Jun 22

Mets Chat Room: Dickey vs. Athletics

Flashback to last week and that crushing loss in Atlanta when Francisco Rodriguez coughed up the lead in the ninth and D.J. Carrasco balked in the winning run?

DICKEY: Tries to break Mets' slide tonight.

Well, of course you do. Evidently, so do the Mets, who have lost three of four since. It was suggested at the time how important it was for the Mets to rebound and but the loss behind them.

Obviously, they haven’t.

R.A. Dickey goes tonight for the Mets. Last season’s surprise is floundering at 3-7. Sure, he’s lost a few he could have won, but he’s been inconsistent with command of his knuckleball, a hard pitch to control to begin with.

Dickey gave up six runs in his previous start, last Thursday at Atlanta, a game in which the Mets rallied to take the lead, but blew it in the late innings.

Cooling off is Jose Reyes, who is on a 2-for-19 slide during this stretch of interleague play. Not surprising, the only game in which he got a hit the Mets won.

However, Jason Bay might be warming up, going 10-for-24 over the past six games, including a homer and triple last night.

If you’d like to talk during tonight’s game, log in to the chat room on your left.

 

Jun 22

Surgery should come sooner than later for Davis.

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: Ike Davis is expected back in two weeks.

That was mid-May.

DAVIS: News not good.

The news isn’t good for Davis, whom GM Sandy Alderson said could require season-ending surgery after a MRI today revealed cartilage damage along with the bone bruise.

Davis had been wearing a protective boot, and the hope is the blood flow in his leg will improve enough to allow him to start running in three weeks. If he can’t, then he’ll undergo surgery.

Davis told ESPN: “Obviously surgery is an athlete’s nightmare, but I’ve had one surgery on my wrist and it worked out really well and it came back better than I was before.

“If it’s going to get me on the field again, obviously that’s something we have to do. But, obviously, we’re going to get a second opinion and see if everything coincides with everything everyone says, and hopefully in three weeks I’m starting to run again.’’

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Jun 22

Poll: What should the Mets do with Carlos Beltran?

I’ve added a poll on what the Mets should do with Carlos Beltran. Your votes and comments would be greatly appreciated.

Should they:

1. Keep him and make a long-shot run at the postseason, even if it means not receiving any draft picks when he inevitably signs elsewhere as a free agent?

2. Trade him for whatever they can get and save some salary, even if that’s a white flag on the season?

3. And, the long shot of the all, re-sign him to an extension now. Figuring his agent is Scott Boras, he’ll probably ask for three years.

Thanks.

 

 

 

Jun 22

Today in Mets’ History: Franco climbs save list.

John Franco has always been one of the more popular Mets. You can catch him on SNY from time to time.

FRANCO: Hall worthy?

On this date in 1994, Franco passed Dave Righetti for the most saves by a lefthander with 253 in a 5-2 victory at Atlanta.

Franco finished with 424 saves, an average of 26 per season playing for the Reds, Mets an Astros. He had eight seasons of 30 or more saves – five of them with the Mets – with a career best 39 with Cincinnati in 1988.

That season was one of three times in which he led the National League in saves.

Franco is fourth on the career list behind Trevor Hoffman, Mariano Rivera and Lee Smith, but has received little consideration for the Hall of Fame, largely because he has one save in 15 postseason appearances.

Franco has always been a straight shooter, which accounts for much of his popularity among Mets fans.

During the summer of 2009 when the Mets were hit hard by injuries and struggling, Franco wanted to hear none of the excuses and pointed in a different direction.

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Jun 21

Examining potential Beltran trade.

BELTRAN: Trade deadline approaching.

The question doesn’t appear to be “if,’’ but “when,’’ the Mets will deal outfielder Carlos Beltran.

The physical questions that followed him into the season have seemingly been answered in the positive, which means the Mets don’t have to think solely about dealing with the American League, although there are several interesting possibilities, including Boston, Chicago and Detroit.

The Red Sox could have inside leverage because executive Allard Baird – who interviewed for the Mets’ GM job – was the general manager at Kansas City when Beltran played there. That could help in Beltran waiving his no-trade clause.

In the National League, San Francisco needs offense, as does St. Louis with Albert Pujols injured and out from four to six weeks. Lance Berkman could move to first base to replace Pujols and make room for Beltran in right field.

To move Beltran, the Mets figure to eat a portion of his $18.5 million contract. How much they digest could make it substantially easier to move him. Unless they decide to make a serious run at a wild card – which would have to mean adding players instead of subtracting them – it does the Mets no good to keep Beltran because they would not receive compensatory draft picks as he is not arbitration eligible.

As badly as the Mets want to save salary and add prospects, don’t look for a crosstown move to the Yankees for two reasons, 1) the Yankees’ priority is pitching, and 2) there should be no inclination on the Mets’ part to aid the Yankees.

Should GM Sandy Alderson trade him to the Yankees, it would clearly indicate he doesn’t have a grasp on the lay of the land in New York. The Mets are struggling, both on the field and financially, and the last thing they need is to trade a key player that could put the Yankees over the top.

A trading of Beltran would raise a white flag of sorts, but don’t trade him to a prime antagonist.