Feb 15

Feb. 15.10: Who’s primed for a breakout year?

When you look at all the Mets’ issues, it must be remembered the flip side is also true and that the positive could happen. No, today I’m not looking at who I consider the most important Met to be – for me it is Jose Reyes in the field and Mike Pelfrey on the mound – but the guy poised for a breakout season. By that, I mean his best year and finally showing signs of potential.

MAINE: Could this be a breakout year?

MAINE: Could this be a breakout year?


What’s your gut telling you?

Will one of the catchers step up and shed the platoon label?
Will Daniel Murphy show some power?
Will Pelfrey, John Maine or Oliver Perez shake the inconsistency label and win north of 15 games?
Will Jeff Francoeur become the power the Braves once projected of him?

Scanning the Mets’ roster, two names immediately grab my attention as possibilities for breakout seasons: Murphy and Maine.

I like Murphy to have a big year because of last year was a learn-on-the-job experience which he picked up fairly well. I also believe with a full year of learning the pitchers and getting stronger, that his power numbers should increase. He won’t hit 40, but 20 would be a significant improvement.

I’m also liking Maine because all indications are he’s healthy. Sometimes, it is the second year after the surgery when a pitcher feels comfortable again. I believe Pelfrey will improve; have no clue about Perez, but I’m trying to think positive; but I think Maine is poised to have a year better than 2007 when he won 15 games.

Feb 10

Feb. 10.10: Your favorite Met.

It is cold and nasty today where I live in Connecticut. Time to think warm and pleasant thoughts, so here goes: Who is your all-time favorite Met?

He doesn’t have to be good, either. He could be a non-descript outfielder who waved at you in the stands, or your first autograph. Or anything else that made you follow him with your heart.

Jan 15

Jan. 15.10: The bottom line.

Let’s forget about who is right or wrong in the Carlos Beltran fiasco. The bottom line is the Mets are without their best player, who has a degenerative condition, and with no guarantee of how he’ll perform if and when he returns.

All prognosis have to be met with skepticism.

The Mets aren’t equipped to replace Beltran, and as it has been pointed out, this adds the need to consider Carlos Delgado to offset the loss of power.

But, who plays center field?

If the Mets had no confidence with Angel Pagan in left field, they certainly don’t have confidence in him in center.

There’s not a lot out there left on the free agent market, but as I wrote several weeks ago, Rick Ankiel is available. He strikes out a ton, but he does hit for power and is very good defensively. If I’m Ankiel’s agent, I’m calling the Mets.

Jan 14

Jan. 14.10: The Mets should have done better all around.

Yes, I understand about wanting the third opinion. But after thinking about it, so what?

It was reported the Mets knew of Beltran’s condition, otherwise they wouldn’t have sent workman’s compensation paperwork to the physician. And, if what the Mets are saying is true, that they were monitoring this all along, they should have pushed the envelope on surgery in December to give Beltran a chance to be ready.

The first sign of pain should have been met with action.

There were reports this summer Beltran might have needed surgery, but they chose to wait, which was a disaster. This is something that could have been done in September and if so wouldn’t be an issue today.

The Mets also look bad in how they handled their response. They should have said they were on-board with the surgery inside of airing their dirty laundry this way. Saying they knew all along but were kept out of the loop at the end doesn’t ring well at all.

In how they handled this makes them look sloppy and inept. There’s now finger pointing and talk of legal action. Who wins here? Certainly not the Mets, who have simply aggravated their best player. And, certainly not Beltran, who’s in a cast right now.