Jun 28

Are the Mets’ handling Niese’s heart condition properly?

Just when the Mets start feeling good about themselves again, something happens that makes you scratch your head and wonder: “Can’t these guys use common sense for once when it comes to injuries?’’

NIESE: Where's the common sense?

A franchise notorious for mishandling injuries, they are raising concerns for how they are dealing with Jon Niese’s rapid heart beat.

Niese had a rapid heart beat pitching Saturday in Texas, and amazingly was allowed to stay in to face one more batter.

Niese was examined by a Rangers doctor, who didn’t find anything imminently concerning, but the Mets are waiting today for him to get an intensive medical exam with the team in Detroit.

Not only was Niese permitted to fly to Detroit from Dallas, but also to drive two hours to his off-season home in Ohio.

We could go on for hours about how the Mets have mishandled injuries, but in dealing with a heart issue, doesn’t it make sense to address it immediately?

Obviously, the Mets don’t consider the exam by the Rangers’ team physician all-inclusive, otherwise they wouldn’t be having him tested again. The odds are likely in Niese’s favor, but why take the chance?

There’s nothing to be gained by waiting and everything to lose. The new regime was supposed to handle things differently when it came to injuries, but that doesn’t appear to be the case.

Questions were asked after David Wright was allowed to play a month with back soreness that turned out to be a stress fracture. And, Ike Davis was supposed to be back in two weeks after an ankle sprain, but he could be out the rest of the season.

Waiting makes no sense. None.

Jun 28

Today in Mets’ History: Casey says good-bye.

Did you know Casey Stengel was the first player to hit a World Series home run at Yankee Stadium?

And, on this date in 1975, he made his final appearance at Shea Stadium at an Old Timers Game. He died several months later.

STENGEL: An original.

 

 

Charles Dillon Stengel, nicknamed Casey, which came from the initials of his hometown of Kansas City, Mo., was not only the first manager of the Mets, but a baseball original, an icon.

Stengel was an average, but not spectacular player for the Brooklyn Dodgers – starting his career in 1912, the year the Titanic sunk – Pirates, Phillies, Giants and Boston Braves.

Of his career as a player, Stengel said: “I had many years that I was not so successful as a ballplayer, as it is a game of skill.’’

Stengel carved his niche as a Hall of Famer managing the Dodgers, Boston Braves, Yankees, and, of course, the Mets, where he became a folk hero.

Stengel won ten pennants and seven World Series titles for the Yankees, including a record five straight from 1949-53. He was fired after the 1960 World Series, in which the Yankees lost to Pittsburgh in seven games. Stengel insisted it was age related after turning 70, and said, “I’ll never make that mistake again.’’

Stengel was talked of retirement to manage the expansion Mets in 1962, and when he was hired, said: “It’s a great honor to be joining the Knickerbockers.’’

The Mets finished last in his four years with them.

Continue reading

Jun 27

Today in Mets’ History: Anthony Young loses again.

YOUNG: The losing never seemed to stop.

Futility is often a word linked to the Mets, and who dealt with it more than Anthony Young who lost 27 consecutive decisions, including No. 24 on this date in 1993, losing 5-3 to St. Louis.

From April 14, 1992 while with the Mets, until May 1, 1994, then with the Chicago Cubs, Young lost 27 straight decisions.

That stretch including 13 quality starts, defined as giving up three runs in at least six innings.

Young finished retired in 1996, last pitching for Houston, with a 15-48 record, but a decent 3.89 ERA.

Do you remember Young and that stretch? If so, please post your thoughts.

YOUNG’S CAREER

 

 

Jun 27

Mets Take Series With 8-5 Win Over Rangers

Dillon Gee pitched around some early inning trouble, and the offense put up enough runs to put the game out of reach as the Mets won the game, 8-5 and the series versus the Rangers

Game Notes

Dillon Gee was effective, if not spectacular in his six innings of work today. He allowed three runs on eight hits, walking two and striking out one while allowing one HR. Gee looked to be doomed in the first inning, giving up numerous hits. He settled down and looked very good in the later innings for the most part. He hasn’t shown that good control recently, and thus has been getting hit because he cannot locate.

Four of the bullpen boys came out today. Beato went an clean inning, Byrdak a clean two-thirds, Izzy a clean one-third and K-Rod came out in a game that was five runs ahead and managed to make it only a three run win. K-Rod has consistently looked…bad. It isn’t a matter of pitching himself in and out of trouble now. He is walking batters, giving up extra base hits and being forced into situations. His ineptitude to “close” also hurts some of his trade value.

The offense today existed thanks to major Ranger errors. The first run scored on a wild pitch, the second on an error and the fourth and fifth on a failed “intentional walk”. Its good to see the Mets winning with some timely hitting and aggressive baserunning, but at what point will the lack of any power create problems?

Jason Bay – 0 for 5 with an RBI and a strikeout. 51 K’s in 187 AB’s. Eek.

Daniel Murphy – 3 for 4 with two runs and an RBI. Also, caught stealing. Great to see Daniel put up some hits.

Ronny Paulino – 2 for 4 with two runs. He may not be hitting the lefties for power right now, but he is hitting them. Much more then can be said about..

Scott Hairston – 1 for 5 with a strikeout. Hairston only hit wasn’t hit very hard. How much longer is he the acceptable fifth OF?

Turning Point

Mets second inning after Gee gave up two runs. It just gave Dillon confidence to know he wasn’t going to have to win the game, he just couldn’t give it away.

Game Ball

Jose Reyes – 4 for 5 with three runs, an RBI and an SB. Honestly, he slumps for three games and does this. If thats how long he will slump for, opponents will begin walking Jose.

On Deck

The Mets have off tomorrow, and then will face off against the Detroit Tigers on Tuesday in Detroit. R.A. Dickey will toe the rubber against the Tigers Rick Porcello. Game Time is 7:05 P.M.

To read my thoughts on this game and the Mets in general, follow me on twitter @TheSeanKenny

Jun 26

Today in Mets’ History: Looking at Rusty Staub.

Rusty Staub was one of the good guys in Mets’ history, not to mention one of their better players. Who can forget him playing the 1973 World Series with basically one arm?

STAUB: Pinch-hitter delux

Staub developed into one of the game’s great pinch-hitters. On this date in 1983, Staub tied Dave Philley’s then major league record  with his eighth consecutive pinch-hit in the first game of a doubleheader against Philadelphia.

Staub played 23 seasons in the major leagues, including nine with the Mets. He broke in with Houston in 1963 – the Astros’ second year of existence – then played with Montreal (1969-71); the Mets (1972-75); Detroit (1976-79), where he had three of his best seasons; another brief stint with the Expos at the end of the 1979 season; Texas in 1980; and finally five more years with the Mets.

Staub finished with 2,716 hits and 292 homers.

After his career, Staub worked on Mets’ telecasts, then own and operated two restaurants in Manhattan. He is a chef and wine connoisseur.

The Expos retired Staub’s No. 10 in 1993.

STAUB CAREER