Nov 08

Adding To Bullpen Will Cost Mets

Even without the top-shelf names of Wade Davis and Greg Holland, the list of relievers the Mets are reportedly considering for their bullpen is pretty intriguing – and potentially expensive.

Addison Reed ($7.75 million in 2017), Luke Gregerson ($6.25 million), Bryan Shaw ($4.9 million), Mike Minor ($4 million), Brandon Kintzler ($2.9 million) and Matt Albers ($1.4 million) are sure command sizeable raises, but even more when you consider the Mets already have three relievers already at the back end of their bullpen.

Closer Jeurys Familia ($7.425 million) and AJ Ramos ($6.55 million) are arbitration eligible, and assuming they win their cases will earn at least $8.5 million, and Jerry Blevins option for $7 million has already been picked up. That already adds up to at least $24 million for three relievers, and you figure up to four more. If one of them is reportedly Shaw, who played under new Mets manager Mickey Callaway last season in Cleveland, that works in their favor.

What doesn’t is the depth in the Mets’ bullpen at the back end. Reed and Gregerson should both command over $8 million, while Shaw should get at least $7 million. Now, you’ve all followed the Mets for a long time, and do you really think they will pay at least $7 million to four or five relievers?

That’s to start. All these free-agent relievers are looking for opportunities to close, and if they are asked to sacrifice that role to come to the Mets, they likely would want to be paid like a closer in order to take a lesser role.

I’m not saying the Mets won’t add a reliever, or if any of the relievers they added in their midseason purge of their offensive power will make it, or if any of the arms currently on their roster will develop. I’m saying that knowing how the Mets do things, if they go outside the organization to add to their bullpen it will cost them.

 

Oct 27

Mets Weren’t Going To Get Girardi Anyway

The immediate reaction to hearing the Yankees wouldn’t bring back manager Joe Girardi is the Mets blew it and should have waited on hiring Mickey Callaway. That way, they could’ve made a run at Girardi.

I would have loved Girardi, but don’t blame the Mets. They did exactly what I suggested they do, and that to go about their business and ignore what the Yankees are doing.

GIRARDI: Wouldn't happen. (CBS)

GIRARDI: Wouldn’t happen. (CBS)

The Yankees have their reasons for dumping Girardi, ranging for Brian Cashman’s clichéd comment “it is time for a change,’’ to the manager’s intense personality to his clash with management over using analytics.

Of course, little was made of those things while Girardi was winning 910 games over ten seasons, reaching the playoffs six times and winning the World Series in 2009.

The Mets could have waited to see if the Yankees would have been so arrogant as to fire such a successful manager, but were right to go ahead with their search according to their timetable.

Girardi was a long shot in the first place as I don’t believe the Mets would have given him more than the $4 million annually he made with the Yankees and there would have been the inevitable clash with GM Sandy Alderson over analytics.

If Girardi wants to manage immediately, we could see him in Citi Field soon enough as there are openings in Washington and Philadelphia.

 

Oct 26

How About Darling As Pitching Coach?

I don’t know who is on Mickey Callaway‘s short list of pitching coach candidates, so I felt compelled to offer a suggestion. This guy knows pitching and is familiar with Mets’ pitchers and their problems over the years. Plus, he’s a combination of old school with a knowledge of analytics, and has strong ties to the Mets.

I’ve never asked Ron Darling if he has any interest in coaching, but he brings so much to the table. The current Mets pitchers are familiar with Darling and I presume he has their respect. He knows where Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler have struggled and why they’ve been injured.

In addition, he could be a perfect buffer in helping Callaway get acclimated to New York. He could certainly help in bringing Callaway and his new staff together.

One thing I know about Darling after listening to him all these years is his disdain for walks, something that crippled Mets’ pitchers this season.

I don’t know what Callaway is thinking, but it’s worth putting a call into Darling to find out what he’s thinking.

Oct 23

Callaway Era Begins

Sure, it was a gamble, and nobody knows how Mickey Callaway will pan out as the 21st manager in Mets’ history, but after listening to him this afternoon GM Sandy Alderson deserves credit for thinking outside the box.

I wondered yesterday whether Callaway represents a risk as to whether Alderson reached out and got the Mets a nugget or whether he was seduced by a hot “flavor of the month.”

