Oct 21

Mets’ Fans And Murphy Should Cherish The Moment

Daniel Murphy has no explanation why he has homered in six straight games during this incredible playoff run by the Mets. He did it again Wednesday night and was named NLCS MVP.

“If I knew, I would have done it six years ago,’’ said Murphy, whose first inclination when asked is to credit his teammates. “I can’t explain it. I’m just going to ride this.”

He’ll ride it into the Mets’ fifth World Series appearance in their history, which begins Tuesday in either Kansas City or Toronto. Nobody really cares where, just that their season will continue.

MURPHY:  Enjoying the moment. (Getty)

MURPHY: Enjoying the moment. (Getty)

I wrote the other day how much I admired Murphy’s attitude, but said it was time he he took a bow after all the static he’s taken for his defense. He deserves this moment in the sun.

With Murphy’s unconscious streak comes the inevitable talk of whether the Mets will sign him long-term or to a qualifying offer. I’ve written it also, but on second thought, what does it matter?

Eventually, I’ll write it again. And, about bringing back Yoenis Cespedes and how he hurt his left shoulder and had to leave the game last night. Or, what’s going on with David Wright’s back. And, what workload the Mets’ starters might have next season. Or, what GM Sandy Alderson will do about rebuilding his bullpen.

There are a lot of things to review about this season, including whether Terry Collins will be named manager of the year. (He should). You guys know me, you know I’ll address them. But, at least for today I don’t want to hear them. I don’t care about next season.

This is a moment to be savored, to be cherished. It is a moment that prompted somebody online to write how he wished he was five-years-old again so he can grow up to be a Mets fan. How precious is that?

“This city deserves it,” said an exuberant Wright, who trusted Alderson and Jeff Wilpon, who promised him good times were within reach.

“This organization deserves it. The players deserve this. … I can’t describe the emotions that are going through me right now.”

The offseason news can wait a few more weeks. The topics will still be there; they aren’t going anywhere.

The last time the Mets were in the World Series was 2000. Before that, it was 1986. Before that, it was 1973 and 1969. Do you sense a trend here?

Wright said this team was a combination of the 1969 Miracle Mets and 1973 Tug McGraw, “Ya Gotta Believe,” team.

When Wright went to the playoffs in 2006, he thought it would be that way every year. However, he learned how fleeting a moment this can be. As Mets followers, we understand that.

We follow the Mets because we love that team. The reasons why, don’t matter. We just do. It is in our DNA.

However, despite the Mets’ young pitching, nothing is a given. Nothing. We don’t know about the future. None of us do.

So, let’s not worry about something beyond our control. Let’s enjoy this, as this is a rare and precious time.

It could be our best time.

 

 

Oct 19

Mets’ Series Lead Could Enable Harvey To Rest

In addition to the historical percentages of advancing to the World Series, winning the first two games of the NLCS against Chicago, gives the Mets the advantage of bypassing the injured Matt Harvey in Game 5 if necessary.

Harvey took a line drive off the bat of Dexter Fowler to the back of his pitching arm in the sixth inning of Game 1, and already, manager Terry Collins is alluding to possibly of starting Jon Niese or Bartolo Colon.

HARVEY:  Questionable for Thursday. (Getty)

HARVEY: Questionable for Thursday. (Getty)

“He’s pretty sore and pretty swelled up,’’ Collins said Monday at Wrigley Field. “He, as we sit here today, is a go. But that could certainly change in the next couple of days.

“I was pretty surprised at how swelled up it was yesterday. So we certainly are going to keep a really close eye on it the next couple of days.’’

Of course, the Mets want to wrap this up as soon as possible, but if they win one of the next two games, they’ll be sitting pretty with a 3-1 series edge heading into Game 5.

Harvey, who won his first two postseason starts, played catch today. Harvey’s innings became a focal point at the end of the season, but if he’s held back Thursday, it will have nothing to do with his workload.

Harvey stayed in the game after he was struck, and pitching coach Dan Warthen said that was beneficial because it enabled him to keep his arm stretched out.

Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

 

Oct 18

Bringing Back Murphy A No-Brainer

You have to admire modesty, but Daniel Murphy needs to take a bow. Seriously, he might be having the best offensive postseason in Mets’ history, and all he did was talk about Noah Syndergaard and the bullpen.

