Oct 29

It’s Official: Mets Name Agent Brodie Van Wagenen As New GM

The New York Mets are rebuilding again and in a most unusual way. The Mets announced today their next general manager will be Brodie Van Wagenen, who is the agent for Jacob deGrom and Yoenis Cespedes.

Van Wagenen, the son-in-law of the late astronaut Neil Armstrong, will be introduced Tuesday afternoon in a Citi Field press conference. Van Wagenen beat out former Texas and Milwaukee general manager Doug Melvin, and Tampa Bay senior vice president of baseball operations Chaim Bloom.

The Mets get points for creativity, but if this doesn’t work out there’s no telling how far back the organization will fall. Especially if things fall south with deGrom and Noah Syndergaard.

”Brodie is an extremely knowledgeable, creative, progressive and collaborative leader, who I’m confident will lead us toward sustainable success,” Mets COO Jeff Wilpon said in a statement released by the team. ”I’m very excited for our fans to hear and see the direction Brodie outlined for us.”

Wilpon’s father, Fred, was reportedly behind Melvin, but ultimately was sold on Van Wagenen, citing his character.

”Jeff brought forward an array of candidates and we all agreed that Brodie’s high character, blend of analytics, scouting and development ideas illustrate why he will be successful in this role,” Wilpon Sr., said.

Van Wagenen is an unknown commodity and admits this will be a challenge.

”I’m beyond excited and motivated to take on this new challenge,” said Van Wagenen, who has a reported four-year deal. ”I want to thank Fred and Jeff for believing in my vision and abilities. I look forward to beginning the progress of getting the Mets to contend for a championship year after year.”

Van Wagenen’s first challenge is to get the Wilpons to spend, notably on his former client, deGrom. During the All-Star break, Van Wagenen said the Mets should offer deGrom a pricey extension. Now, he’ll find himself sitting across the table with one of his former colleagues at the Creative Artists Agency (CAA) arguing against a landmark deal.

That change in Van Wagenen’s responsibilities at the negotiating table also raises the potential of a conflict of interest, and that concerns the Major League Baseball Players Association. 

”I won’t tell you how many calls or how many texts I have gotten,” MLBPA executive director Tony Clark said at the World Series over the weekend. ”I will simply suggest to you that our membership is paying attention.”

So are a lot of people in the industry as this is more than just hiring a new general manager, but the Mets taking a tremendous gamble.

 

Sep 26

DeGrom Makes His Final Cy Young Case

As he has been all summer, Jacob deGrom was simply brilliant tonight in his final start of what could be a Cy Young Award-winning season. Despite an alarming lack of run support, deGrom overcame frequent criticism for a lack of wins and said he coveted winning the annual pitching award.

“I don’t think it has set in yet,’’ deGrom said of his season which included beating the Braves tonight, 3-0, giving up only two hits and struck out ten to give him 1,000 so far in his young career.

In 32 starts, deGrom, 10-9, with a 1.70 ERA, 0.91 WHIP and 269 strikeouts. Perhaps, most impressive was that hitters batted .142 with RISP and he finished the season with 29 straight starts of giving up three runs or fewer. He gave up one or no runs in 18 starts.

“I try not to look at the numbers,’’ deGrom said. “I try to put this team in position to win. I am very happy with how the night went.’’

One pitch at a time is a standard cliché for pitchers, but deGrom said was his secret.

“In the past where I got in trouble it was because I thought too much,’’ deGrom said. “I’m not letting things get to me. I learned to not worry about things I can’t control. I wish I had more wins, but it is what it is.’’

HARVEY SHOWS TRUE COLORS … AGAIN: The Mets have moved on from Matt Harvey, but the team remains in the mind of the temperamental former starter.

Traded to Cincinnati earlier this season, Harvey will be a free agent after this season, and without mentioning “Mets,’’ when asked about this winter, said: “There’s only one team out there I would not sign with, that’s about it.”

