Sep 23

If Mets Want Terry Collins Back They Should Make Move Immediately

The New York Mets already know their plans for manager Terry Collins moving forward. Any meetings this week in Cincinnati between Collins and GM Sandy Alderson is for show. The Mets know if they want to retain Collins – indications are they do – and should have already expressed their intent regarding years and money to him.

It would be ridiculous if they have not.

Alderson (L) should not delay in making Collins (R) announcement.

Alderson (L) should not delay in making Collins (R) announcement.

Based on Collins’ job with little talent the past three years, and glut of injuries the past two summers, he merits an opportunity to stay on to benefit from the fruits of their upcoming winter spending.

From his perspective, Collins should know what he wants to do, and probably knows he’s not a hot ticket and likely wouldn’t hear the phone ring too often if he didn’t return to the Mets. He should also know is response should be a “no thank you,” if the offer is for one year.

If the Mets don’t want Collins, they must consider the pool of available managers and realize they won’t pay a loaded contract to Tony La Russa or Jim Leyland, if the latter would leave the Tigers. It’s been suggested the Mets want a “yes man,” and if that’s Collins, so be it.

Quite simply, the Mets can’t afford a maverick, and Alderson probably doesn’t want to work with one.

Ron Gardenhire’s contract expires after this season, but based on media reports, there’s no reason to believe the Minnesota won’t get an extension from general manager Terry Ryan. The Twins have had an awful few years after an impressive run. The Twins are about doing things on a tight budget, which would make him perfect for the Mets.

However, the Twins are also about consistency, which explains their run of success with Gardenhire.

If not Gardenhire, my choices would be either Charlie Manuel, who got a raw deal in Philadelphia, or going through another era of Davey Johnson, who clearly does not want to retire from the Washington Nationals. Johnson, of course, won’t come cheaply.

Please, let’s not hear anything about being too old. Both are sharp and still have considerable to teach and fire left in the tank.

However, since neither would happen we’re back to Collins.

For all the talk about the Mets being a big-market club, they really aren’t in their mentality and actions.

This is especially evident in their off-season spending habits and that in the 13 seasons since their 2000 World Series appearance, they have had four general managers and five managers. That’s a little over three years average per general manager and roughly 2.5 years per manager.

There’s no stability in that, and considering Collins knew most of these players from his time in the Mets’ minor league system, he comes off as the best choice.

They are building a foundation and culture with Collins, who stuck with the Mets in the bad times, and now deserves to stay with the future looking promising.

There’s no reason to delay announcing Collins’ extension.

Normally, I’d say the last day of the season, but that’s reserved for Mike Piazza. The Mets should make the announcement prior to the first game of the Milwaukee series, and if not, the day after the season ends.

There’s no reasonable explanation for not making an immediate announcement, because by now both sides should know their thinking.

A delay gives the perception of confusion and indecision, and haven’t the Mets had enough of that label?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 21

David Wright Delivers For Mets In Return; Matsuzaka Continues To Disappoint

The New York Mets got what they hoped for Friday night in David Wright’s return, but remain wanting with Daisuke Matsuzaka.

Backed by Wright’s first-inning homer, the Mets gave Matsuzaka a 5-0 lead, but he gave up four runs in the fourth inning. Never mind two of the runs were unearned, but a pitcher’s job is to pitch out of trouble.

Matsuzaka not only didn’t escape trouble, but with three walks and four hits in six innings, he contributed to his own demise.

WRIGHT: Welcome back. (MLB)

WRIGHT: Welcome back. (MLB)

Those are not acceptable numbers, and his performance doesn’t even define a No. 5 starter. Aaron Harang has pitched well enough to warrant a spring training invite, but Matsuzaka has not.

Yes, he pitched six innings, and yes, the Mets came away with a victory, but it was a stressful outing and they can’t afford having their bullpen drained once every fifth day.

As for Wright, who played for the first time in seven weeks, he came out of the night sore, but confident: “I want to be able to just flow and react, and I’m not quite there yet as far as the rhythm of the game and that kind of explosiveness that I feel I had before I got hurt.’’

Prior to the game, Wright said he wanted to play in eight of the Mets’ last ten games.

GEE GOES TODAY: Nobody thought it would happen in April, but Dillon Gee will lead the Mets with victories this season. He goes after his 12th victory today and will get another start Thursday against Milwaukee at Citi Field.

Gee’s season turned around with a 12-strikeout game, May 30, at Yankee Stadium.

It was as if switch was flipped.

“I started pitching with more command,’’ Gee said.

HAWKINS GOES FOR MILESTONE: LaTroy Hawkins has 99 career saves, 11 of them coming this season when he assumed the closer role when Bobby Parnell was injured.

At 40, Hawkins still throws in the mid-90s, but more to the point, he still knows how to pitch. Hawkins has been a positive influence in the bullpen and the Mets should bring him back.

They could do far worse.

FLORES TO PLAY SECOND: Wilmer Flores might get more starts at second base in the remaining nine games.

For several years, the Mets struggled to find a position for Daniel Murphy. Ironically, they appear to be trying to replace him with Flores, a player, like Murphy, who had trouble finding a position.

WINTER BALL METS: The Mets are seeking to find winter ball teams for Lucas Duda and Matt den Dekker, both of whom lost at-bats this summer because of injuries.

Duda would get time at first base, a further indication the Mets appear to be moving away from Ike Davis.

As for den Dekker, he could earn a spot next spring if he can hit.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 19

Happy Birthday To Bob Murphy

New York Mets Report and MMO wants to send a Happy Birthday shout-out to the late great Bob Murphy (1924-2004).

