Aug 29

Three Mets’ Storylines: Cespedes Makes Statement

It is hard to say what was the more deafening sound, the Citi Field crowd after Yoenis Cespedes’ game-winning homer or the cash register in Jeff Wilpon’s mind ringing up what the Mets might have to pay to bring him back next summer and beyond.

Cespedes has two years remaining on his contract, but can opt out after this season. The contract calls for him to make $27.5 million this year and $25 million in each of the next two seasons.

CESPEDES: Flexes Mets to win. (AP)

CESPEDES: Flexes Mets to win. (AP)

Cespedes said he’d like to stay with the Mets, but stopped short of saying he will come back. If stands to reason that the better Cespedes performs – he had three hits, including his 27th homer in the 10th inning to beat Miami, 2-1 – the greater his leverage.

To bring Cespedes back, they’ll have to increase both dollars and years. It’s easy to say, “well, just give him the money,’’ after what he did Monday, but the Mets will then have to make a decision on Jay Bruce and Curtis Granderson, and what to do with Michael Conforto.

Bruce has done little since coming over from the Reds. They could buy out Granderson. And, in April, Conforto was penciled in to be the Mets’ No. 3 hitter for the next decade.

However, none of them have what Cespedes does, which is the ability to jumpstart and carry a team with one swing. The Mets have had only a handful of players that no matter, they force you to watch and not look away when they come to the plate. Dave Kingman was one, then Darryl Strawberry and Mike Piazza. Finally, there is Cespedes, who carried the Mets last season into October, and has been doing it again since coming off the disabled list.

“He’s that kind of player,” manager Terry Collins said. “You expect to see big things from him each and every time he comes up. People pay to see him. They want to see what he can do.”

Cespedes can be infuriating, such as not running out a pop-up that fell for a hit in the first. Against Jose Fernandez, you knew runs would be at a premium and not hustling into scoring position could have bitten them in the end.

Even with his tight right quad, he should have been on second. However, that gets filed away when he takes control of a game as he did facing off against Nick Wittgren with two outs in the tenth.

“In big moments I really try to focus and deliver,” Cespedes said through an interpreter. “I know they were pitching me away, but I was looking for something in.”

Cespedes’ game-winning drive was clearly the top storyline of the night. Jose Reyes stealing a run in the eighth and the pitching from Rafael Montero and the bullpen were the other two.

A REYES RUN: When the Mets signed Reyes at the end of June, they sold the fan base on the premise he would bring energy and speed to their station-to-station offense. What they had in mind was the eighth inning.

Down by a run, Reyes lead off the eighth with a line double into the right field corner. When it appeared Alejandro De Aza failed to advance him on a fly to left, Reyes tagged and moved to third, then scored on a head-first slide following A.J. Ramos’ wild pitch.

Reyes appeared to be hurt on the play when Ramos fell on the Met infielder’s head and left shoulder. Reyes remained in the game, but we’ll see how he feels tomorrow.

MONTERO FILLS BILL: Montero made the spot start because the Mets believed normally scheduled starter Jacob deGrom – who gave up a combined 13 runs in his last two starts – was fatigued. Montero, brought up from Double-A Binghamton, gave up only two hits in five scoreless innings, but threw 100 pitches in large part because he walked six.

If Collins wanted to see if Montero could respond to a challenge, his concerns were answered in the positive. Montero was in constant trouble and left the Marlins stranded with RISP in the first, fourth and fifth.

Montero left the bases loaded in the fourth and needed a double play to get out of the fifth. With how he pitched, Montero will stay after the rosters are expanded, Sept. 1.

While Montero was the unexpected, the bullpen was something they counted on.

Addison Reed gave up a run in the eighth on doubles by Ichiro Suzuki and Xavier Scruggs. The Mets also received scoreless innings from Sean Gilmartin (6th inning), Jerry Blevins (7th), Jeurys Familia (9th) and Josh Smoker (10th).

Combined, the bullpen gave up one run on three hits, one walk and six strikeouts.

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Aug 10

Have Mets Cooled On D’Arnaud?

