Oct 27

Mets’ 2015 Spring Training Schedule

The World Series isn’t even over and the Mets announced today their 2015 Spring Training schedule.

March

4: At Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.

5: At Washington, 5:05 p.m.

6: Detroit, 1:10 p.m.

7: Split Squad: Atlanta, 1:10 p.m., and at Miami, 1:05 p.m.

8. Boston, 1:10 p.m.

9. Miami, 1:10 p.m.

10. At Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.

11. At Miami, 1:05 p.m.

12. Washington, 1:10 p.m.

13. Atlanta, 1:10 p.m.

14. Washington, 1:10 p.m.

15. At Tampa Bay, 1:05 p.m.

16. At Boston, 1:05 p.m.

17. Miami, 1:10 p.m.

18: OFF DAY

19. Split Squad: Houston at 1:10 p.m., and at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.

20. St. Louis, 1:10 p.m.

21. At Detroit, at 1:05 p.m.

22. Yankees, 1:10 p.m.

23. At Miami, 1:05 p.m.

24. Houston, 1:10 p.m.

25. At Yankees, 1:05 p.m.

26. At Washington, 5:05 p.m.

27. At St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.

28. Washington, 1:10 p.m.

29. At St. Louis, 1:05 p.m.

30. Miami, 1:10 p.m.

31. At Washington, 1:05 p.m.

APRIL

St. Louis, 1:10 p.m.

At St. Louis, 12:05 p.m.

At Rangers in Texas, 8:05 p.m.

At Rangers in Texas, 2:05 p.m.

For ticket information, go to www.stluciemets.com or call 772-871-2115

 

Sep 23

Mets To Extend Alderson; Collins To Follow

The news many Mets’ don’t want to hear – a reported three-year extension for general manager Sandy Alderson – is expected to come down later this afternoon.

Not long after will come the anticipated return of manager Terry Collins.

ALDERSON: To be extended.

ALDERSON: To be extended.

After floundering much of the season between ten games under and five games over .500, the prevailing winds had many Mets’ fans howling for a change at the upper management.

Barring a complete collapse I never thought it would happen, and I still don’t.

Both were given “Get out of jail free’’ cards after the news Matt Harvey would miss the season. Despite that, a weak offense and myriad of other issues, the Mets are 76-80 this season after 156 games compared to 71-85 at the same time in 2013, an improvement of five games.

Just how could the Mets not bring them back, especially considering their mantra has been to make improvement?

Sure, there are grumblings about Alderson not spending – that’s ownership’s edict – and Collins’ in-game managing, but you can only do so much with limited resources.

For the most part, Alderson has the Mets in a better state than when he took over with potentially a strong core of starting pitching. Also for the most part, the Mets play hard for Collins.

I’m not always crazy about Alderson’s lack of aggressiveness in the free-agent market, and some of his decisions – particularly Chris Young and Frank Francisco in recent winters. However, I applaud him not being seduced by overpaying for the big fish.

Collins does make some head-scratching comments, such as suggesting New York isn’t that far from Washington, which only makes sense if your measuring stick is miles and not player talent.

The Mets have surpassed Philadelphia and Miami in the NL East and enter tonight’s game tied with Atlanta for second. Be honest, you would’ve taken that in a heartbeat if it was offered coming out of spring training.

The Mets still have a lot of issues after this season, but they aren’t the hopeless mess they used to be, even with their murky financial picture.

 

Sep 16

Colon Was Good Investment

Bartolo Colon gets the ball tonight for the Mets against Miami, and honestly I’m surprised he’s still here. I thought they would have dealt him at the end of July or August.

But, he’s still pitching and leads the team with 13 victories, and if he gets two more starts after tonight could finish with 200 innings. The latter number, more than the wins, is why the Mets signed him.

With Matt Harvey out, the Mets needed an innings eater, which defines a healthy Colon in his career. Seven times in 17 seasons he’s thrown over 200 innings; three more times, including this year, he’s worked over 180 innings. He’s given the Mets at least seven innings in 17 starts and given up three or fewer runs in 19.

For $10 million, that’s not a bad investment. However, if the Mets improve as the organization hopes next season – and Colon again pitches well – he’ll likely be dealt at the trade deadline.

He’ll be 42 next year and if the Mets aren’t in contention, there’s no way they won’t deal him for minor league depth.

Sep 15

Why Not DeGrom Or D’Arnaud For NL Rookie Honors?

Why not Jacob deGrom? Or Travis d’Arnaud?

Usually, the Rookie of the Year Award goes to hitters, as the writers tend to favor offense and the everyday player. When it comes to that, deGrom’s stiffest competition could come from teammate d’Arnaud, who leads NL Rookies with 13 homers and is second with 40 RBI, despite a .243 average in 102 games.

DeGrom: Viable NL Rookie candidate.

DeGrom: Viable NL Rookie candidate.

Had d’Arnaud played the entire season he might he the consensus pick.

Cincinnati’s Billy Hamilton figures to be the other best bet, hitting .259 with six homers and 48 RBI in a league-leading 144 games for NL Rookies. Cubs third baseman Mike Olt has 12 homers and 32 RBI, but with a .154 average.

Hamilton plays center field, while d’Arnaud is a catcher, both difficult positions to break in with considering the defensive responsibilities.

DeGrom, tonight’s starter against Miami at Citi Field, trails Arizona’s Chase Anderson in record, 9-6 to 8-6, but leads him in innings pitched (127.1-109.1) and strikeouts (121-100) and has given up far fewer homers (7-16). As far as pitchers go, it has to be one of the two.

Other Mets under consideration are Wilmer Flores, Eric Campbell and Jeurys Familia.

If a Met wins, he will become the fifth Rookie of the Year in franchise history, joining Tom Seaver (1969), Jon Matlack (1972), Darryl Strawberry (1983) and Dwight Gooden (1984).

So, why not deGrom or d’Arnaud?