Dec 30

Mets Still In It For Stephen Drew, But Why?

The New York Mets reportedly still have interest in free agent shortstop Stephen Drew, which is puzzling. If the Mets are to be consistent with their previous spending policies, they should pass on Drew and move on with Ruben Tejada.

The Mets backed off on outfielder Michael Bourn last winter as to not give up a compensatory draft pick. As it turned out, the Mets made a good decision, one that enabled them to get a look at Juan Lagares.

DREW: Should pass.

DREW: Should pass.

Not only would Mets have to give up a pick for Drew, they’d also have to start the package at $14.1 million. This would be one big E-6.

This for a 30-year-old shortstop who hit .253 with a .333 on-base percentage, 14 homers and 67 RBI last year for Boston. Yes, Drew played a solid shortstop, but for where the Mets are, for what they are attempting to do fiscally, and for their rebuilding blueprint, he does not make sense.

None.

Nobody knows what the Mets will get from Tejada, but he’s worth another look, especially for a team whose timetable to compete remains a year down the road.

Giving Tejada another year is a better, less-taxing option than to get hooked into Drew for at least three-years, which is what agent Scott Boras most assuredly will be seeking.

There are no guarantees with or without Tejada, or Drew, as to their performance, but from a building prospect, the Mets still have needs, some of them pressing and likely costly, that will be better addressed than adding Drew.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Nov 05

Only One Player Given Qualifying Offer Interests Mets, Who Should Be Wary Of Shin-Soo Choo

Early speculation of whom the New York Mets might consider in the free-agent market could turn out to be pricey as 13 free agents received qualifying offers from their respective teams. Not surprisingly, no Met free agent was given a qualifying offer, but three Yankees – Robinson CanoHiroki Kuroda and Curtis Granderson – were given the $14.1 million offer.

CHOO: Mets Should Be Cautious.

CHOO: Mets Should Be Cautious.

That figure was derived at averaging the top 125 salaries from 2013, and each player offered that amount regardless of his salary last season.

The list includes Carlos Beltran, Cano, Shin-Soo Choo, Nelson Cruz, Stephen Drew, Jacoby Ellsbury, Granderson, Ubaldo Jimenez, Kuroda, Brian McCann, Kendrys Morales, Mike Napoli and Ervin Santana.

Numerous media outlets at one time had linked Beltran, Choo, Cruz, Drew, Ellsbury, Granderson and Napoli to the Mets, but only in speculative terms.

The players have until 5 p.m., next Monday to accept the qualifying offer, and if they do will have agreed to a one-year, $14.1 million contract. If the player rejects the offer his former team will be awarded either a first or second-round draft pick as compensation.

The Mets’ first-round pick – tenth overall in the draft – is protected and determined on their 2013 record of 74-88, but general manager Sandy Alderson said losing a second-round pick would not be a deterrent.

You’ll recall the compensation issue is why the Mets did not go after outfielder Michael Bourn last season. Bourn eventually signed with Cleveland and the Mets eventually settled on minor leaguer Juan Lagares in center fielder.

Of the players on the list, the Mets appear to be the most serious about the 31-year-old Choo, but reportedly won’t go beyond four years. The Mets’ needs at shortstop and outfield had them thinking about Drew and Ellsbury, but $14.1 million would be too high for Drew, but palatable for Ellsbury.

However, in many cases with qualifying offers, the team signing them does so as a mechanism to buy negotiating time to work out a multi-year deal.

The Mets are expected to swim in the middle depths of the free-agent pool, which is what Boston did last year in building its championship team with the signings of Drew, Napoli and Shane Victorino.

Choo fits into that category, but he’s not one to build around. He has averaged 20 homers and 81 RBI during his nine-year career with Seattle, Cleveland and Cincinnati. However, those are hitters parks and he was surrounded by better line-ups than what he’d have with the Mets in Citi Field.

Choo hit .285 last year – 24 points below his career-high of .309 in 2009, but drew 112 walks in compiling a .423 on-base percentage, his most important statistic.

If signed, Choo would slot into center leading to a competition in right between Juan Lagares and Matt den Dekker.

Red flags for Choo are 133 strikeouts and only 54 RBI for his 21 homers (conceding he hit at the top of the order). He averages 146 strikeouts a season during his career, something the Mets have had far too much of those. Frankly, his production doesn’t warrant the strikeouts.

Choo made $7.3 million last year from the Reds, and during his career earned a total of $17.5 million, so the qualifying offer represents a huge raise for him. However, the market doesn’t work where the Mets can make a take-it-or-leave it offer. Especially, with his agent being Scott Boras, known to not leave money on the table. It is highly likely the qualifying offer will be rejected and Choo will enter the market.

Considering he has played in 150 games only four times during his career, his career .288 average doesn’t seem like much to warrant giving four years. If I am giving four years on a player with a qualifying offer, I’d overpay for Ellsbury and know I would be getting a star. I would also rather bring back Beltran for a couple of seasons.

The most I’d give Choo is two years for $28.2 million (two years of the qualifying offer) plus an option. Anything more would be excessive considering the Mets’ other needs.

 

Sep 25

Mets Wrap: Suggesting Sandy Alderson Would Tank To Get Better Draft Pick Is Irresponsible

Why is this even a question to the New York Mets?

ALDERSON: Stupid to suggest he would tank.

ALDERSON: Stupid to suggest he would tank.