NEW METS ERA

           NEW METS ERA

Alderson said the Mets had on their board a list of roughly 35 names and after their research, they whittled it down to six. Originally, Alderson planned a second round of interviews, but Callaway blew him away with his session.

“All of us came out of [Callaway’s interview] excited for the possibility that Mickey would be our manager,’’ Alderson said. “That’s a visceral reaction, not one that you can put down on a checklist, but to me that said everything. I think it was consistent throughout.’’

Callaway said the feeling was mutual.

“When I sat in the room and listened to the words that Sandy, [assistant general managers J.P. Ricciardi and John Ricco] and [Chief Operating Officer] Jeff [Wilpon] were saying to me and the questions they were asking me, I knew right then we were going to be in alignment in what we wanted,’’ Callaway said. “That’s why I was so excited when I called my family after. The team itself, the pitching is something that can be some of the greatest guys on the planet. So that obviously is very exciting to me.’’

Callaway impressed today at Citi Field with his enthusiasm and charisma.

“First, we’re in the greatest city in the world,’’ Callaway said. “This is one of the greatest franchises in the world. … When I look at the New York Mets, I see a team that can contend and compete with anybody and that’s what we’ll work hard to do.’’

Secondly, and this might be most important, is his pitching background. If the Mets are to get back to the postseason, they must pitch. The 42-year-old Callaway built a staff in Cleveland that included Corey Kluber, Trevor Bauer, Carlos Carrasco and Andrew Miller that led the majors in ERA (3.30), strikeouts (1,614) and strikeouts per nine innings (10.1).

Callaway favors fastballs and curveballs opposed to the sliders under former pitching coach Dan Warthen. It will be interesting to see if there is a reduction in the number of sliders thrown and how it might cause a decrease in the injuries that crippled the staff for the past two years.

Callaway has already spoken with several players – but only singled out David Wright – and said he was eager to start making calls. But, one of his first orders of business is working with Alderson and his staff on finding a pitching coach.

“We already have a partial list, we want to make sure it’s as inclusive as possible,’’ Alderson said. “I think Mickey and the front office will work collaboratively to find someone that he’s comfortable with. One of the things that we’re going to do over the next few days is put together a list of potential pitching coaches.

“I think that it’s important to recognize that yes, Mickey is a former pitching coach and it’s important for us because that’s our strength. But at the same time, Mickey will be focused entirely on the 25-man roster and the pitching coach will be very important.’’

While Terry Collins’ name wasn’t mentioned today, there was a disconnect between several of the younger players and the former manager. Callaway vows that won’t happen with him.

“We’re going to care more about the players than anyone has before. We’re going to value their work. Value their dedication,’’ Callaway promised. “I’m going to reach out to the players. I know they got the news obviously from some other source than myself, but I’m going to reach out to them, let them know how excited I am, and we’re going to start this very, very important 2018 offseason. These next three months are going to be critical to what we try to do in the season and we’re going to get to work right away.’’

And, there’s so much work to be done.

Oct 22

Breaking News: Mets To Name Callaway As Manager

Multiple reports are saying the Mets have named Mickey Callaway, the pitching coach of the Indians since 2013 as their new manager, beating out a huge pool of candidates.

Kevin Long, Manny Acta, Bob Geren, Robin Ventura, Joe McEwing and Alex Cora were reportedly among those GM Sandy Alderson was considering.

Callaway will replace Terry Collins, who was forced out and took a position in the team’s front office after a disastrous, injury-filled 70-92 record this season.

Like everybody else considered, Callaway represents a gamble as it remains to be seen whether Alderson reached out and got the Mets a nugget or whether he was seduced by a hot “flavor of the month.”

Callaway, 42, built the Indians’ pitching staff into one of the best as they led the majors in ERA (3.30) and strikeouts (1,614), shutouts (19), complete games (7) and finished third with an opponents’ batting average of just .236. But, don’t forget, he’s not bringing Corey Kluber, Trevor Bauer or Carlos Carrasco with him.

Among Callaway’s first priorities is getting, and keeping, the Mets’ young pitchers healthy as the Mets’ season imploded with injuries to Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler.