Nov 03

Hamels: What was he really saying?

I’ll be honest, there are some in the media who take a quote and run with it without dissecting what was really said. There’s more to a quote than just words. There is context, and that must be part of the equation.

HAMELS: Has had better times.

HAMELS: Has had better times.

The media likes Cole Hamels because he’s a good quote. He says what’s on his mind without always using a filter. Nobody will ever forget his Mets as “chokers,” comment last winter on WFAN.

After he was ripped in Game 3, Hamels went on a radio show and spoke of his miserable season. Last year’s World Series MVP isn’t having it so good these days and it’s not a given he will start a possible Game 7, despite it being his turn.

Hamels was 10-11 this season, and is 0-1 with a 7.58 ERA in four starts in the playoffs. The Yankees got him for five runs in Game 3.

It was obvious to me what his meaning was when he said: “I can’t wait for it to end. It’s been mentally draining. At year’s end, you just can’t wait for a fresh start.”

However, Hamels will look at this season through a different set of glasses if he pitches, and wins, Game 7. I don’t see how anybody, including his teammate Brett Myers, could think he was saying he didn’t want the ball one more time.

I can’t imagine anybody believing Hamels saying he was quitting.

After all this, I would think Manuel would want to start Hamels, who would take to the mound with anger and added incentive.

Nov 03

About Last Night: We have a Series.

There’s a chance I could get my wish and this thing will go seven games. Those that know me understand that the only rooting interest I have is for a playoff round go seven games.

UTLEY: Two more bombs last night.

UTLEY: Two more bombs last night.

Last night was about the resiliency of the Phillies which was something the Mets have seen the last three seasons. With the benefit of 20/20 hindsight, a play here or there the other way and the Phillies could have won already as they held leads in the games they lost.

The Yankees got to Cliff Lee for five runs, but it took them until the eighth to do it. We could see him again in Game 7 as a reliever, as that is his throw day. Lee has thrown well north of 200 innings this season and maybe they are catching up to him. The Phillies won because he pitched deep into the game to keep the Yankees out of their bullpen.

Last night, we also saw Chase Utley, who I’ve said several times throughout the season that he’s one of the top position players in the game. If I were starting a team, Albert Pujols would be my first choice and Utley probably my second. Maybe A-Rod.

I’m looking forward to Game 6, which is often the most intense of the playoff games because of the sense of urgency. The key tomorrow night will be Andy Pettitte, who has pitched well this postseason, but not well over his career on three days rest.

Joe Girardi gambled by going with a three-man rotation. It could still work out for the Yankees, but Burnett was hammered and Pettitte has a losing record on three days.

Nov 01

Is there a real option in left?

The two most intriguing left-field names are Jason Bay and Matt Holliday, and I’m not high of the Mets getting either. Less desirous names are Vernon Wells and Milton Bradley. Both would be a mistake.

Amid reports Boston is offering Bay $60 million over four years, one would think he’ll stay with the Red Sox. Holliday would want more, and with Albert Pujols saying he wants to remain with the Cardinals, that is contingent on being surrounded with support. That Holliday is gone from St. Louis could be a premature assumption.

F-MART: Is it time for him?

F-MART: Is it time for him?

Wells is a bad idea considering his numbers are in decline and he has five years remaining on his contract for $98.5 million. If the Mets are willing to spend that much, I’d go for Holliday, but that’s too rich for my blood.

Bradley’s contract calls for two years and $21.5 million, which would be reasonable if he weren’t such a head case and clubhouse cancer. There’s a

Tampa Bay’s Carl Crawford and Pat Burrell, and the Angels’ Gary Matthews Jr. remain options. I’m on board for exploring Crawford, but I’m also beginning to wonder if giving the position to Fernando Martinez would be reasonable.

BRADLEY: Just say no.

BRADLEY: Just say no.

Reportedly, he’s not ready, but why not push the envelope with him? Say give him until the All-Star break and see where he is? Could that really hurt him?

Yes, the Mets have been accused of rushing players, and Mike Pelfrey and Lastings Milledge are two examples. But, if the Mets don’t seriously upgrade their rotation they aren’t going anywhere anyway.

So, maybe it is time for them to see what they have in Martinez?

Oct 31

Crawford could be available ….

In this lusting over Matt Holliday, who could still stay in St. Louis as Albert Pujols desires, let’s not forget Tampa Bay’s Carl Crawford, whose speed skills would come into play in every aspect of the game.

CRAWFORD: Good glove in left; solid bat.

CRAWFORD: Good glove in left; solid bat.

Crawford has a $10 million option for 2010 with a $1.25 million buyout. That’s reasonable, so the assumption must be made they way to get him would be in a trade. The Rays, like everybody else, want young talent. Would you be surprised to see them ask for Fernando Martinez? I wouldn’t, as everybody asks for him.

That’s a tough call, but Crawford’s production (four 50-steal seasons and six years with 180 hits) is what the Mets would hope for from Martinez.

I like Crawford for his speed, defense and ability to be a table setter on offense. There’s no question he plugs the left field hole, and he, Reyes, and Carlos Beltran bunched at the top of the order will create many RBI opportunities for Beltran, David Wright and Jeff Francoeur.

No, he doesn’t have the power potential of Holliday, but he helps the Mets in other areas. He’s not going to be a one-year pick-up, either. So, if the Mets could obtain Crawford without giving up Martinez, then having him would give the team the flexibility to deal him for pitching or power.

Oct 30

Thoughts on Pedro the teacher ….

Watching Pedro Martinez last night got me to thinking about his tenure with the Mets. He was brought in for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is his supposed influence on the younger pitchers. Mike Pelfrey, Oliver Perez and John Maine all have physical skills to be good, but something is lacking.

1 + 1 = 3 to some Mets pitchers.

1 + 1 = 3 to some Mets pitchers.

I know Martinez worked hard with Perez, as has Johan Santana the past two seasons, but nothing has sunk in. At least it sure doesn’t look like it. If you can’t learn from those two, who can you learn from? In this case, I’m more inclined to think the student has a learning disability than I am a problem with the teachers.

I’m not sure Perez is ever going to get it. I’d like to unload his contract, but who would be crazy enough to pay him that much money? Ooops, never mind.

Pelfrey’s erratic nature has me leaning in that direction, too. In comparison to some of the other young pitchers in the game, Pelfrey is way behind in his mound make-up. All too often this season Pelfrey unraveled after several good innings. He doesn’t have the ability to command his secondary pitches and adjust under pressure.

Of the three, Maine appears to me to have taken a step back from his 15-win season, but that’s more attributable to injuries than anything else.