I like that, especially in this age of self-congratulatory athletes, but if anybody deserves to pat himself on the back, it is Murphy, who has five homers and eight RBI in seven playoff games. That production comes against the likes of Clayton Kershaw, Zack Greinke, Jon Lester, and now Jake Arrieta. Tonight’s two-run drive off Arrieta in the first inning jumpstarted a 4-1 victory to put the Mets two games from the World Series.

MURPHY: Bring him back. (Getty)

MURPHY: Bring him back. (Getty)

Now, who expected that coming into the season, which many of us thinking it would be free-agent to be Murphy’s last with the Mets? Murphy, who made $8 million this season, was not expected to be in the Mets’ winter shopping plans, especially with considering Yoenis Cespedes.

However, Murphy worked with hitting coach Kevin Long about being more selective and trying to turn on the pitch. It paid off.

“I don’t think this is a phase for him,’’ said GM Sandy Alderson. “I think that in some ways he’s a fundamentally different hitter than he was, as recently as three, four months ago. And the intensity that he has in the playoff situation certainly is evident, as well. He’s really focused, and he’s always been sound mechanically. But I think his approach is a little bit different, which has made him a more dangerous hitter.’’

But, dangerous enough to bring back?

The Mets won’t pony up the money needed for Cespedes, who reportedly is seeking at least $120 million over seven years. With Michael Conforto, Juan Lagares signed long-term, two years left with Curtis Granderson, and Brandon Nimmo in the wings, the Mets could let Cespedes walk.

However, the infield could be suspect with David Wright and Ruben Tejada coming off injuries. That would make Murphy somebody they couldn’t afford to lose.

I don’t expect the Mets to give Murphy four years, but a $16-million qualifying offer could keep him around for another year until they sort this out.

Whatever happens in these playoffs, that sounds like a no-brainer.

Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

Oct 18

Mets Might Not Have Familia In Game 2

Eventually, Mets manager Terry Collins must go to regular-season relievers Tyler Clippard and Addison Reed after using closer Jeurys Familia the last two games for more than one inning.

That could come tonight as Collins said he might not have Familia available in Game 2.

“I don’t know, maybe Jeurys [Sunday] will need a night off and we can close with Clip and set up with Addison,’’ Collins said. “We’ve got options down there. …I’m hoping Noah goes deep in the game. That’s the perfect scenario. Sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn’t, but when it does, I think you’ve got to go to it.’’

The Mets used Noah Syndergaard in middle relief in Game 5 and Bartolo prior to that in the NLCS. Clearly, Collins felt more confortable to using starters in middle relief.

“I’m not trying to [deliberately not use my middle relievers],’’ Collins said. “It’s just we’ve got pretty good starting pitching, and if they can get deep into the game [and] you’ve got what I think is one of the best closers in baseball [then] I like our chances.’’

Something to watch for tonight.

Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

Oct 18

Refined Syndergaard Aims To Give Mets Commanding NLCS Lead

Several month ago, when it didn’t feel like snow and the Mets had not morphed into the team three games from the World Series, Noah Syndergaard debuted against the Cubs in Wrigley Field. They lost, but the game was circled as one that would come back to bite them in the rear.

imagesIt did not and Syndergaard developed into what we expected: A stud pitcher with star potential.

Since then, the Mets got back Travis d’Arnaud and David Wright, brought up Michael Conforto, and added Yoenis Cespedes to their stagnant lineup. In those few months, Syndergaard also added refined mechanics to his 100 mph. fastball.

“My mechanics are completely different,” said Syndergaard, who is now able to throw his secondary pitches for strikes behind in the count. “`I think my mentality out there is a lot different. I’ve been able to go out there with a lot more confidence in myself and getting myself out of certain situations by using necessarily uncomfortable pitches that I might have used at a different time.”

When Syndergaard came up in early May to replace the injured Dillon Gee, it was thought he might eventually end up in the bullpen. He eventually did in Game 5 of the NLDS, and it seemingly put manager Terry Collins in the corner as to his Game 2 NLCS starter when he warmed up four times.

“The first couple times he only threw 16, 18 pitches before the inning was over,” Collins said. “But he said, `I feel great. I’m not stiff. I’m not sore.’ And I said, `Well, then you’ve got [Sunday].’ ”

With the Mets to start Jacob deGrom in Game 3 at Wrigley Field, this is as close to a must-win game for the Cubs as can be.

Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook.