Dec 18

Harvey Excited About Mets’ New Additions

harvey

So far, Mets GM Sandy Alderson has gotten many of his players pumped up after shelling out $87 million for outfielders Chris Young, 30, and Curtis Granderson, 33, plus the addition of 41-year old starting pitcher Bartolo Colon. In the space of one week, Alderson added 44 years of baseball experience to the 25 man roster.

David Wright has already given the moves two thumbs up, and on Monday night, Mets ace Matt Harvey gave his vote of confidence.

“I like it,” Harvey said on the MSG Network Monday night at halftime of the Knicks’ 102-101 loss to the Wizards. “I talked to owner Jeff Wilpon, and he gave me a call after he signed both those guys. We’re really excited for Mets baseball.”

Harvey, who will miss the 2014 season due to Tommy John surgery, said his rehab has gone according to plan so far.

“Everything’s going really well,” he said. “Obviously, at this point, I wish I could be out there for Opening Day. I’ve come to the realization that’s not really possible. Rehab is going really well, and my arm feels extremely well. It’s a slow process, but everything’s going really well.”

“Bartolo’s going to have to hold it down for me while I’m gone,” he said.

Presented By Diehards

Dec 15

Collins Is Hopeful That Wheeler Will Toss 200 Innings

WHEELER: High hopes for him.

WHEELER: High hopes for him.

As of now, the New York Mets don’t anticipate an innings limitations on Zack Wheeler, who was shut down for his last two starts in 2013. Wheeler threw 100 innings last year and said an innings limit hasn’t been determined, and if one is later on, it won’t be until after the season starts.

“We haven’t talked about [an innings limit],’’ manager Terry Collins said. “He should get over 200 if he goes out there 30?something times.  If he does that, he would have a heck of a year. When you’re getting those kinds of innings, you’re keeping your team in games.’’

Hopefully, that thinking won’t change and the Mets will not put the shackles on Wheeler, who won’t learn how to pitch on this level unless he does so.

Pitchers today wear down when they don’t accumulate innings. If a pitcher doesn’t build up his arm, he won’t have anything in the tank when he needs it. There are times when a pitcher has to learn to pitch in the eighth and ninth innings, when he’s running on fumes, when he just has to reach down.

Wheeler had his rough moments last summer, such as when he went away from his fastball and told to work in more on his secondary pitches. When that approach was adjusted to where he could work more off his fastball, Wheeler pitched well.

Collins said he believes Wheeler’s demeanor and emotional make-up could allow him to make a jump similar to what Matt Harvey made last season before he injured. Collins said Harvey learned how to make adjustments within a game and thinks Wheeler can do likewise.

“I’m hoping he takes the Matt Harvey step,’’  Collins said. “[Wheeler] now realizes he can fix it.  He realized all he had to do was make things.  He didn’t have to overthrow.

“He’s still got that great arm if he needs it.  His command of his secondary pitches got better.  I think his confidence rose as the season went along.  Again, I think the sky is the limit for what potential this guy has.’’

Wheeler told ESPN Radio he plans on reporting to spring training around Feb. 5, which is ten days before the official reporting date for pitchers and catchers.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 10

Wilpon: Matt Harvey Injury Impacted Mets’ Offseason Approach

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – New York Mets chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon conceded this afternoon what we’ve known for months: Matt Harvey’s elbow injury greatly impacted the team’s offseason plans.

For one thing, the Mets would only need one pitcher and not two at the back end of their rotation.

WILPON: Harvey's injury had impact.

WILPON: Harvey’s injury had impact.

“Matt getting hurt has taken away unquestionably a guy who looked like he was going to be our ace,’’ Wilpon said. “It changes things a little bit. We don’t need an extra pitcher if Matt is the guy there. And you might use the resources elsewhere.’’

Since Sandy Alderson became general manager, the plan was to compete in 2014 when the contracts for Johan Santana and Jason Bay came off the books. Now, the talk is for 2015 when Harvey is back from Tommy John surgery.

“I don’t have an answer. You’d like to say no,’’ Wilpon said when asked if the Mets tempered expectations with Harvey gone. “But if he was going to be out there for 200 innings, you’d think the results would be pretty good. Taking away those 200 innings is definitely an issue.’’

