Mar 30

Bay to DL; Izzy stays.

Jason Bay returned to New York today to have his strained left rib cage examined and all indications are he’ll be placed on the disabled list. When manager Terry Collins said he’d rather lose Bay for a week rather than a month, how else can you read the tea leaves?

This is not an easy injury from which to recover, and even when he does return there’s no guarantee he’ll hit the ground running. And, he wasn’t exactly stroking the ball with power this spring. So, with Opening Day two days away the Mets have two significant power issues: Not having Bay at the start and concerns about Beltran’s health.

Meanwhile, Jason Isringhausen accepted the Mets’ decision to stay in Florida for an extended spring training. Odds are Isringhausen will be on the 25-man roster soon enough. Isringhausen had a good spring and his experience could be beneficial to a young bullpen.

Oh, a note that should make you crack a smile: The Phillies, who have a hole at second base with Chase Utley injured, waived Luis Castillo today.

 

 

Mar 29

Bay ailing … so what else is new?

Carlos Beltran is scheduled to play this afternoon, which could be a dicey gamble because if something happens they won’t be able to back date him the last ten days in spring training. What good is one game, say five innings in a Grapefruit League game going to do?

BAY: Not smiling now.

Not much. A tweak and he could be on the disabled list for at least two weeks into the season.

Right, I know what you’re thinking …. where he could join Jason Bay.

Bay was scratched from today’s game with pain in his rib cage. These things take time, so Bay going on the DL (it would be retroactive to March 24), isn’t out of the question. Considering these are the Mets it’s probably a certainty.

Nice timing on optioning Nick Evans, wouldn’t you say? It Bay goes on the DL Lucas Duda would open the season on the 25-man roster. So, on days when Beltran is off, we’ll have an outfield of Duda, Willie Harris and Scott Hairston. Kind of inspiring, wouldn’t you say?

Meanwhile, the Mets are trying to convince Jason Isringhausen to stay in Port St. Lucie for an extended spring training, which would allow them to keep Blaine Boyer. Isringhausen is 38 and has pitched well this spring. He might decide he doesn’t want to stay in Florida, and if so, somebody will claim him

In addition, Boyer has an out clause in his contract any might opt to hook on elsewhere. If they can pull this off and be able to keep both Isringhausen and Boyer it would be sweet, because you know they are going to need them eventually.

Mar 24

Alderson conference call

I just finished up a conference call with GM Sandy Alderson. Among the highlights:

* If the Mets were in contention at the trade deadline he would have the financial flexibility to add a player or pitcher.

* Alderson would like to see an improvement in Jose Reyes’ on-base percentage. He said Reyes’ performance, along with where the team is will be the key factors in a contract extension. If Reyes is performing well and the team is not, the Mets could still sign him to an extension. Alderson said the Mets would have the financial resources to extend Reyes.

* He said he is not concerned with Jason Bay’s lack of power during spring training and believes he will adjust to Citi Field this summer.

* Said Nick Evans is still in the mix to make the team, especially if Carlos Beltran starts the season on the disabled list.

* Is not surprised the second base decision is lasting this long.

 

 

Mar 22

No kudos for Alderson on Perez, Castillo.

Let’s be careful not to go overboard in praising the Sandy Alderson regime for the sacking of Luis Castillo and Oliver Perez. Credit to Alderson goes in finally convincing the Wilpons eating $18 million in salary was the prudent option.

The actual decision itself was a no-brainer in that neither would be a viable contributor to the team, both were an emotional and psychological drains in the clubhouse, and to adequately change the culture of the Mets they must be purged.

There was no real thinking that had to be done and the key was in the timing. Alderson knew he couldn’t trade either in the off-season because of their salary, performance and injury histories. His only hope for Castillo was he could find his game and prove enough in spring training to warrant going north; for Perez was he could regain his fastball and hook on in a relief role.

Both were long shots, but Alderson had no choice to bring them to spring training and let it play itself out.

Since neither distinguished himself in the positive, it was time to make the move. With Opening Day rapidly approaching and the Mets playing at a .500 pace and little room for optimism, Alderson needed to make a spark and this was it.

This was a move the Mets needed to make so let’s not throw roses at Alderson for doing the obvious.

Mar 21

Perez error over

GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins closed the door this morning on the Mets’ career of Oliver Perez, arguably one of the most scored players in franchise history when they released the frustratingly erratic pitcher known as Coin Flip.

There were no 50-50 odds on Perez when spring training began and giving up back-to-back homers in a relief outing over the weekend was the final image of him in a Mets’ uniform.

PEREZ: We rarely saw him celebrate.

Perez is now free to pass GO, collect $12 million and sign with any team for the major league minimum. For those counting at home, that would be an additional $414,500.

I don’t begrudge Perez the money like some. Afterall, nobody put a gun to then GM Omar MInaya and forced him to offer Perez that contract. What was Perez supposed to do, turn it down?

What annoys me most about Perez is not that he lost his fastball, or never had command. That happens. It’s part of baseball. What was most upsetting about the Perez era was how things were handled last season. Perez said frequently this spring he is trying to get better every time he pitches. It’s the proper thing to say, but rings hollow after last summer.

When it became clear he was losing it, Perez refused to take the minor league assignment that could have helped his mechanics. There was no guarantee, but he had a better chance working things out in the minors than by languishing in the bullpen by himself as the Mets played with a 24-man roster.

Just because it was Perez’s contractual right to refuse the assignment, it doesn’t make it the right thing to do. And, it certainly contradicted Perez’s statements on self-improvement.

The Perez saga paralyzed a reeling team and he became a symbol of all that was wrong and subsequently a pariah in the clubhouse. Nobody denied Perez put the effort in, but there was groaning about playing short and he deprived another player a chance to play. As the losses mounted, it was hard to find supporters in the clubhouse, especially after the bullpen coughed up another game.

Perez made Jerry Manuel’s job more difficult, and with the manager knowing he’d be fired, his parting gift to the Mets – and the fans who booed him – was to give them one last glimpse of the erratic left-hander who put himself ahead of the team. After barely pitching in the second half, there was little doubt he would give it up one more time, and it was symbolically fitting Perez would lose the final game of a lost season.

After Luis Castillo was given his release – he has since been signed by Philadelphia – Alderson said the decision in part was made by the negativity that swirled around him and his perception by Mets fans. The perception of Perez is far worse because the sum is greater and that he represents wasted potential and the disaster that has been the last three seasons.