He didn’t have to say what team.

Injuries and his late-night partying sabotaged Harvey’s tenure with the Mets. He didn’t help himself any when he feuded with management about injury rehab and was suspended last year for blowing off a game without permission.

Harvey further alienated himself with the Mets when he refused a minor league rehab assignment to work on his mechanics.

Harvey could draw some interest this winter, but he needn’t worry, the Mets have no thought of bringing him back.

WRIGHT WON’T PLAY AGAINST BRAVES: Third baseman David Wright has been activated but assistant general manager John Ricco said it is unlikely he will play against the Braves because they are trying to earn home-field advantage in the Division Series.

However, Ricco left open the possibility he could pinch-hit in a blowout game. He is expected in pinch-hit Friday against the Marlins.

“I hope to go out there and do something that doesn’t embarrass me, but it’s going to be difficult, not having an at-bat for a while,” Wright said.

Manager Mickey Callaway said Jose Reyes will start alongside Wright at shortstop Saturday.

“When I’m hurt, I never put my uniform on. I wear a hoodie or something like that,” he said. “So, to put that thing on again means the world to me, and is something that you tend to take for granted.

“I’m really nervous, I’ll tell you that. I’m really excited. Got the butterflies going. It’s going to be a weird, yet fulfilling feeling,” he said. “I want to put on as good a show as I possibly can — and at the same time soak it all in.”

Wright hasn’t played in the majors since May 27, 2016, due to the neck, back and shoulder injuries that required surgery. Last month, Wright batted .171 (7 for 41) with a double and two RBIs in 10 rehab games for Class A St. Lucie and two with Triple-A Las Vegas.

CALLAWAY COMING BACK: Ricco said he won’t be a candidate for the GM position next year, but indicated Callaway was likely to return next season as manager.

“I think what’s impressed me the most is for a rookie manager in New York, he’s got the team playing hard all the way down to the end,” Ricco said. “He’s really got a lot of guys trending in the right direction. The young guys are playing hard and winning games, and our pitching, we’ve seen guys take big steps forward.”

 

Sep 19

Mets Offense As Bad As The Numbers Say

The Mets were shut out for the 12th time this season tonight in Philadelphia, which along with injuries and their bullpen, accurately defines the Mets’ most serious deficiency this summer.

The offensive breakdowns can be attributed to injuries primarily to Jay Bruce, Yoenis Cespedes and Michael Conforto.

The rankings, for lack of a better word, are just ugly. With ten games remaining, they rank:

26th in runs scored with 646, with only the Padres, Giants and Marlins in the National League behind them.

27th in hits with 1,212, ahead of the Phillies, Diamondbacks and Padres.

18th in doubles with 246, 52 behind league leader Atlanta.

19th in homers with 164.

21st in RBI with 619.

12th highest with 1,301 strikeouts, which has long been a franchise problem.

22nd with 64 stolen bases.

28th in batting average at .236.

21st in on-base percentage at .312.

24th with a .704 OPS.

24th in total bases with 2,014.

19th in extra-base hits with 442.

It has been said you can make statistics say anything you want, but there’s no way you can make them say the Mets have had a good year at the plate.

WHEELER SHUTDOWN: As suggested here a few days ago, the Mets have shut down Zack Wheeler for the remainder of the season. Manager Mickey Callaway said Wheeler has nothing left to prove.

“We’re really excited about the year he had, and we feel like we’d probably be taking the best care of him we can if we shut him down at this point,” Callaway said.

Corey Oswalt will take Wheeler’s spot in the rotation, beginning Saturday in Washington.

Wheeler didn’t pitch in 2015-16 following Tommy John surgery and had last year cut short with stress on his arm. After a rocky start this year, he has a 9-1 record and 1.68 ERA in 11 starts in the second half.

“[My] body after this long is starting to wear down a little bit,” Wheeler said. “But if I really needed to for the playoff push or something, I could definitely go out there and finish it up. That’s not why I’m stopping. It’s just being smart, really.

