Nov 06

Blog update ….

The World Series is over, so as promised I’ll be doing some things to improve the blog. I want to make it more visually appealing and also adding more in the terms of content.

As you see, today I was able to post a poll, of which there will be more of in the future. I’m also working on doing more writing and have more standard items, things you can expect to see on a regular basis.

I got some static during the World Series about writing on the Yankees. I want you to know during the Hot Stove season there might be posts that don’t always feature the Mets, but I will try to get a Met angle into the story.

There will also be an increase in links to other blogs, as well as links to other sites. Once a new feature is added I’ll have a post directing you to it.

I saw the numbers and they are improving. Considering I’m not affiliated with a media vehicle they are actually pretty decent. But, they can be better, which is why I won’t be complacent and try to improve as much as I can.

There is a core of followers to the blog, some from when I was working at that paper. Your input is always valuable. If you have suggestions and don’t want to post them, feel free to email me at jdelcos@yahoo.com.

Thank you very much for your continued support.

Best,

John

Nov 06

Taking a look at the Mets free agents

Mets Free Agents

Mets Free Agents

It was hardly a surprise Carlos Delgado and Brian Schneider filed for free agency yesterday, the first day of the 15-day filing period that began yesterday.

Delgado, who missed most of the season with a hip injury, expects to play next season, but won’t be re-signed by the Mets. Schneider could return to Washington.

DELGADO: Gone.

DELGADO: Gone.


Ironically, Schneider is a veteran back-up catcher, something the Mets need, but they want one who could hit.

Both are Class B free agents, meaning should they be offered arbitration and decline, then sign with somebody else, the Mets would be rewarded a draft pick from the Sandwich Round, which is between the first and second rounds. It’s a moot point, because they won’t be offered arbitration in fear they accept.

First base next year will be Daniel Murphy and a right-handed bat they sign on the cheap. It could be Fernando Tatis, who is also a free agent.

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Nov 05

In case you were wondering ….

The market for Matt Holliday will be expensive. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has reported the Cardinals are discussing a six-year, $96-million contract. If that’s the club’s starting point, you know it will only end up higher, especially with Scott Boras being his agent.

Holliday’s deal will end up north of $100 million, which I think is too rich for the Mets’ blood. That’s a lot of money, which could improve other areas of the team. As important as adding Holliday would be, the Mets could upgrade their pitching and add a lesser bat, which in the big picture would improve their situation.

Nov 05

About Last Night: Reflections on Mets vs. Yankees.

The Yankees are better than the Mets, I won’t insult you to suggest otherwise. But, that doesn’t mean the gap can’t close.

The Mets, when healthy, have talent, but truth be told probably more unrealized potential. When it comes to their abilities, they are an uncashed check.

Yes, yes, I know … the Yankees have the whole check book, but that’s not the point.
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Nov 04

Game 6: Where history is made.

Game 6 is more than a count of what has been played, more than a bookmark to the World Series. Game 6 has its own mystique. The most dramatic World Series usually go seven games, but it can’t get there without a Game 6.

Fisk's homer.

Fisk's homer.


One way or another, it ends after Game 7, which takes away part of the suspense. However, there’s a sense of urgency, of desperation, for the team behind entering Game 6.

It is why many of baseball’s most dramatic moments are born to that game. I’ve chosen five, with the criteria being I saw the game and it produced a seventh game.

One of baseball’s most enduring images, and perhaps its greatest game, came in the 1975 World Series on Carlton Fisk’s game-ending homer in the 12th inning as Boston beat Cincinnati, 7-6. Fisk’s homer was made possible by Bernie Carbo’s three-run, two-strike, pinch-hit game-tying homer in the eighth inning.

Fisk’s moment just delayed what Red Sox fans would call the inevitable, as Boston lost Game 7 at Fenway Park.

Buckner a picture of dejection.

Buckner a picture of dejection.


Another moment etched in time is the ball that got by by Bill Buckner in the 1986 World Series. Down to their last out, the Mets rallied for three runs to beat Boston, 6-5, with the game-winner coming on Mookie Wilson’s dribbler through Buckner’s legs.

The Mets went on to win Game 7, and overcame a three-run deficit to do it.

That game was made possible because the Mets prevailed against Houston over 16 innings in Game 6 of the NLCS. Keith Hernandez called it a crucial victory as it kept the Mets from facing Mike Scott, who beat them in Games 1 and 4.

This year’s playoffs have been marred by terrible umpiring, but one of the game’s most infamous calls came in the eighth inning of Game 6 of the 1985 World Series that might have kept St. Louis from winning. Facing elimination and down 1-0 going into the ninth inning, umpire Don Denkinger ruled Kansas City’s Jorge Orta safe at first on a play in which he was clearly out.

The Royals went on to win that game, 2-1, then rout the Cardinals, 11-0, in Game 7.

The Call.

The Call.


In Game 6 of the 1991 World Series, Minnesota’s Kirby Puckett’s 11th inning homer off Charlie Leibrandt kept the Twins alive, 4-3. They would win Game 7 on Jack Morris’ ten-inning shutout. single run, four games decided in the final at-bat and three games going into extra innings.

Often forgotten, perhaps because the game wasn’t decided on a game-ending hit, Anaheim rallied from five runs down in the seventh inning to beat San Francisco, 6-5. The Angels scored three in the seventh and three in the eighth to win, then won Game 7.

Another came in the 1971 World Series, when the Orioles, facing elimination, beat Pittsburgh, 3-2, in 10 innings on Brooks Robinson’s sacrifice fly.

I invite you to reflect on these moments and any other you might have about Game 6 in the World Series.