Wilpon said Anderson isn’t restrained by finances, but the Mets haven’t moved on Bronson Arroyo, who has been an effective innings eater for years. Reportedly, Arroyo is close to signing with Minnesota. Bringing in Arroyo or Paul Maholm aren’t current options. However, re-signing Jeremy Hefner is, although he won’t pitch in 2014 as he’s recovering from Tommy John surgery.

Alderson said the Mets would be interested in talking to Johan Santana, who just got a $5.5 million buyout from the team. Santana is throwing off flat ground at 150 feet, so he’s nowhere close to being an option. There are a half-dozen teams interested in talking to Santana when he’s ready. Of course, Santana won’t give the Mets any kind of discount. Don’t be surprised if Santana ends up where he started, which is Minnesota.

As for a fourth starter, there’s a disconnect between Terry Collins and Alderson on Jenrry Mejia. Today Collins said Mejia should be ready for spring training, but yesterday Alderson indicated he might not be ready until after the season started.

The Mets are reluctant to open the season with one of their young pitchers in the rotation, but Collins said: “Somebody has to win Rookie of the Year. Why not one of our guys?’’

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 10

Curtis Granderson Makes Good First Impression

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – On his unveiling as a member of the New York Mets, outfielder Curtis Granderson said all the right things, including: “A lot of people I’ve met in New York have always said true New Yorkers are Mets fans.’’

Now, how can you not like that enthusiasm?

GRANDERSON: Good first impression.

GRANDERSON: Good first impression.

Both GM Sandy Alderson and Jeff Wilpon praised Granderson’s professionalism and clubhouse presence, and said it was a major consideration in bringing him to the Mets.

Granderson is expected to ease the burden for David Wright, both as a run producer and in the clubhouse.

“He brings, No. 1, professionalism,’’ Alderson said. “He brings a personality. He brings credibility. He brings talent … all things that are important.’’

Granderson said the Yankees were upfront with him in their rebuilding plans, and while he talked to other teams – including Boston after Jacoby Ellsbury left – the Mets were by far the most aggressive in recruiting him.

“A lot of homework went into it,’’ Granderson said. “[The Mets] were the best fit possible.’’

Even without Matt Harvey available this season, the Mets sold Granderson on better days – years – in the future. With the Yankees, Granderson knew they would be competitive. The Mets had to convince him.

“They have a plan that’s getting in place,’’ Granderson said. “It’s going to take 25 guys. They have an opportunity to go out there and do some things.’’

Regarding Granderson’s contract, both the player and Alderson said a fourth year was important. Alderson said there were no bells and whistles in the contract, such as a no-trade clause.

“It was your typical, boilerplate, $60-million contract,’’ said Alderson.

ON DECK: Nothing imminent in dealing Ike Davis.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 10

Mets’ Reluctance To Go Multi-Year On Contracts Works Against Them In Pitching Hunt

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – The New York Mets’ reluctance to offer multi-year contracts and their young pitching depth are working against them in their quest for a veteran pitcher.

“We’d be hesitant to give a multi-year contract, but doesn’t mean we wouldn’t,’’ Alderson said.

WHEELER: The model route to the majors.

WHEELER: The model route to the majors.

However, any free agent only hears the first part of that statement.

The Mets are high on their young pitching talent of Zack Wheeler, Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard and Rafael Montero, and Alderson cited those arms for the reason to be cautious in offering multiple years.

“I think the type of talent we have coming. That’s the primary consideration,’’ Alderson said of what’s holding him back in making a major signing.

That scenario works both ways, as a veteran pitcher could be reluctant to sign on for a job that might disappear after three months.

Alderson said the Mets are interested in bringing back Daisuke Matsuzaka, but nothing is imminent on that front. Apparently, Aaron Harang is not an option to bring back.

“We haven’t had any real dialog yet,’’ Alderson said of Matsuzaka. “But, Dice-K is on our list.’’

In each of the last two years the Mets took their time in promoting Matt Harvey and Wheeler to the major leagues, and Alderson doesn’t plan to deviate from that approach now.

“I think we have the possibility of pushing guys a little harder,’’ Alderson said. “But, we’d ideally we’d like to follow that prior approach. It’s not an unusual path. … Ideally, we’d like to ease guys in, but these aren’t ideal times.’’

However, there are such things, as the elbow injury to Harvey, that makes the desired path not possible.

Alderson doesn’t have to look any further than Harvey’s surgically-repaired elbow to know even the best plans can change.

ON DECK: Jenrry Mejia not close to being ready.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos