone’s misfortune. But, if Te’o were in on it, then why would they want to associate themselves with such a sick thing?

The Cyclones announced June 21 will be Fictitious Friday and with Sidd Finch taking on Roy Hobbs and the New York Knights. The team also said the Beatles will perform a pre-game concert. There will also be a petting zoo for the kiddies, with a unicorn, Minotaur and mermaid.

Just one contrived thing after another. Not so much funny and clever as it is forced. You can’t force humor.

In explaining the promotion, Cyclones GM Steve Cohen said: “Everywhere you look, there seems to be another story about an athlete that was covering up something.

“People don’t know who, or what, to believe any more. That got us thinking, we should have a night where our fans don’t have to worry about what’s real and what’s not, we’ll just tell them everything planned for that night is a hoax.’’

The event seems forced and by the time June rolls around, the Te’o thing could be forgotten. But, what if it’s true? What if he were duped? That would be capitalizing on someone’s misfortune which is extraordinarily weak.

It will come off like a bombed skit on Saturday Night Live. A clever idea gone sour.

By the way, if the Cyclones really wanted to make a point about a hoax, they should have a steroid night with character athletes playing Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, Mark McGwire and Roger Clemens. And, if they did that, somebody will be sure to ask about Mike Piazza, only that hits too close to home.

This idea is weak from the start and the sooner it is abandoned the better.

Jan 13

Mets Matters: Team Considering Brian Wilson And Honoring Piazza

ESPN reported former Giants closer Brian Wilson worked out for Mets GM Sandy Alderson in California.

The 30-year-old Wilson underwent Tommy John surgery last season and could be a decent risk on two fronts: 1) he’s young enough to where he could replace Frank Francisco after 2013, and 2) if he rebounds the Mets could get something for him at the July 31 trade deadline.

Wilson is far from ready, so if the Mets bite it would be a gamble. Wilson says he’ll be ready by Opening Day. Wilson made $8.5 million last year from the Giants.

Whether Wilson replaced Francisco this year or next is irrelevant. If he’s healthy he could aid a currently weak bullpen.

METS COULD HONOR PIAZZA: I voted for Mike Piazza for Cooperstown, so I have no problem with him going into the Mets’ Hall of Fame.

Reportedly, the team is also considering retiring Piazza’s No. 31. I don’t have a problem with that, either, but there are other worthy candidates the club should think about first, notably Keith Hernandez, Darryl Strawberry, Gary Carter and Dwight Gooden.

All were significant members of the team’s most dominant era.

Jan 12

Piazza Denies Steroids In Book

Some writers claim they voted NO on Mike Piazza for the Hall of Fame did so because his book, “Long Shot,” isn’t to be released until Feb. 12, after the induction announcement. Coincidence or deliberate timing?

You can make an argument either way, but not surprisingly Piazza denies any steroid use. Of course, nobody would realistically expect him to.

It’s pretty disheartening to hear how objective journalists painted Piazza with the same broad brush applied to Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens. Vote your conscience, but the evidence against Piazza is circumstantial at best. Pimples are not a conclusive argument.

 

Jan 08

I Voted For Piazza

I can’t remember when I’ve anticipated the Hall of Fame results like I do this year. I would be stunned if the noted cheaters on the ballot – Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy Sosa – get in, but honestly I am surprised to read how many writers included them.

Some say they voted on production, yet omitted baseball’s greatest hitting catcher in Mike Piazza. I do not understand this thinking.

I did not vote for Bonds, Clemens or Sosa, but I did vote for Piazza. The evidence against Bonds, Clemens and Sosa is evident, as it is against Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro.

That is not the case with Piazza, who never failed a drug test, did not appear on the Mitchell Report, and was never accused by a colleague on the record. There has been innuendo against Piazza from a several writers citing acne on his back. This is circumstantial evidence, and shaky at best.

If Piazza does not get in, and it is later discovered he cheated, then I will change my vote in the future. But, there currently is none, and I cast my ballot for him without hesitation.

Jun 19

R.A. Dickey And Roger Clemens Interesting Contrast

Earlier in the day there was Roger Clemens, one of the most talented pitchers of his era, standing on the courthouse steps after being acquitted of all charges in his perjury/steroids trial.

DICKEY: The best about sports.

Later, there was R.A. Dickey, whose salary this year probably isn’t as much as Clemens spent on his legal defense team, mow down the Baltimore Orioles with his second straight one-hit shutout.

It was a contrast in talent vs. perseverance, arrogance vs. humility, and likability.

Dickey will never have the career Clemens had, and I’m talking the pre-cheating Clemens. Just because he was acquitted doesn’t mean he didn’t use steroids. This was a sham of a trial with the government as inept in its case as the Orioles hitters were last night.

When it comes to steroid trials, the government is so useless it couldn’t have gotten a conviction with a signed confession.

The issue surrounding steroids is credibility. The public wants, deserves and needs to know what it is seeing is real. With Clemens it did not, because whatever happened behind closed doors there still is the belief he cheated.

With Dickey, whose arm forced him to go with an improvisational pitch, we know we are seeing honest effort and grit, and with it genuine joy when he succeeds.

We are done with Clemens, and have been for a long time, even before he went after Mike Piazza’s head with a fastball and later a sawed off bat in a fit of steroid rage. With Dickey, we can’t get enough of him. He is a great story of what sports should be about.

He makes us happy to watch, not disgusted.