Sep 15

Why Not DeGrom Or D’Arnaud For NL Rookie Honors?

Why not Jacob deGrom? Or Travis d’Arnaud?

Usually, the Rookie of the Year Award goes to hitters, as the writers tend to favor offense and the everyday player. When it comes to that, deGrom’s stiffest competition could come from teammate d’Arnaud, who leads NL Rookies with 13 homers and is second with 40 RBI, despite a .243 average in 102 games.

DeGrom: Viable NL Rookie candidate.

DeGrom: Viable NL Rookie candidate.

Had d’Arnaud played the entire season he might he the consensus pick.

Cincinnati’s Billy Hamilton figures to be the other best bet, hitting .259 with six homers and 48 RBI in a league-leading 144 games for NL Rookies. Cubs third baseman Mike Olt has 12 homers and 32 RBI, but with a .154 average.

Hamilton plays center field, while d’Arnaud is a catcher, both difficult positions to break in with considering the defensive responsibilities.

DeGrom, tonight’s starter against Miami at Citi Field, trails Arizona’s Chase Anderson in record, 9-6 to 8-6, but leads him in innings pitched (127.1-109.1) and strikeouts (121-100) and has given up far fewer homers (7-16). As far as pitchers go, it has to be one of the two.

Other Mets under consideration are Wilmer Flores, Eric Campbell and Jeurys Familia.

If a Met wins, he will become the fifth Rookie of the Year in franchise history, joining Tom Seaver (1969), Jon Matlack (1972), Darryl Strawberry (1983) and Dwight Gooden (1984).

So, why not deGrom or d’Arnaud?

Mar 19

Mets Today: Goin’ Fishing

Today is one of the most anticipated days of spring training for the New York Mets. It is their off day, which means they can sleep in, play golf, take in a movie, go out to lunch and dinner.

Outside of those needing treatment – hello Ike Davis and Lucas Duda – a few pitchers might throw to maintain their routines.

Other than that, the Mets’ complex will be closed.

Davis and Duda will assuredly receive treatment because manager Terry Collins said either could play in Thursday’s exhibition game against Atlanta.

Neither player has run in minor league and intrasquad games. They have only run in conditioning drills.

Collins announced his rotation following the off day:

Thursday vs. Atlanta: Zack Wheeler.

Friday vs. Minnesota: Dillon Gee

Saturday vs. Miami: Bartolo Colon

Sunday (split squads) vs. Atlanta and Washington: Jenrry Mejia and John Lannan, respectively.

Monday vs. St. Louis: Daisuke Matsuzaka

Mar 05

Mets Wrap: Lose Both Ends Of Split Squad Game; Mejia Said He’s Fine

The best news of an otherwise dismal day for the New York Mets is that Jenrry Mejia said he is pain free.

Mejia gave up one run in two innings in a game where the Mets were routed, 11-5, by the Washington Nationals at Viera, Fla.  The Mets also lost their Port St. Lucie game, 5-2 in 10 innings, to the Miami Marlins.

Mejia, in competition for the fifth-starter job, but with the possibility of working out of the bullpen, gave up an unearned run on one hit, two walks and three strikeouts in two innings.

Not in the box score was how his surgically-repaired elbow felt.

“That’s the most important thing – I feel better, I feel good right now,’’ Mejia told “Everything is fine.’’

In addition:

* Things weren’t fine for reliever Cory Mazzoni, who was rocked for seven runs in one inning by the Nationals. Things might have been better for him had Wilmer Flores not missed a tag at second base on a throw from the outfield. The play might have opened the door, but Mazzoni still must find a way to get the outs needed.

* Also having a rough time was reliever Gonzalez Germen, who gave up three runs over 32 pitches in the loss to Miami.

* I don’t know why, but it appears the experiment with Flores at shortstop is over. Terry Collins wanted to get a look at him at shortstop, but with Ruben Tejada ailing and two games to choose from, Flores played second base. Makes no sense to me, unless the experiment is over, which is a bad call this early.

* Neither Tejada nor Ike Davis is expected to play tomorrow. Friday at the earliest.


Mar 01

Bobby Parnell Throws BP; Line-ups Against Miami

New York Mets closer Bobby Parnell said he cleared a “mental hurdle’’ after throwing a 35-pitch batting practice this morning. Parnell threw to David Wright, Daniel Murphy and Eric Young. He threw a mix of curveballs and fastballs.

Parnell was especially satisfied with his command, and that he experienced no discomfort when he followed batted balls with his head.

“Going early like this, you don’t expect to be perfect,’’ Parnell told reporters. “By no means was I, but everything was down and I feel like I can work off that really well. … I didn’t know how I’d react to balls off the bat. I try not to do a lot of herky-jerky stuff with my neck.’’

Incidentally, Parnell’s session marked the first on-field work for Young, who had been sidelined with a strained muscle in his side.

Young is not expected to play in an exhibition game until early next week.

In another injury-related item, Jonathon Niese (sore shoulder) and Bartolo Colon (tight calf) played catch. There is no word when either will throw off a mound next.

Here’s today’s starting line-up against Miami:

Chris Young, cf: Leading off for the second straight game.

Kirk Nieuwenhuis, rf: Seems to have fallen off the map.

Andrew Brown, dh: Likely minor league candidate.

Lucas Duda, 1b: Had a hit Friday. Makes first appearance at first.

Zach Lutz, 3b: Replaces Wright again.

Taylor Teagarden, c: Makes first appearance.

Matt den Dekker, lf: Coming back from stomach virus

Anthony Seratelli, 2b: Long-shot to make team.

Omar Quintanilla, ss: Will stick as infield reserve.

John Lannan, lhp: Fifth-starter candidate.

Dec 29

Similarities Between Mets And Jets

The New York Mets and Jets entered their respective seasons wearing the dysfunctional label, and ended them with other similarities, including the decisions to keep their on-field leaders.

The Jets’ choice to keep the embattled Rex Ryan mirrored that of the Mets to keep Terry Collins. Both took terrible, underachieving teams and exceeded expectations. For awhile this summer, .500 was not out of the question until Matt Harvey’s season-ending elbow injury.

For most of their season, the Jets, pegged by many to not win more than four or five games, finished at .500 with today’s victory at Miami, and it wasn’t until recently their playoff aspirations were snuffed out.

The primary reasons for keeping Collins was because the Mets made greater than expected improvement despite numerous personnel deficiencies and because the team continually played hard for him.

The Mets’ most significant personnel weakness is offense, which is also the Jets’ Achilles Heel.

Going with a rookie quarterback, a weak offensive line, and nothing significant in the backfield or at receiver, the Jets did just enough to win half their games.

In the end, the Mets decided the team improved to the point where it didn’t want to endure another rebuilding program.

Realistically, the Jets – especially defensively – played hard for Ryan, who coached with lame-duck status a new quarterback, under a new defensive coordinator and new general manager.

The Jets could have packed it in, but despite being undermanned offensively, played with integrity to give the team something to build on.

Just like with the Mets.

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