Nov 29

So glad Evans is gone.

The Pittsburgh Pirates signed outfielder Nick Evans, presumably giving him a legitimate opportunity to play full time in the major leagues, something he never would have received had he stayed with the Mets.

I always liked Evans for his hustle, enthusiasm and willingness to do whatever it took to help the Mets. Too bad his hustle didn’t rub off on others.

I remembered Evans’ three-double debut at Colorado and how personable he was in answering questions. Good or bad, Evans never hid from the questioning. Again, another quality I wish others had followed.

When you cover the major league for an extended period, you begin to root for good things to happen to good people. Evans is a good guy and I hope he plays well in Pittsburgh.

My best to him.

Nov 29

Broxton off the board

The Kansas City Royals beat the Mets for Dodgers; reliever Jonathan Broxton, signing him to a one year deal worh $4 million. Supposedly, that was within the Mets’ spending paramenters.

Broxton worked all of 12 innings last year, so $4 million might have been a stretch for him. But, that’s where we’re at with the Mets and their bullpen.

Nov 29

I can hardly contain myself.

Read the news today about how the Mets could be players for 38-year-old reliever Octavio Dotel. A journeyman of all journeymen pitchers who has pitched for a dozen teams, including once the Mets.

If the Mets were a contending team with a deep bullpen, Dotel might have been a good fit. But, they aren’t a contender and their bullpen is shoddy at best and Dotel is nothing more than a bit part.

Surely, the Mets can scoop something off the reliever garbage heap that Dotal.

Also a bit of interesting news is that Pat Misch signed with Philadelphia. There was somebody always better – and that’s a relative term when it comes to the Mets’ rotation – but Misch always gave a solid effort and usually strong innings whenever given the chance.

Nov 25

Slow developing market for Reyes.

On the biggest shopping day of the year, the Mets are home wondering what to do with their leftovers.

When I read the Kansas City Royals could offer Bruce Chen $9 million, I begin to wonder if it worth being patient. Then I realize there is no other alternative. Jose Reyes could very well get his $100 million, but he won’t get it from the Mets.

The Mets’ stance of letting the market develop for Reyes before jumping in seems to be the philosophy of everybody else. The Marlins were the first one in, and they gave him a relatively low offer compared to what he’s expecting.

The Mets’ well-founded cautious take because of his injury history is also the thinking of everybody else. Rightfully so. This is not a knock on Reyes, but a statement of fact on the situation.

The offers will increase the closer we get to the Winter Meetings, and the Mets will undoubtedly make their tidy “well we gave him a fair proposal“ contract designed for show.

And, the Mets will be right. It would have been a fair proposal. But, when it comes to free agency, fair has nothing to do with it.

 

Nov 23

2011 Player Review: Justin Turner

JUSTIN TURNER

THE SKINNY: With second base a black hole last season when Brad Emaus didn’t make it and Daniel Murphy was hurt, Turner played more than anticipated. His playing time also increased when Jose Reyes twice went on the disabled list and Tejada played shortstop.

PRE-SEASON EXPECTATIONS: In the minor leagues, where he had been since 2006 with the Cincinnati and Baltimore organizations. The Mets would keep an eye on him because of his ability to play multiple positions (second, third and shortstop).

HOW THE SEASON PLAYED OUT: Turner quickly got his opportunity with the Mets and made the most of it with his hustle, timely hitting and defensive versatility. However, just because Turner can play multiple positions doesn’t mean he can play them all well as 12 errors indicates.

JOHN’S TAKE: Murphy is the better hitter and should get the first chance at second base, assuming Reyes leaves and Tejada takes over shortstop. The Mets will need bench players and it is better to stay with Turner than take somebody else’s reject off the waiver wire this winter.

JOE’S TAKE: Ultimately I don’t see Justin Turner as an everyday player. With sporadic playing time Turner was a hitting machine at the plate. He had a drive and intensity that almost made him an intimidating presence at the plate, and his focus and approach at the plate were spot on. But when he got regular playing time the results suffered which was a shame. I’ll tell you one thing though about this kid, there’s no Mets player including David Wright, that I’d want up at the plate with runners on base. Turner may be the best situational hitter on the team, and his presence on the bench is a big plus for the Mets.