“Murph” would have been 89 years old today and I can’t begin to tell you how often I think about him each season. Today’s game has become so noisy and just a non-stop barrage of promos and product pitches the game itself gets lost in translation.

Bob MurphyMurphy hearkens to a time when broadcasters like him, Lindsey Nelson and Ralph Kiner had a profound respect for the National Pastime and understood how the sounds of the game were an integral part of a baseball broadcast.

In 1994, Bob Murphy was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame alongside his former Mets broadcast partner Lindsey Nelson, both were recipient of the prestigious Ford C. Frick Award. Murphy was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1984.

His wonderful, folksy way about him, always made listeners feel right at home and there was nothing better than hearing his happy recaps after a Mets win.

Murph kept all of us company all Summer long like a good friend. We took him wherever we went whether at the beach, a backyard barbecue, or tucked underneath our pillows during those late west coast games. He was a part of our family.

He loved the Mets and in return Mets fans loved him.

Murph we miss you, Happy Birthday…

Sep 17

Mets Wrap: Zack Wheeler Shows He Has More To Learn

Zack Wheeler didn’t take the loss for the New York Mets Tuesday night although he certainly deserved so. This was one of the few times a Mets’ starter came away with a no-decision and it turned out to be a positive for him.

Wheeler was his own worst enemy in five rocky innings as he walked six, including to the leadoff hitter in the fifth that eventually came around to score in large part because he failed to cover first base.

WHEELER: Roughed up by Giants.

WHEELER: Roughed up by Giants.

It is not how Wheeler desired to finish his first season, and certainly not what the smattering of fans at Citi Field wanted to see in an 8-5 loss to the San Francisco Giants.

Because Wheeler is on an innings limit, he might get one more start, next Monday in Cincinnati. It is up in the air whether Wheeler will pitch in the final weekend series against Milwaukee at Citi Field.

Command was a problem for Wheeler in the minor leagues and at times this season on the major league level. This time, he had trouble locating his fastball, and with that it was all an uphill battle.

If there is something to take from Wheeler’s development it has been his ability to minimize damage and put away hitters when in trouble. That’s hard to do when you walk five in one inning, as Wheeler did in the second.

He gave up three runs that inning, but it could have been worse. Even so, Wheeler was in position to get a victory when he took the mound in the fifth. He left the inning with 107 pitches, and pitch counts have been an issue.

Control did him in, but he’ll always remember to hustle to first base.

If the Mets want to stick to Wheeler’s innings limit, that’s fine, but how about skipping him in Cincinnati and let him get a final start at Citi Field? Maybe he’ll redeem himself, and it will be one more chance for the fans to see him.

Wheeler represents the Mets’ future along with Matt Harvey, and perhaps he’ll make the same progressive jump the latter did this season.

With the competitive part of the season long since over for the Mets, their main concern is keeping Wheeler and some players who are injured from doing further damage. In that regard, the Mets are in no hurry to push David Wright.

Prior to the game, Terry Collins said Wright would not be activated for the Giants series because of overall soreness sustained in his rehab from a Grade 2 right hamstring strain.

Wright wants to play, but the prudent thing is to go with caution. Do the Mets really want their last image of Wright this season hobbling off the field after re-injuring his hamstring?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 14

Murphy Is The One You Keep, Not Trade

daniel murphy scores

Terry Collins praised second baseman Daniel Murphy for staying in the lineup down the stretch while battling nagging issues, according to ESPN. Last night’s win over the Marlins was Murphy’s 145th game of the season, and he could play in 161 of the team’s 162 games this year.

“Make no mistake, Dan’s beat up,” Collins said. “He plays so hard, he’s always beat up. He slides hard, he dives for balls. That takes its toll on the season. He comes to the ballpark, he wants in the lineup. He never asks for a day off. That sends a huge message to all those young players. He’s been our man of steel for sure.”

Collins also called Murphy the “backbone of the team” ever since David Wright has been on the disabled list. Murphy is hitting .313 in his last 28 games entering Friday’s contest, and is batting .281 with 10 homers and a career-best 68 RBIs on the season. He also has a career-high 18 stolen bases.

daniel murphy

“He’s the one guy that teams know is a professional hitter,” said Collins. “To everybody in every club he’s the dangerous guy in our lineup. And we needed that. We need to be able to lean on that type of guy.”

Murphy was eligible for salary arbitration for the first time last winter. He requested $3.4 million and was offered $2.55 million by the Mets. They settled on $2.925 for the 2013 season. He now enters his second round of arbitration with a good chance to earn $4 million.

Last month, MetsBlog reported that Murphy may not be worth his price tag:

Murphy is eligible for arbitration each of the next two seasons, and I expect he’ll earn around $4 million in 2014. It’s plausible to think Alderson views Murphy as not worth his price tag, at that point.

Over his five year career, the 28-year-old has batted .289/.332/.441 and has averaged 39 doubles, ten home runs, 73 runs and 69 RBIs per season, putting him in the top ten of second basemen during that span with a 107 OPS+.

I strongly disagree with MetsBlog and view Murphy as one of the most valued players on the Mets and by that I mean the relationship between his performance and what he gets paid. Even at $4 million he gives the Mets more than double that in value.

His value for this season is over $11 million dollars based on his 2.5 fWAR which is second only to David Wright. When you consider that he’s playing at a somewhat premium position, the value is even more as compared to a corner outfielder or first baseman.

Collins is right when he says that Murphy is the only legitimate professional hitter in his lineup right now. Can you imagine this lineup without him?

As far as I’m concerned, Wright and Murphy are the players that Sandy Alderson needs to build around this offseason. Everyone else in that lineup is just a mystery at this point and not a given.

Mets Country