Mar 20

Mets Today: Davis Plays, Wheeler Starts, Lineup

The New York Mets could field close to their Opening Day lineup for today’s game against Atlanta in Port St. Lucie.

We have an Ike Davis sighting. Davis, in the lineup for the first time since March 2 because of tightness in his calves, will play first and bat sixth.

Meanwhile, the other ailing first baseman, Lucas Duda (strained hamstring) will start in a minor league game.

Daniel Murphy will not play because of a tight right calf.

Zack Wheeler, the projected No. 4 starter, will get the ball.

Here’s the lineup:

Eric Young, 2b: Will start at second if Murphy plays first. Otherwise, it is left field or the bench.

Ruben Tejada, ss: Where’s Wilmer Flores? Mets are still looking to upgrade here. If he starts, he won’t bat second.

David Wright, 3b: The best hitter always bats third. Has been a quiet spring for him.

Curtis Granderson, rf: Has shown some pop in his bat.

Chris Young, lf: Slotted fifth between lefthanded hitters Granderson and Davis.

Ike Davis, 1b: He has little more than a week to get ready.

Travis d’Arnaud, c:  A lot is expected from him this year, not the least is for him to stay healthy.

Zack Wheeler, rhp: Batting eighth in the gimmick move.

Juan Lagares, cf: Great glove, but what does it say about him that he’s hitting ninth?

 

Mar 19

Mets Playing Unreasonable Hardball With Harvey

The New York Mets have long been accused of mishandling injuries, from Carlos Beltran to Ryan Church to David Wright to Oliver Perez to Ike Davis.

That’s only a few.

HARVEY: Irritated by Mets' position. (AP)

HARVEY: Irritated by Mets’ position. (AP)

Mishandling ranges across a broad spectrum and you can see storm clouds forming with Matt Harvey.

A few weeks ago, I took Harvey to task for his adamant stance of wanting to rehab in New York instead of Port St. Lucie. I’ve softened on that approach following the incident stemming from a one-on-one interview the disabled pitcher had with Andy Martino of The New York Daily News.

Harvey has the union-negotiated right not to rehab the entire time in Florida, which is the Mets’ preference. Harvey prefers New York, and insists it’s not because of the Rangers and the nightlife the City offers.

By contrast, Port St. Lucie offers Chili’s and an Outback. You can’t even get a good pizza slice down there.

Harvey fully argued his position, and I better understand his desire and frustration, a product of his treatment by management.

“The biggest part is wanting to stay with the team,’’ Harvey said. “To learn the league. To learn Travis (d’Arnaud).  To learn how to bond with the other starting pitchers, and the guys in the clubhouse, and the David Wrights who I plan on playing with.

“I expressed that seven months in Port St. Lucie is a long time. For me, I strongly felt that my best opportunity, and my motivation to come back quicker, stronger, work harder would be to be with the teammates. That’s kind of what I have always said.  I have worked so hard to get to the big leagues and be with this team, it just felt like all of a sudden I was shooed to the back.’’

Unfortunately, it’s usually that way with injured players; they become invisible.

But, Harvey makes sense. In contrast, the Mets have not responded with a passionate defense of their position, other than to say most players have always rehabbed at the spring training site.

That’s like a kid questioning his mother and hearing,  “because I said so.’’ That answer doesn’t fly when one is eight, let alone 24.

General manager Sandy Alderson said the team would discuss a full rehab plan. Huh? He says that in March? This should have been decided in late October following Harvey’s Tommy John surgery.

Why did this issue have to be in the air for the better part of five months? Ridiculous.

Funny, but when Harvey was introduced as the GM, COO Jeff Wilpon said better handling of injuries was a priority.

Why can’t there be a compromise? Say, one month in New York and one month in Florida? Or, rehab when the team is home and return to Port St. Lucie when it is on the road?

Think of the frequent flier miles. This shouldn’t be all that hard.

Harvey also complained his locker was moved – along with Jeremy Hefner – to the corner of the room, which he said isolates him from the team. He is the Mets, or at least will be next season, so why agitate him?

Alderson claimed he didn’t order the move; instead saying it was the decision of the clubhouse manager. Since when does a clubhouse manager run things?

Harvey should have said something a month ago if he was unhappy. If he did, there’s no excuse why this has lingered when he should have been relocated to his original locker location. The same goes for Hefner. There’s not a good reason to do this and alienate Harvey.

Harvey was also peeved, and rightfully so, when his interview with Martino was intruded on by a Mets’ official. Not being allowed to talk with the press is unreasonable. Just as bad is having his discussion monitored.

That the official also lingered after Harvey said everything was cool, and had a testy exchange with the reporter, not surprisingly reached print to further make the Mets look bad.

On interviews, Alderson said: “My recommendation is to manage doing interviews in a way that doesn’t interfere with his day-to-day-activities.’’

That’s absurd. Players always do that. In over 20 years in major league clubhouses, I never experienced a player who didn’t leave when he was scheduled to be somewhere else. “I gotta go. Let’s finish this later,’’ is the stock statement.