The numbers aren’t good for Travis d’Arnaud, that much can’t be disputed. Even so, Mets manager Terry Collins made a red-flag kind of move with his decision to pinch-hit for him Tuesday night.

Down by two with two outs and a runner on first in the ninth, d’Arnaud represented the tying run when his spot came up in the order. Only d’Arnaud, the Mets’ No. 1 catcher, was pinch-hit for by Ty Kelly, who would be making just his 32nd career at-bat.

D'ARNAUD: What's Mets' future? (Getty)

D’ARNAUD: What’s Mets’ future? (Getty)

Although d’Arnaud has been cold, I was surprised because he has the power to tie the game. Clearly Collins didn’t have confidence in him last night, but I wonder if he has lost all confidence.

Can you really blame him? Can you blame GM Sandy Alderson if he goes in another direction next year, and I don’t mean towards Rene Rivera and Kevin Plawecki?

The Mets have waited for d’Arnaud to not only become the player they traded for, but just stay on the field. He spent nearly two months on the disabled list this season with a strained rotator cuff, two months in 2015 and two weeks in 2014.

D’Arnaud, a lifetime .243 hitter, averages only seven homers and 25 RBI a season. Nothing at all to get excited about. More importantly, he averages just 62 games played a year. That’s something that should worry the Mets.

Defensively, the ERA of Mets’ pitchers is over a run a game higher with d’Arnaud than Rivera. Potential base stealers run at will against d’Arnaud, who doesn’t get any help with Mets pitchers’ inability to hold runners. The Diamondbacks stole five bases last night.

The Mets are in a pennant race, but at the same time keeping an eye on the future. And, right now that eye is turning away from d’Arnaud.

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Feb 03

Another look at Mets’ woeful pitching.

ESPN had an interesting post when it examined the starting rotations of the NL East teams. They still have Johan Santana listed as No. 1, which is puzzling.

What I found most interesting is that every team’s No. 3 starter would qualify as the Mets’ No. 1.

Edwin Jackson is reportedly on his way to Washington, where he’s the projected third starter behind Stephen Strasburg and Gio Gonzalez. The Braves’ No. 3 is Tommy Hanson. Miami’s third starter is Ricky Nolasco and Philadelphia’s is Cole Hamels.

The Mets’ projected rotation is Santana, R.A. Dickey, Jon Niese, Mike Pelfrey and Dillon Gee.

It’s all about pitching and this is a grim reminder of the Mets’ status.

Mar 17

March 17.10: Pelfrey needs luck of the Irish.

Mike Pelfrey gets his third start of the spring this afternoon against Boston at Ft. Myers. Three starts in, and we should be seeing signs of progress from Pelfrey. So far, we haven’t. In his previous two starts, Pelfrey was hit with a big inning, which isn’t a good sign.

Pelfrey entered camp as the Mets’ No. 2 starter, and we need to see signs of that today. A big inning, and three runs counts in that regard, is an indication of not being able to put hitters away and limit the damage. That was indicative last year when he got into trouble and it is surfacing again.

There is no doubt, out of necessity, Pelfrey has been rushed by the Mets. But, what is done is done, and he’s had enough time where we should be seeing signs of development. It would be nice to see some of that today.

Apr 08

Are you concerned about Pelfrey?

Mike Pelfrey isn’t concerned about Mike Pelfrey, which is the most important thing. Early in their careers, when some pitchers reach a high in innings pitched, they hit a wall. Sometimes, it’s injury related. Other times performance driven.

Pelfrey doesn’t want to hear about injuries, especially the little, nagging kind. In that regard, I’ll take him at his word and expect him to pitch well tonight at Cincinnati.

Pelfrey is the Mets’ No. 2 starter, but by default. If John Maine and Oliver Perez were pitching to expectations, Pelfrey would be the No. 4 starter. Because Maine and Perez have issues, I don’t like the idea of throwing them back-to-back because of the potential toll on the bullpen.

I’ll have a Mets Chat Room tonight at 7:00 p.m., for Game #2, Mets at Reds. Hope you’ll join me.