Jan 13

Mets Cruise Through Arbitration; No Drama For Harvey, Familia

Too bad the Mets don’t cruise through the regular season the way they do their arbitration schedule. The Mets traditionally blitz through the arbitration process and this winter seems no different as they came to terms with nine of their ten arbitration-eligible players, with only Wilmer Flores heading to a hearing.

HARVEY: Signs right away. (AP)

HARVEY: Signs right away. (AP)

However, there’s plenty time for a resolution before a hearing this spring. Count on that getting done, because after all, what the gap between Flores and the Mets has to be slim considering he made only $526,000 last summer. What I gather from this is Flores is tired of being pushed around by Alderson, who frequently made him the versatile infielder a butt of his jokes after the proposed deal to Milwaukee fell through two years ago.

If only for the hope of getting a few extra bucks out of Alderson, it’s probably worth it for Flores to make the GM’s life difficult for only a few minutes.

I was happy to see Matt Harvey ($5.125 million), Jacob deGrom ($4.05 million) and Jeurys Familia ($7.425 million) come to terms quickly considering their baggage.

Harvey is 29-28 lifetime and has yet to give the Mets a full season; deGrom, like Harvey, is coming off surgery; and Familia is facing at least a 30-game suspension to start the season. For Harvey and Familia, especially, they rightly figured nobody wanted to hear their drama.

The Mets came to terms with Lucas Duda ($7.25 million) and Zack Wheeler ($800,000) earlier in the week and with Travis d’Arnaud ($1.875 million), Addison Reed ($7.75 million) and reliever Josh Edgin.

Jan 10

Arbitration-Eligible Mets

The Mets traditionally settle with their arbitration-eligible players and that trend is expected to be the same this winter. The deadline for the parties to file figures is Friday.

The following Mets are arbitration-eligible (with their 2016 salaries in parenthesis): Lucas Duda ($6.725 million); Addison Reed ($5.3 million); Matt Harvey ($4,325 million); Jeurys Familia ($4.1 million); Zack Wheeler ($546,000); Josh Edgin ($625,000); Travis d’Arnaud ($542,000); Wilmer Flores ($526,000) and Jacob deGrom ($607,000).

Of course, everybody gets raises, because that’s how arbitration works, even for players coming off injuries – Duda, Harvey, Wheeler and deGrom – or facing a suspension like Familia.

 

Jan 09

What’s Keeping Mets From Signing Blevins?

Jerry Blevins earned $4 million last season from the Mets, one in which he posted a 2.79 ERA and struck out 52 hitters in 42 innings over 73 games.

Considering the Mets are seeking relief help in the wake of Jeurys Familia’s anticipated suspension, what seems to be the hold up other than he’s 33 years old and they are prone to play hardball with their free agents?

Actually, that’s about it.

In today’s market, $4 million isn’t a lot of money, and the Toronto Blue Jays – who are interested in Blevins – won’t break the bank for him.

If the Mets want to keep Blevins, which they claim – and there are no reports to they are close to signing anybody else – they should have wrapped this up weeks ago. Could it be the Mets aren’t moving because they don’t want him back, contrary to what they’ve said?

The Mets did sign minor league relievers Ben Rowen, 28, and Cory Burns, 29, to minor league contracts. Burns was invited to spring training, but not Rowen.

What this means is the Mets still have a lot of work to do fixing their bullpen.

 

Jan 08

Brief Comparisons Between Mets And Nationals

The Washington Nationals won 95 games last year and had a plus-151 run differential. While it is hard to project how many victories they’ll have this summer, they realistically should be good for at least 90 victories based on the following:

Bryce Harper had a miserable dropoff is batting average, on-base percentage and slugging percentage. Assuming he stays healthy his numbers should improve, at least enough to off-set any drop from Daniel Murphy.

The acquisition of outfielder Adam Eaton from the White Sox is expected to improve the offense, which also should be aided by a full season from Trea Turner. Together that should make up for the declines of Ryan Zimmerman and Jayson Werth.

However – and there’s always a however – the Nationals have issues.

Just as the Mets are optimistic in the comebacks of Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz, so are the Nationals expecting returns from Stephen Strasburg and Joe Ross.

Washington couldn’t keep closer Mark Melancon, which puts them on a par with the Mets, who are expecting to be without closer Jeurys Familia for at least the first month. Both teams need to patch their bullpens.

In comparing the Nationals and Mets, Washington added to a 95-win team while New York basically kept the status quo and is banking heavily on their injured pitchers bouncing back.

 

 

 

 

Jan 07

Forget About Reyes In Center

There’s been some talk about playing Jose Reyes in center field at times this summer to take advantage of his speed. It’s a thought best left for a 17-degree night in January with a foot of snow on the ground. Seriously, what’s the purpose?

With the guy they re-signed last winter to play center not wanting to – that being, of course, Yoenis Cespedes – the Mets have a muddled outfield and tinkering with Reyes in center just complicates things further.

As it is, Curtis Granderson, Michael Conforto and Gold Glover Juan Lagares will share time in center. Then, there’s Brandon Nimmo if he’s on the 25-man roster. Why fool around with an unproven Reyes in center?

Makes no sense.

Reyes needs to stay on the left side of the infield, backing up David Wright and Asdrubal Cabrera, where he’ll do the most good. Center field is something to talk about when it’s too cold outside to do anything but think about baseball in an effort to keep yourself warm.