Besides, Harvey’s work ethic would never prevent him from doing his rehab. He probably has his day structured tighter than the Mets’ format.

So, the player who wasn’t supposed to be a story became one because of three decisions, or indecisions, by Mets’ management.

The first thing I thought of is why would the Mets push Harvey when all of this could have been alleviated with a little common sense? Why irritate your best pitcher, the guy you’ve been touting as the key to your rebuilding process?

Just plain dumb.

This is so petty. Don’t think for a moment that if the Mets continue to play hardball with Harvey, that he won’t do the same with them in 2019, when he becomes a free agent.

Mar 19

Mets Today: Goin’ Fishing

Today is one of the most anticipated days of spring training for the New York Mets. It is their off day, which means they can sleep in, play golf, take in a movie, go out to lunch and dinner.

Outside of those needing treatment – hello Ike Davis and Lucas Duda – a few pitchers might throw to maintain their routines.

Other than that, the Mets’ complex will be closed.

Davis and Duda will assuredly receive treatment because manager Terry Collins said either could play in Thursday’s exhibition game against Atlanta.

Neither player has run in minor league and intrasquad games. They have only run in conditioning drills.

Collins announced his rotation following the off day:

Thursday vs. Atlanta: Zack Wheeler.

Friday vs. Minnesota: Dillon Gee

Saturday vs. Miami: Bartolo Colon

Sunday (split squads) vs. Atlanta and Washington: Jenrry Mejia and John Lannan, respectively.

Monday vs. St. Louis: Daisuke Matsuzaka

Mar 18

Mets Wrap: Syndergaard Optioned; Davis Being Shopped

With the parting words, “we’ll see you soon,’’ the New York Mets optioned their best pitching prospect, Noah Syndergaard, to Triple-A Las Vegas.

mets-matters logoSyndergaard anticipated the move, but admitted to being disappointed nonetheless.

“It’s always disappointing when you get a taste of being in the big-league clubhouse, getting the treatment like a big leaguer gets, and then you’ve got to go back over to the minor-league side where things aren’t so glamorous. So that’s kind of disappointing,’’ Syndergaard told reporters. “But I kind of knew it was coming.’’

In addition today:

* GM Sandy Alderson, who was rebuffed this winter in attempts to deal Ike Davis, is working the phones again in search of a partner. ESPN reports Houston needs a first baseman. Davis hasn’t played in an exhibition game in over two weeks. The Mets will also explore a trade with Lucas Duda.

Davis went 1-for-7 with two strikeouts and Lucas Duda went 1-for-4 with a homer and two walks in minor league intrasquad games.

Davis ran the bases before the game and Duda ran in conditioning drills. Neither ran in the game, which is the deciding factor in being ready for the season.

* It wasn’t a good start for likely fifth starter Daisuke Matszaka gave up four runs on seven hits – including two homers – in five innings, but the Mets rallied to beat Detroit, 5-4,

* Wilmer Flores started at shortstop today, and is expected to play there if optioned to Triple-A Las Vegas.

* The Mets optioned pitchers Rafael Montero, Cory Mazzoni, Ryan Reid and Joel Carreno, catcher Juan Centeno and first basemen Brandon Allen and Matt Clark.

Mar 18

This Is What The Mets Should Do Immediately

There’s a distinction between ideal and reality for the New York Mets. Ideally, they’d like a healthy Ike Davis or Lucas Duda at first base, to hit 30 home runs and build a consistent attack around them.

However, reality has the Mets – according to ESPN – still trying to deal Davis, and both with nagging leg injuries.

DAVIS:  Time to think DL. (AP)

DAVIS: Time to think DL. (AP)

Neither had significant time this spring and are not running. With Opening Day less than two weeks away, they won’t get the time needed and quite possibly be healed.

That leads us to the reality, and it is harsh.

GM Sandy Alderson is dreaming if he believes he can deal Davis now. Alderson’s bargaining power is even less than it was during the winter.

Davis is hard to move because of his recent production and health issues. He’s even harder now with a nothing spring training. The best option with Davis is for him to open the season on the disabled list and just get well.

The same goes for Duda. Nobody expects anything from either, so let’s move on. Do it now and give what is suggested a time to jell.

Putting Davis on the disabled list is the lead domino, because other moves will follow, and there’s precious little time remaining to get cohesive.

They begin with moving Daniel Murphy, who has the experience, to first base. I previously suggest this spring to use Wilmer Flores because he can play the infield corners, but force-feeding him another position could backfire.

Of course, first base is a power position and Murphy won’t give much. Then again, how much power have they been given by Davis and Duda? I’d rather have Murphy’s .285 average and unimpressive on-base percentage than Davis’ .205 average and thundering nine homers.

With Murphy at first, Eric Young can be moved from left field to second base.

I always wanted Young in the starting lineup because I believe he helps the Mets more offensively in the leadoff position than Juan Lagares would defensively in center field.

This enables the Mets to give Lagares at-bats on the major league level instead of at Triple-A Las Vegas.

There are potential glitches, but it at least keeps the Mets afloat.