Jun 27

Today in Mets’ History: Anthony Young loses again.

YOUNG: The losing never seemed to stop.

Futility is often a word linked to the Mets, and who dealt with it more than Anthony Young who lost 27 consecutive decisions, including No. 24 on this date in 1993, losing 5-3 to St. Louis.

From April 14, 1992 while with the Mets, until May 1, 1994, then with the Chicago Cubs, Young lost 27 straight decisions.

That stretch including 13 quality starts, defined as giving up three runs in at least six innings.

Young finished retired in 1996, last pitching for Houston, with a 15-48 record, but a decent 3.89 ERA.

Do you remember Young and that stretch? If so, please post your thoughts.

YOUNG’S CAREER

 

 

Jun 27

Mets Take Series With 8-5 Win Over Rangers

Dillon Gee pitched around some early inning trouble, and the offense put up enough runs to put the game out of reach as the Mets won the game, 8-5 and the series versus the Rangers

Game Notes

Dillon Gee was effective, if not spectacular in his six innings of work today. He allowed three runs on eight hits, walking two and striking out one while allowing one HR. Gee looked to be doomed in the first inning, giving up numerous hits. He settled down and looked very good in the later innings for the most part. He hasn’t shown that good control recently, and thus has been getting hit because he cannot locate.

Four of the bullpen boys came out today. Beato went an clean inning, Byrdak a clean two-thirds, Izzy a clean one-third and K-Rod came out in a game that was five runs ahead and managed to make it only a three run win. K-Rod has consistently looked…bad. It isn’t a matter of pitching himself in and out of trouble now. He is walking batters, giving up extra base hits and being forced into situations. His ineptitude to “close” also hurts some of his trade value.

The offense today existed thanks to major Ranger errors. The first run scored on a wild pitch, the second on an error and the fourth and fifth on a failed “intentional walk”. Its good to see the Mets winning with some timely hitting and aggressive baserunning, but at what point will the lack of any power create problems?

Jason Bay – 0 for 5 with an RBI and a strikeout. 51 K’s in 187 AB’s. Eek.

Daniel Murphy – 3 for 4 with two runs and an RBI. Also, caught stealing. Great to see Daniel put up some hits.

Ronny Paulino – 2 for 4 with two runs. He may not be hitting the lefties for power right now, but he is hitting them. Much more then can be said about..

Scott Hairston – 1 for 5 with a strikeout. Hairston only hit wasn’t hit very hard. How much longer is he the acceptable fifth OF?

Turning Point

Mets second inning after Gee gave up two runs. It just gave Dillon confidence to know he wasn’t going to have to win the game, he just couldn’t give it away.

Game Ball

Jose Reyes – 4 for 5 with three runs, an RBI and an SB. Honestly, he slumps for three games and does this. If thats how long he will slump for, opponents will begin walking Jose.

On Deck

The Mets have off tomorrow, and then will face off against the Detroit Tigers on Tuesday in Detroit. R.A. Dickey will toe the rubber against the Tigers Rick Porcello. Game Time is 7:05 P.M.

To read my thoughts on this game and the Mets in general, follow me on twitter @TheSeanKenny

Jun 26

Today in Mets’ History: Looking at Rusty Staub.

Rusty Staub was one of the good guys in Mets’ history, not to mention one of their better players. Who can forget him playing the 1973 World Series with basically one arm?

STAUB: Pinch-hitter delux

Staub developed into one of the game’s great pinch-hitters. On this date in 1983, Staub tied Dave Philley’s then major league record  with his eighth consecutive pinch-hit in the first game of a doubleheader against Philadelphia.

Staub played 23 seasons in the major leagues, including nine with the Mets. He broke in with Houston in 1963 – the Astros’ second year of existence – then played with Montreal (1969-71); the Mets (1972-75); Detroit (1976-79), where he had three of his best seasons; another brief stint with the Expos at the end of the 1979 season; Texas in 1980; and finally five more years with the Mets.

Staub finished with 2,716 hits and 292 homers.

After his career, Staub worked on Mets’ telecasts, then own and operated two restaurants in Manhattan. He is a chef and wine connoisseur.

The Expos retired Staub’s No. 10 in 1993.

STAUB CAREER

Jun 25

Today in Mets’ History: Sid stars for ’86 powerhouse.

While the 1969 Mets gathered steam and rolled late in the second half, the 1986 team steamrolled the National League from start to finish as that team dominated as manager Davey Johnson projected.

FERNANDEZ: Had great stuff.

On this date in 1986, Sid Fernandez and Roger McDowell combined to stuff the Montreal Expos, 5-2, at Shea Stadium.

While Doc Gooden was the headliner, the 86 staff was solid with Ron Darling, Bob Ojeda, Fernandez and Rick Aguilera.

All but Aguilera made at least 30 starts with over 200 innings pitched. There were no 20-game winners on that staff, but six pitchers all won in double digits, including McDowell, who was 14-9 in relief with 22 saves and 128 innings pitched.

Fernandez was 16-6 that season, and all indications were he was going to be a special pitcher. In many ways, Fernandez personified the Mets from that era in that he had loads of talent, but never developed into a big winner.

Fernandez never won more than the 16 games that season and finished his career in 1997 at 114-96 in 15 years with the Mets, Dodgers, Orioles, Phillies and Astros.

FERNANDEZ CAREER

BOX SCORE

 

 

 

Jun 25

Texas Toast: Mets Fall To Rangers 8-1

Mike Pelfrey was hit hard early, but stabilized and Manny Acosta made sure the game was out of reach in the Mets 8-1 loss to the Rangers.

Game Notes

Mike Pelfrey went six innings, allowing four runs on eight hits, walking two and striking out three. Big Pelf gave up three of those runs in the first inning, and after that seemed to get his bearings and keep the Rangers to one run over the next five innings. As noticed, Pelfrey has allowed more HR this season then he has all last season, as evidenced by his love affair with his four-seam fastball. While this isn’t a horrible Pelfrey outing, giving up three in the first inning is a bit demoralizing.

Manny Acosta came out, decided that he likes allowing XBH to righties, specifically doubles and then home-runs to light-hitting utility men. Acosta went one and two-third innings, allowing four runs on five hits walking two and striking out one giving up two home runs. Acosta, for the most part has been atrocious this year. He has allowed more runs than innings pitched, and more hits while only striking out four. A trip to Buffalo seems in the cards, maybe upon the return of Taylor Buccholz. D.J. Carrasco got the last out of the eighth.

The offense was stifled by Matt Harrison, consistently struggling to make solid contact. Their only run was scored when Ronny Paulino doubled, advanced to third on a Daniel Murphy IF single and then scored on a Ruben Tejada single to center.

Jose Reyes – 0 for 3 with a walk. Grounded into a DP on a laser beam that Adrian Beltre ate up. Jose is beginning to hit the ball into the air a lot more, and that is when trouble ensues.

Scott Hairston – 0 for 3 – two fly outs (barely leaving the infield) and a tailor-made GIDP. With the Mets carrying six OF’s (Pridie, Pagan, Bay, Beltran, Harris, Hairston) how much longer until Hairston gets the axe?

Turning Point

Manny Acosta doing his best impersonation of a bad pitcher. Or, himself. Either/Or.

Game Ball

Jason Bay – 3 for 4 with a strikeout. They may be singles, but contact is contact. At some point, these singles may become doubles. Baby steps.

On Deck

The Mets will head into tomorrow to face Rangers righty Alexi Ogando and will send out Jon Niese. Game time is 4:10 PM. In other notes, I wonder how the Mets will respond to the intense Texas hit in the middle of the day.