“I’ve done some thinking, and I wish the first part of the season was more like the second part. Obviously, I think overall it was a good season for me. A bit of a learning experience at the beginning. I made some adjustments, and I was able to take off the second half.”

TEBOW TO RETURN: Tim Tebow is expected to return to the Mets organization in 2019.

Tebow underwent season-ending surgery on his right hand in July to repair a fractured hamate bone. In 84 games at Class AA Binghamton, Tebow hit .273 with six homers and 36 RBI and started as the DH in the Eastern League All-Star Game.

 

Sep 17

As Season Winds Down, Mets Should Consider Cutting Back On Pitchers

Jacob deGrom is competing for the Cy Young Award, so the Mets won’t limit him during his final two starts. However, they might ease up on the gas when it comes to the rest of their rotation.

However, Noah Syndergaard, Zack Wheeler and Steven Matz – all of whom have been injured – could benefit if their innings are reduced.

“We have to do everything can to make sure a June doesn’t happen again,” manager Mickey Callaway said of the Mets winning only five games in June. “Because it derails your whole season.”

Syndergaard has thrown 135.1 innings; Matz has thrown a career-high 140 innings; and with seven innings tonight in Philadelphia, Wheeler has logged 182.1 innings this season.

Wheeler, 12-7 with a 3.31 ERA and 1.12 WHIP, leads the majors with eight victories in the second half.

“He’s obviously had a great season, is in a very good spot health-wise right now, and we’re going to pay attention to him probably the most,” Callaway said.

That’s because Wheeler has had an extensive injury history, with Tommy John surgery keeping him out of the majors in 2015-16, and a stress reaction ending his 2017 season in July.

Wheeler needed to prove two things this season, 1) that he could stay healthy, and 2) that he could pitch up to his expectations. He’s done both, and with nothing else left to prove, it wouldn’t hurt for him to be shut down, or at least throw a minimum of five innings.

 

 

Sep 09

Mets Matters: Wright Still Wants To Play

Mets captain David Wright will play in his second simulated game Tuesday and still holds out hope he’ll return this season. The Mets have pronounced no such optimism.

Reports surfaced late last week the Mets were reluctant for Wright to return this season because it would void their insurance policy that covers 75 percent of his salary.

Coming with those reports was speculation there was tension between the franchise and its face.

“The last thing that I want to portray is that there is some sort of rift between the Mets and I,” Wright said. “That’s false. There has been communication, and I know where they stand and they know where I stand, so the communication, especially recently, has been fantastic, and I look forward to meeting with [chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon] in the coming days and formulating a game plan from here until the end of September.”

Wright will meet with Chief Operating Officer Jeff Wilpon after the simulated game to discuss the action plan for the rest of the season.

While it is understandable why Wright wants to play, but also why the Mets want him to keep sitting for this summer. However, the catch is unless Wright plays, we’ll never know if he’s physically capable of playing.

One would think that it is important to both Wright and the Mets to get that answer, even if it means it costing the team several million dollars.

DeGrom Scratched: With heavy rain in the forecast, the Mets scratched Jacob deGrom from today’s start rather than risk starting him, having him sit through a delay and losing him for the day.

Fundamentally, it was a good call, but it is one less start for him to make his case for the Cy Young Award.

The Mets, carried by starter Corey Oswalt and Michael Conforto’s two-run homer put a crimp in the Phillies’ playoff aspirations with a 6-4 victory.

Syndergaard injured: Noah Syndergaard left Saturday’s game with bruised right ribs after he was struck by a line drive off the bat of Philadelphia’s Cesar Hernandez.

X-Rays were negative.

“It’s a scary situation,” Syndergaard said. “It’s been my nightmare ever since I’ve started playing baseball. Today was just my judgment day of having a screamer come back at me. I mean, everyone was asking if I’m OK. I’m just concerned if the ball is all right.”