Mar 30

Maybe Harvey’s Poor Spring Comes From Lack Of Work

Matt Harvey might not be pitching to midseason form, but his attitude has a July feel. Harvey’s poor pitching this spring continued Wednesday when he gave up a three-run homer to Washington’s Ryan Zimmerman, and after the game didn’t talk to reporters.

HARVEY: Had poor spring. (Getty)

HARVEY: Had poor spring. (Getty)

Reportedly, he didn’t like the coverage of his bladder treatment, and this is how he decided to handle it.

I’ll just say: If Harvey really wants to be considered an ace, then he needs to understand aces have a responsibility to talk with the media. And, if he’s as smart as he thinks he is, he had to know he would be asked how he felt considering his medical issue. It comes with the territory of being a star.

Real aces would understand. Anyway, Harvey has pitched like anything but a star.

His 1-2 record and 7.50 ERA is irrelevant. However, in 12 innings he’s given up 10 hits and nine walks for a 1.83 WHIP. Hitters are batting .302 against him. And, let’s not forget the six runs he gave up in a minor league game against the Cardinals.

“You can say whatever you want; it’s still spring training,” manager Terry Collins told reporters. “We’ll worry about how he throws the ball on Sunday night.”

So, what’s Harvey’s problem? All indications are his arm is fine, but he’s only pitched in four exhibition games. Normally, a starter would get six starts and work 30 innings. Perhaps, in an effort to protect Harvey, the Mets didn’t give him enough work.

Just a thought.

 

 

Mar 29

Mets Get Good News On Harvey

The Mets received good news this morning regarding Matt Harvey, who was cleared to pitch Opening Day, Sunday, in Kansas City, Harvey developed a urinary tract infection creating a blood clot in his bladder, which he passed Monday night.

HARVEY: Still on for Sunday. (AP)

HARVEY: Still on for Sunday. (AP)

“It started with a bladder infection and it created a blood clot in the bladder,” Harvey told reporters Tuesday morning. “I passed it yesterday. It wasn’t a great first day [after] my 27th birthday. But we cleared that. And then we had a little procedure done this morning just to go in and check the bladder and everything was clear.”

He was supposed to pitch Tuesday, but instead will pitch several innings Wednesday.

Harvey said the problem was created when he held his urine.

“I didn’t really know what was going on,” Harvey said. “I was having trouble using the restroom. Anytime there’s discoloration in your urine, it’s not a great feeling. So I didn’t know what was going on with my stomach. We had some tests yesterday and everything is fine now. … I guess the main issue is I hold my urine in for too long instead of peeing regularly. I guess I have to retrain my bladder to use the restroom a little bit more instead of holding it in. I guess that’s what caused the bladder infection.”

 

 

 

Mar 28

Harvey’s Ailment Cause For Concern

The Mets shutting down Matt Harvey for the remainder of spring training with an undisclosed medical ailment reminds us of the fragility of an athlete. The Mets aren’t being specific as to the nature of the problem, but are saying it isn’t his elbow or shoulder. Agent Scott Boras hasn’t commented. Opening Day is up in the air. And, Harvey could return to New York for tests.

I would definitely say there’s reason to be concerned.

HARVEY: Opening Day in limbo. (Getty)

HARVEY: Opening Day in limbo. (Getty)

Harvey was scheduled to pitch Tuesday, but that’s not happening. Nobody knows for sure when Harvey will pitch again.

“It’s a non-baseball medical issue that we have to address,” Alderson told reporters. “It came up this morning as far as I know. There will be some follow-up tests and consultation that will take place over the next couple of days.”

Alderson said Harvey will undergo tests and the results might not be known for several days. That will only lead to speculation.

“I think it’s a little early to attach any level of concern,” Alderson said. “I think we need to wait for more medical information before we decide it’s of concern, or great concern, or no concern. It’s way too premature for us to be discussing anything related to Opening Day.

“I understand Opening Day is not too far away, but we’re dealing with tomorrow, and we should know something more tomorrow – or the next day. But right now he’s not pitching tomorrow. That’s kind of where the story ends.”

Only it won’t be ending as the questions are only beginning, with not the least of them being: “If you’re a Mets’ fan should you be concerned?”

I would think, yes.

 

 

 

Mar 25

Cespedes Being Cespedes?

Mets manager Terry Collins has been known to fall on the sword for his players when they screw up. He’s done it for Matt Harvey and he did it again Thursday for Yoenis Cespedes after he misplayed A.J. Reed‘s drive into an inside-the-park home run.

Cespedes has been known to give up on plays and go through the motions. Yes, I know it was only an exhibition game, a “practice game,” if you will. But, don’t you practice to get it right?

CESPEDES:  Yoenis Being Yoenis. (AP)

CESPEDES: Yoenis Being Yoenis. (AP)

“Yes, I guess I could grab it,” Cespedes told reporters what his thought process was as the play unfolded.

“He thought it got stuck,” Collins said. “The umpire [C.B. Bucknor] went out and swiped the ball and said it wasn’t stuck. It’s one of those things we could talk about a ground rule, [but] we don’t talk about that much in spring training. … It was just a misunderstanding more than anything.”

Misunderstanding? Huh, that’s an odd choice of words. Cespedes would have had a better chance of selling it had he bothered to bend down and reach for the ball. It’s not really a novel thought.

“The ball fell under the fence,” Cespedes said. “It got wedged in there. For me, I couldn’t grab that. I thought that should have followed the ground rule and should have just been the double.”

Bucknor easily swiped the ball from under the fence, so it clearly did not get wedged. And, as far as not being able to grab it, well, that could be because he never reached for it. The ball isn’t going to come to him, after all.

It will take some doing to beat this out as the dumbest quote of the year.

“[The umpire] said, ‘You should be able to grab that,’ ” Cespedes said. “I said, ‘Of course I could grab that –  if I stick my hand in there and pull it out, yes, I guess I could grab it.’ He stuck his hand in there and pulled it out. I could have done that as well. I just didn’t think that was what I needed to do.”

Translation: “Yeah, I could have gotten the ball had I bothered.”

Cespedes has been known to mailing it in and assuming the play. He got away with it Thursday because the game didn’t matter. That’s his free one. Here’s hoping he learned something and doesn’t do the same thing when the games count.

They will in a little over a week, and that’s when the Mets start paying him $27.5 million.