Feb 27

Wheeler Scratched From Start With Oblique Strain

It will not be the dream spring training for Zach Wheeler that he might have hoped. After all the Stephen Strasburg comparisons, Wheeler was scratched from today’s start against St. Louis with a mild strain of the oblique muscle.

Wheeler sustained the injury swinging a bat in pregame warm-ups. He said the injury was nothing serious and it felt a little stiff, but that is something we’ve heard numerous times from various Mets – notably Jose Reyes – over the years about this type of injury.

“I’d rather be out one start than two months and be behind the eight-ball when I do come back,’’ Wheeler told reporters. “Early in the spring you don’t want to risk anything. We have a month, or a month and a half, left.’’

Veteran Mets watchers will quickly say it will be more than one start, but he’s right, caution is the way to go on this injury. Muscle strains and muscle pulls always last longer than originally speculated; it’s a baseball variation of Murphy’s Law.

Continue reading

Feb 27

Mets And Amway; An Odd Couple

This is why they are the Mets. Their ownership group gets stung by a Ponzi scheme, loses millions of dollars and was on the verge, with an unfavorable court ruling, of possibly losing the franchise.

So, what does it do? It aligns itself with Amway, a direct seller who has been sued for being a pyramid scheme.

imgresAmway employs millions to sell home cleaning products and vitamins, but mostly to convince others to do the same. That’s where an Amway distributor makes its money.

This is as odd a choice as the Mets could have made for a business partner. Seriously, doesn’t anybody in the organization have a filter that could have caught this?

“Excuse me, Mr. Wilpon, but we should think twice about this,’’ somebody should have said.

So, on the side of Citi Field there is a sign promoting Amway, a corporation which settled a class action lawsuit for millions after being accused of operating a pyramid scheme.

Nobody saw the connection?

Continue reading

Feb 26

Response To Proposed Giancarlo Stanton Deal To Mets

I read with great interest what my colleague, Joe DeCaro, posted on his website about a possible trade for Miami’s Giancarlo Stanton in exchange for Zack Wheeler and Travis d’Arnaud.

STANTON: Interesting to think about.

STANTON: Interesting to think about.

There are compelling reasons for both teams to pull the trigger on this deal, but also for standing pat.

Personally, I don’t see it happening.

The Marlins don’t have to worry about Stanton’s contract until 2017, when he becomes a free agent. They are paying him a paltry $480,000 this year. The earliest the Marlins have to worry about paying him the big bucks is when he becomes arbitration eligible in 2014. He’s then a free agent at 2017.

If owner Jeffrey Loria were smart, and we know that’s not the case, he’d tie up Stanton now for the long term, but that’s not happening.

“We are hoping that that moment will come but Giancarlo needs to play this year,’’ Loria told The Palm Beach Post. “He is here for certainly the foreseeable future and we will cross that bridge at the appropriate moment.

Continue reading

Feb 25

Until The Product On The Field Improves, Mets Attendance Will Continue To Decline

mets fans

Josh Kosman of the NY Post is reporting that the Mets won’t have much money to play with this season and are expecting to lose more than $10 million this year as well as suffering a fifth straight year of declining attendance.

“There is little room this year to raise salaries,” said a source familiar with the team’s finances told the Post.

Last week, principal owner Fred Wilpon told reporters that the Mets’ money woes were over and suggested that he had the resources to boost payroll and sign some major free agents if that’s what Sandy Alderson chose to do.

“While attendance is expected to be down,” Kosman writes. “The team is banking on a small uptick in gate proceeds in its second season of so-called dynamic pricing, which allows ticket prices to be adjusted on the fly based on supply and demand.”

As I’ve said repeatedly and will say again, unless the product on the field improves, fans will continue to stay away. People don’t flock to ballparks and lay out a hundred bucks a game just because a team’s farm system ranks in the top ten. What matters most is wins and the players they pay to see.

As I’ve preached for the last two years, it looks like payroll will in fact be around $80 million in 2013 counting dollars that are actually being paid out. In July of 2011, many of my readers were aghast at that projection and yet here we are.

Next season, the Mets will have about $30 million in payroll commitments, give or take a few. Does anyone really expect Sandy Alderson to go out on a $70 million dollar spending spree? I don’t.

Read Kosman’s full article in the New York Post here.

Feb 25

Harvey And D’Arnaud Not There; Duda Totally Off

The Mets tell us to look forward to 2014 and beyond, but we received a glimpse into that future Sunday when Matt Harvey pitched two innings to catcher Travis d’Arnaud.

After ten starts last summer, Harvey is already in the Mets’ rotation; for d’Arnaud, it was his first game since he injured his left knee last June.

There were several communication issues, which is to be expected from a young battery that has never worked together. The most important lesson is Harvey has the final decision on what he throws. If he doesn’t like the pitch, he calls d’Arnaud out to the mound. The bottom line is the pitcher has control over what he throws. If he’s not comfortable with the pitch it will get crushed.

Like a lot of people, d’Arnaud praised Harvey’s poise and demeanor. Harvey said he wasn’t concerned with the miscommunication, citing that they hadn’t worked together before.

Manager Terry Collins made it a point to say d’Arnaud would catch each of the Mets’ starters.

The Mets were also happy with Dillon Gee, who made his first start since surgery last season to repair a damaged artery in his shoulder. Gee threw last September, so he had a feel for his arm and expressed no worries.

Meanwhile, not having a feel for anything is Lucas Duda, who so far is 0-for-7 with six strikeouts. Not anywhere to go but up from there.

Duda’s problem is mechanical reports ESPN in that his lead foot is still too high when he begins his stride. Consequently, he’s not in hitting position and the ball gets in on him too quickly.

WEEKEND METS NOTES: Jonathan Niese gave up a run on three hits in two innings against the University of Michigan. He came out of the game saying he needed to work on getting ahead in the count more. Actually, that’s what all pitchers need to do. … Josh Edgin blew a save against Houston. … Jeurys Familia. … Collin Cowgill is making a good impression.