Jun 30

Mets Waste Another DeGrom Start

The Mets began the season favored by many to make the playoffs. After an 11-1 start, the Mets are 16 games under .500 and currently in sole possession of last place in the NL East.

They just finished their worst ever month of June at 5-21 and just this week assistant general manager John Ricco officially putting up the “For Sale’’ sign outside Citi Field.

DE GROM: Another start wasted. (AP)

DE GROM: Another start wasted. (AP)

They are on pace to win just 65 games in manager Mickey Callaway’s first season. Callaway, who has already called a team meeting – something he said he didn’t want to do – said after today’s 5-2 loss to the Miami Marlins, who already waived a white flag before Opening Day, yelling at his players in public won’t do anything.

Maybe not, but it might feel good to let off a lot of steam.

Outside of stinking up the joint, the only thing the Mets have consistently done this season is waste sterling starts by Jacob deGrom. They are now 6-11 when deGrom starts. He is having an All-Star type season with a 1.80 ERA.

Today, the did every wrong thing imaginable.

The Marlins broke a 2-2 tie in the sixth when Wilmer Flores misplayed a dribbler up the first base line. Flores hesitated instead of aggressively charging the ball.  Of course, first base isn’t Flores’ natural position. Dominick Smith is a supposed the be a highly-touted first base prospect.

However, the lefty-swinging Smith didn’t start for the third straight game against a right-handed pitcher.

This begs the obvious question: If Smith doesn’t play against right-handed pitching, then why is he here?

Then, in the seventh, the Marlins broke the game open on J.T. Realmuto’s two-run double, which was set up by Amed Rosario’s error.

In the seventh, Jose Reyes, pinch-hit for deGrom and jogged to first. Callaway calmly confronted Reyes in the dugout, and the player everybody is wondering why he’s still here, lamely told the manager “he felt something’’ in his legs.

If you hung around long enough, you might have felt something in your gut.

With the Mets having eight games against Philadelphia and Washington prior to the All-Star break, it’s conceivable they could be more than 20 games under by then.

It’s conceivable they could be as many as 40 games under when this miserable season ends.

“I’m tired of losing, to be honest with you,” said a glum deGrom.

As we all are.

Nov 22

Would You Trade A Package That Includes Cespedes And Harvey For Stanton?

Derek Jeter is hell bent on trading Giancarlo Stanton, primarily because he wants to shed the Miami Marlins of his $295-million salary. Now, we know the Mets don’t have the barrel of young talent to sway Jeter, but what if they offered a package that includes Yoenis Cespedes, Steven Matz, Matt Harvey, Hansel Robles and Juan Lagares?

I would offer it if I were the Mets, but would you?

STANTON: How much would you give for him? (Getty)

STANTON: How much would you give for him? (Getty)

This is a five-for-one trade, and the Mets would be adding to three voids in the Marlins’ 25-man roster – starting pitching, bullpen and outfield, and in doing so would slice Miami’s payroll.

Cespedes, of course, isn’t near the player of Stanton, but assuming he’s healthy, the Mets would be giving the Marlins a bat of 35-homer potential plus he would be a gate attraction for Miami’s huge Cuban population base. And, considering Cespedes has a home in Vero Beach, Fla., he might be inclined to accept the trade.

The Marlins have a strong outfield of Stanton, Christian Yelich and Marcell Ozuna, but possess little depth, which is why Lagares might be enticing to them.

The Marlins are in desperate need of starting pitching, but they would be taking a gamble about the health of Matz and Harvey. While the Mets have their issues with Robles, he’s not exactly a throw-in.

The Marlins are so desperate to get rid of Stanton’s salary they just might bite on this proposal. As for the Mets, this would be so ballsy of them to pull it off.  And, if they did, I promise I wouldn’t rip GM Sandy Alderson ever again.

Or, at least not until Opening Day.

May 05

Today’s Question: What Montero Will Mets Get?

The Mets return home tonight to open a six-game homestand against the Miami Marlins. It will be the second time already this season the Marlins have been to Citi Field.

Rafael Montero will get the ball in place of Noah Syndergaard.

MONTERO: Who will Mets see? (AP)

MONTERO: Who will Mets see? (AP)

Today’s question is obvious, will we get the Montero whom the Mets were so high on, or will we get the version that last year fell out of favor because he couldn’t find the strike zone?

At one time Montero was a highly regarded pitching prospect, perhaps on a level just below Jacob deGrom, but was always held back by his command. In three starts last season, Montero pitched 11 innings and compiled 14 walks and a 7.36 ERA.

