May 31

Today in Mets History: A long one vs. the Giants.

Greetings all. I hope you had a great holiday weekend. I was away at a place with no Internet access and it was like being stranded on Gilligan’s Island without the Professor.

KRANEPOOL: A busy day.

I see I didn’t miss much with the Mets during the Phillies series. A lot of pre-series talk about getting back to .500 and making a statement went by the boards. It’s time to climb out of the hole again.

Tonight it is the Pirates, but on this day in 1964, the Mets played an unforgettable doubleheader against the San Francisco Giants at Shea Stadium. The Giants swept, winning the first game, 5-3, but needing 23 amazing innings to prevail in the nightcap, 8-6.

“I wanted it to go a little longer,’’ said Ed Kranepool, who played in all 32 innings. “That way I could say I played in a game that started in May and ended in June.’’

The Mets tied it in the seventh inning on a three-run homer by Joe Christopher off Bob Bolin and even turned a triple play in the 14th inning. The game lasted 7:23.

It’s always fascinating looking at the box scores for games like this. Eight different players, including Willie Mays for the Giants and Kranepool for the Mets had 10 at-bats. Galen Cisco for the Mets pitched nine innings of relief and took the loss, while Gaylord Perry worked ten innings in relief for the Giants and earned the win.

Years later, Perry said that game enabled him to break into the Giants rotation and launch his Hall of Fame Career.

GAME ONE

GAME TWO

 

May 27

Today in Mets History: Zeile has big day.

I’d be lying if I said reporters didn’t have their favorite athletes. One of mine was Todd Zeile, whom I covered when he was with the Yankees. When Zeile retired following the 2004 season, he did so with the distinction of hitting at least one homer for each of the 11 teams he played for during his career. He also homered in his final at-bat, Oct. 3, as a Met. However, on this day in 2000, Zeile homered twice, including a grand slam, as the Mets beat St. Louis, 12-8.

CAREER NUMBERS

 

NOTE: Going away for the weekend for friend’s wedding. Will take laptop with me, but don’t know about Internet. Will try to blog if I can. Have a great Memorial Day weekend.


May 27

Today in Mets History: Big day for Zeile.

I’d be lying if I said reporters didn’t have their favorite athletes. One of mine was Todd Zeile, whom I covered when he was with the Yankees.

When Zeile retired following the 2004 season, he did so with the distinction of hitting at least one homer for each of the 11 teams he played for during his career.

He also homered in his final at-bat, Oct. 3, as a Met.

However, on this day in 2000, Zeile homered twice, including a grand slam, as the Mets beat St. Louis, 12-8.

CAREER NUMBERS

 

 

May 26

Today in Mets History: Funny anecdote in rout of Cubs.

Good morning folks. Anything that makes one laugh out loud is something to share. Such is the case with this note. There are a lot of funny nuggets in Mets lore, but this one is a gem.

On this date in 1964, the Mets scored a then club record 19 runs in a 19-1 rout of the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

As the story goes, a fan called a New York newspaper and asked, “How did the Mets do today?’’

He was told they scored 19 runs.

After a pause, the fan asked, “Did they win?’’

Actually, in reading about those days, its plausible to think it happened.

It would have been interesting to follow them as an expansion team. If anybody has any early-year stories, please share.

May 25

What will happen next for disappointing Mets?

In researching Today in Mets History, I didn’t discover much besides Al Weis’ homer, but odds are there will be nothing more significant than tonight’s response  to last night’s 11-1 embarrassment at Wrigley Field.

For the second straight game, a sloppy big inning did them in, but overall, they committed three errors, had their bullpen torched, watched Jon Niese struggle again, didn’t hit, and for good measure, had Jason Bay injure his right calf.

Bay isn’t expected to play tonight, assuming weather allows the game to get it. Maybe not playing will be a good thing for the Mets as it will give them another day to stew over owner Fred Wilpon’s comments. Wilpon, guarded for so long, called out his three best players and termed the Mets a “crappy” team, only with vulgarity.

Manager Terry Collins insisted Wilpon’s comments and the swirling controversy about payroll and who will or will not get traded had no bearing on last night. Perhaps they didn’t, but there’s no way if this continues that it won’t have an accumulative effect.

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