Yes, the issue of the protected pick surfaced last season when the Mets considered signing Michael Bourn as a free agent. Major League Baseball wrongly ruled in that case.

However, this time, the issue of draft-pick compensation surfaced in relation to the team winning or losing on the field prior to the playing of a game.

There’s a huge difference, which some writers and/or bloggers are clearly ignorant of knowing. It was ridiculously posted on one website – which has close ties to the Mets – that the author wrote Alderson would rather have the Mets lose to be in better draft position.

This writer has been known to waffle and I question the validity of his “insiders.’’ Personally, I have forgotten more baseball than he could hope to know.

After today’s 1-0 victory at Cincinnati, Alderson said the pick be damned.

“We’re trying to build the credibility of the franchise and that goes beyond where we’re picking in the draft,’’ Alderson said.

Good for him.

I don’t always agree with Alderson, but I do one-hundred percent here. There’s not a doubt in my mind.

Personally, if any blogger or writer suggested Alderson wanted to lose, that’s way out of bounds. It’s libelous because it attacks Alderson’s credibility not only as a general manager, but also as a man.

No major league baseball employee – either player, coach, manager or executive – wants his team to lose. It is extremely distasteful to even consider.

It is why Pete Rose, the all-time hit leader, was banned for life. No, Rose didn’t flat out bet on his Reds to lose, but not betting on them to win is close to the same result.

Alderson would lose his credibility if he admitted he wanted to Mets to lose to gain a better pick. If I owned the team I would fire him on the spot if he had. Even if Alderson thought that way he’d be stupid to admit so.

This entire compensation issue is ridiculous for Major League Baseball to even have because it creates the appearance issue of “tanking.’’ And, draft pick positioning based on anything other than pure won-loss records is shameful and nothing more than a gimmick.

In that regard, the National Football League has it right, while the National Basketball Association forever has it wrong. But, less we forget, that’s David Stern’s league and he’s had it wrong for a long time with a lot of issues. The draft lottery is a cheap gimmick that leads to the appearances of teams tanking and a fixed draft.

It has been that way since the Patrick Ewing draft.

Then again, Stern’s league has had a referee found guilty of fixing games.

Like him or not, Alderson doesn’t deserve the poisonous barb of preferring to lose.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

 

 

Sep 08

In Retrospect Mets Made Right Call In Passing On Michael Bourn

Watching the New York Mets this weekend in Cleveland reinforced the adage the best deals are the ones you don’t make.

The Mets were heavily criticized last winter for their choice not to sign free-agent outfielder Michael Bourn from Atlanta because they didn’t to give up the compensatory draft pick.

Bourn was supposed to give the Mets the leadoff hitter they lacked plus a defensive anchor in center field. For the first two months of the season the Mets lamented not getting Bourn as they went through ten leadoff hitters before settling on Eric Young, and used eight center fielders with Juan Lagares having the inside track heading into spring training.

As for Bourn, the Mets didn’t miss his .263 average with five homers, 40 RBI, paltry .317 on-base percentage and 22 stolen bases.

n the end, the Mets waited, filled two voids and saved themselves over $40 million in the process.

SECOND OPINION FOR HARVEY: Perhaps the most important decision to impact the Mets over the next two years will whether Matt Harvey will proceed with Tommy John surgery.

Harvey’s initial thought was to rest in the hope he’ll be ready for Opening Day 2014, but conventional wisdom dictates surgery. In that regard, a decision could be made as soon as this week after an exam with Dr. James Andrews.

The sooner the surgery, the sooner the rehab and the sooner the return, but it isn’t expected to be before the start of the 2015 season.

MORE CALL-UPS: The Mets are expected to include Ruben Tejada in their latest group of call-ups. Tejada his .288 with 24 RBI at Triple-A Las Vegas.

Outfielder Mike Baxter and catcher Juan Centeno are also expected to be brought up.

TODAY’S BATTING ORDER:

Eric Young, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Josh Satin, DH

Lucas Duda, 1B

Justin Turner, 3B

Juan Lagares, RF

Matt den Dekker, CF

Anthony Recker, C

Omar Quintanilla, SS

Daisuke Matsuzaka, RHP

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Mar 03

Alderson Has No Regrets On Not Getting Bourn Or Upton

The Mets aren’t exactly sprinting out of the spring training gate – and their outfield remains a question – but GM Sandy Alderson doesn’t have any regrets about not signing Michael Bourn or trading for Justin Upton.

The asking price for Bourn was money and a draft pick while the price for Upton might have included Matt Harvey or Zack Wheeler, neither of whom the Mets were willing to deal.

Parting with either, or the pick, was contrary to the Mets’ plan of building from within. Now wasn’t the time to regress in that objective.

“We’re not that far away,’’ Alderson said in a phone interview. “I hate to deal in speculation, but let’s just say for example that we had signed Michael Bourn or we had traded for Justin Upton if things had fallen and we were able to keep Wheeler or keep Harvey, people would be looking at the Mets very differently.

“We’re not going to do anything unless we look like we’re smarter than the other guy. No. But right now, we have to be careful before we pull that trigger.’’

The dilemma Mets faced was they believe they have future difference makers in Wheeler and Harvey, with the latter potentially proving that this summer. Meanwhile, as good as Bourn and Upton can be, Alderson doesn’t think either would have raised the Mets to contender status.

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