Montero isn’t doing much better this year, with eight walks in 6.2 innings, all of them in relief. He’s also given up eight runs (9.45 ERA).

The Mets don’t have any options other than Montero until Seth Lugo or Steven Matz are eligible to come off the disable list in the next month or so.

Mar 23

Mets Boast Formidable Lineup

The Mets’ batting order will vary depending on the opposing pitcher and who are the hot hitters. However, the lineup manager Terry Collins started Wednesday against the Miami Marlins is the one he’ll likely write in most days.

And, when clicking it can be very formidable.

REYES: The catalyst. (AP)

REYES: The catalyst. (AP)

Jose Reyes, 3B: With David Wright to open the season on the disabled list and Reyes playing every day, there’s no need to search for another leadoff hitter and we won’t see him in the outfield. Backup: Wilmer Flores, T.J. Rivera.

Asdrubal Cabrera, SS: He produced in this slot last year and there’s no reason to change. He has the power to be a run- producer high in the order and bat control to advance runners. Backup: Reyes with Flores playing third that day.

Yoenis Cespedes, LF: Traditionally, your best hitter bats third. That’s Cespedes, no question. Backup: It will depend whether Michael Conforto or Brandon Nimmo are on the roster.

Curtis Granderson, CF: He homered twice Wednesday and if he’s hitting that’s sufficient protection for Cespedes. A potential issue is stacking two high-strikeout hitters back-to-back. Backup: The only true center fielder is Juan Lagares.

Neil Walker, 2B: I like putting a switch-hitter between Granderson and Jay Bruce. Let’s hope he shows the power he did last season. Backup: Rivera and/or Flores.

Bruce, RF: Let’s face it, there will be no immediate trade involving Bruce. And, with the $13 million they are paying him, he will play which could leave Conforto on the outs. He could open the season in the minor leagues to get consistent at-bats. Backup: If he stays, Conforto could be a factor. If not, Granderson would return to his natural position.

Lucas Duda, 1B: He’s healthy – knock on wood – for now. With the hitters immediately ahead of him, Duda should have plenty of RBI opportunities. Duda has had a good spring and has been driving the ball to the opposite field. Backup: Flores is the first option. Potential backup Bruce hasn’t gotten enough playing time at the position.

Travis d’Arnaud, C: Somebody has to hit eighth. He’s had a good spring at the plate, but his throwing needs work. Backup: Rene Rivera, but we’ll see Kevin Plawecki this summer.

Collins consistently said last year’s offense was built to hit the long ball, and this season should be no different as he has four sluggers who have hit 30 homers in a season, with three of them – Granderson, Bruce and Duda – left-handed added to Cespedes. Even so, it was encouraging to hear Collins say he wanted to push the envelope offensively and manufacture runs. The flip side is those four are also capable to strike out over 100 times.

For that to happen, the Mets must strike out less and walk more and emphasize the need for making productive outs and improve their hitting with runners in scoring position.

Mar 22

Matz Hammered; Fastball Command Off

What had been a strong spring for Steven Matz following elbow surgery, turned sour Wednesday when he was routed by the Miami Marlins. The positive take on giving up five earned runs on eight hits in four innings (79 pitches) are the following: 1) his outing wasn’t injury related, 2) there wasn’t anything wrong with his fastball velocity, 3) considering he has been consistent this spring, today should go down as “one of those games,” and 4) he quickly identified his problem.

MATZ: Still has work to do. (AP)

MATZ: Still has work to do. (AP)

“I think just fastball command,” Matz told reporters. “I gave up a hit on a curveball to [Matt] den Dekker. Other than that, they were all fastballs. Spring Training is about fastball command, and I’ll keep hammering away at that.

“I was up in the zone. Last time, I was up out of the zone and had some walks. This time, [the fastballs] were up in the zone, and they were able to get their barrels to it more. I felt like mechanically, I was OK, but the ball was just up in the zone. That’s right where the bat path is, and they were able to hit them pretty hard.”

The negative take is that fastball command should usually be on this late in spring training, and if Matz doesn’t regain it in his remaining one or two starts then there could be a problem. My thinking is today was “one of those games,” and a red flag isn’t waving.

My concern with Matz is whether he’ll get enough work this spring. The conventional wisdom on a starter’s innings in spring training has usually been in the high 20s up to 30 innings. With his four innings today, Matz has 12.2 innings and assuming five in his next start that’s not even 20. Especially coming off surgery he might not be strong enough.

“I’m glad I’ve got one or two more starts before the season comes,” Matz said. “You try to not let this stuff bother you, but still. when you’re getting hit around, it’s never fun. I’ll take away something and bring it to my next start.”